Automotive Industry and Car Reviews

Old automotive pages from 2007 and Before

Honda and Toyota offer wildly different visions of Crossover styles

One’s a truck that drives like an SUV; the other is an SUV that drives like a truck. Which one makes more sense?

Naturally, it depends on the task at hand. If you’re looking for a small pickup truck that rides like more a car, the Honda Ridgeline is the clear choice. But if you want a brawny adventurer that’ll be as comfortable off the asphalt as it is inside the city, the Toyota 4Runner is the winner.

And never will the twain meet, except perhaps in this column.

By Jim Bray - Saturday, April 22, 2017 - Full Story

Ford SUV’s offer good driving and plentiful technology for 2017

Ford offers a long list of SUV’s for sale, from the entry size Escape to the humongous Expedition, all of which face stiff competition from a huge number of SUV/Crossover models available. So how do the three most popular models stack up for the 2017 model year?

Pretty well, I’d say, though I haven’t driven all of the competition recently. But after a week with each of the Escape, Edge and Explorer (with a week off between to fall under the spell of the exquisite new Lincoln Continental), I came away impressed with how well the vehicles drive, how easy they are to operate, and how nice they are overall.

I slid my prodigious posterior into the Edge first, Ford of Canada’s sample wearing the Sport trim level that immediately caused my ears to perk up. Sure, it’s a bigger SUV than I like (which makes the Explorer even more so…), but - at least in the Sport trim - it drives smaller than it looks, and that made a huge difference to my enjoyment.

New Hyundai hybrid an interesting and rewarding drive

Hyundai’s Ioniq green car is so new we don’t even have a published price for it in Canada yet, but it’s worth waiting for because the hybrid is so good to drive I kept forgetting it’s an earth saver.

Heck, I liked driving the Ioniq so much that, after all my hybrid humour and hammering over the years, I figure I’m risking a lightning bolt from above just for saying I like this car. And isn’t that ioniq, er I mean ironic?

Motoring: Honda HR-V

When the Honda HR-V arrives on my doorstep (it’s a tough job being a motoring journalist) I am very pleasantly surprised. You see I remember the original HR-V in production from 1999 to 2006, which looked, frankly, strange. It was a quirky vehicle that didn’t really look comfortable in itself and quite boxy, too.

This second generation model is a veritable delight. It’s curvaceous and sexy and extremely youthful looking no doubt enhanced by its pearly white finish. First and foremost it is a sports utility vehicle (SUV) but I would go as far as saying that it is one of the most stylish I have had the pleasure of driving. Head on it looks fresh; I like the curvaceous front end and from the rear there is a hint of the frog about it thanks to its slightly arched back.

By Tim Saunders - Sunday, April 9, 2017 - Full Story

New Continental puts Lincoln firmly back on the map

It doesn’t wallow, nor does it feel like a car my grandfather would drive. In fact, it looks as if Lincoln has thrown down a gauntlet with the 2017 Continental, announcing to the world that the famed marque is not only back, but capable of taking on the competitors head to head.

When was the last time you read that about a Lincoln Continental?

It’s something I had never written before, let alone thought.  Oh, I liked the MKZ I drove last fall a lot, but as nice as it was it still felt like a “gussied up” Fusion (which it is, really), whereas after spending a week in the grand new Continental I came away excited for the future of the famed nameplate, which had kind of gone to sleep as a major luxury brand.

Canadian Taxpayers Federation Reacts to Corporate Welfare Announcement for Ford Canada

OTTAWA, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) Federal Director Aaron Wudrick released the following statement in response to today’s joint Federal-Ontario announcement regarding Ford Canada:

“The federal and Ontario governments continue to double down on the failed strategy of taxpayer subsidies to private businesses. It is ludicrous to suggest that Ford ‘needed’ a $200 million handout from Ontario and Canadian taxpayers, as the company earned a global pre-tax profit of more than US$10 billion in 2015. If the federal and Ontario governments are concerned about business competitiveness, they should eliminate misguided policies that drive up costs (such as the Green Energy Act and carbon cap-and-trade) and lower business taxes.

Corporate welfare is an unsustainable, wasteful and unfair approach to economic development that creates perverse incentives and teaches businesses that the key to success is to cozy up to governments for free taxpayer money.”

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Aaron Wudrick, CTF Federal Director- Thursday, March 30, 2017 - Full Story

Kia Sorento a fine ride that outdoes some higher end SUV’s

Though there’s only been some minor tweaking done to the Kia Sorento for 2017, that isn’t cause for any concern.

In fact, the undoubted rationale for maintaining the status quo is that the SUV/Crossover was already a darn fine vehicle, with lots of equipment stuffed into it, and even without a major overhaul it’s still highly competitive in the crowded market niche of mid-sized utility vehicles.

This is the vehicle, after all, that drove away with the Best SUV/CUV ($35K - $60K) award after competing at the 2016 Canadian Car of the Year TestFest. It beat out the BMW X1, Ford Edge, Honda Pilot, Hyundai Tucson (conventional and Fuel Cell Electric), and the exquisite Lexus NX 200t (F SPORT) for the honours so, unless the collected auto journalists that voted on the category were collectively delusional - and I would never accuse them of that! - it’s quite the vehicle.

By Jim Bray - Saturday, March 18, 2017 - Full Story

Honda adds an ugly but kind of fun hatchback to its Civic line

You could look at it as a return to form, an extra reason to give Honda’s classic Civic a look if you’re in the market for a mainstream car.  And it is, somewhat, because Honda offered hatchback Civics in Canada for many years.

Alas, this isn’t Civics of old and, as great as it is in so many ways, it’s still a current Honda and that means it may drive you nuts as you drive.

Full disclosure: I once owned a Honda Civic hatchback, a silver 1976 model I adored and drove happily for three years, at which time it was pretty well rusted out and went from being wonderfully dependable to woefully undependable. But those were a great three years of cheap and fun driving.

I traded straight across a six month old 1975.5 MGB (which sold for appreciably more than the Civic and which kept leaving me on the side of the road) moving in the process to something that would hold the family we were planning to build at the time. And even though I only got three years out of that Civic before it informed me non-verbally that it was retiring, I never questioned that swap.

By Jim Bray - Saturday, March 11, 2017 - Full Story

Canadians want reliability in their cars - so how does 2017’s crop stack up?

Forget fine Corinthian leather, ultimate connectivity and high horsepower. It appears that Canadians are more interested in buying a vehicle that doesn’t leave them stranded on the side of the road than they are in creature comforts or high technology.

That’s according to a survey of Canadian men and women (or, to be inclusive "memen"), as reported by a GfK survey of over 22,000 Internet users in 17 countries, though only 1,002 of them were from the Once Great White North. It appears to be a "yuge" majority,  too: more than eight in 10 women (83 per cent) and 77 per cent of men named reliability as the number one feature they seek out when they put down their hard-earned after-tax cash for a new set of wheels.

That’s a pretty hefty margin! On the other hand, only 23 per cent of guys and 17 per cent of gals seek out the latest technology in a vehicle they purchase. I can see that to a certain extent: some of the current safety nannies, like lane departure warnings, can be very obtrusive and annoying, and the first time one experiences them can be a bit of a freak-out.

By Jim Bray - Saturday, March 11, 2017 - Full Story