Automotive Industry and Car Reviews

Old automotive pages from 2007 and Before

Volkswagen Trendline

It is necessary to adapt your driving style when behind the wheel of a vehicle that does not have a rear view mirror.

This becomes clear when I am sat in the Volkswagen Transporter Trendline 2.0 TDi Bluemotion. It is the white van man’s dream vehicle, tough and robust, fast and efficient. And although it very much does feel like a car to drive with fairly light steering and a good driving position, the fact remains that there are no windows at the rear and no rear view mirror.

By Tim Saunders - Friday, July 28, 2017 - Full Story

GM considers pulling the plug on the Chevy Volt

The Chevy Volt was unveiled in 2010 to great fanfare. Politicians hailed it. The media gushed over it. The first electric car manufactured domestically, it was instantly a cause celebre, and it was hailed as part of the resurrection of General Motors.

There was one problem, though. The public was never excited about the Volt. With a price tag of more than $40,000, even government rebates of $7,500 weren’t enough tto convince many people to buy a Volt. It drives well enough and it’s true that you don’t have to put much gas in it (although you do need some in reserve just in case), but that type of price tag isn’t within reach for most people, and GM seems to have forgotten that electricity isn’t free either.

By Dan Calabrese - Monday, July 24, 2017 - Full Story

Michelin debuts airless tyre concept that never needs to be replaced

Earlier this month, Michelin—the company behind the chubby white tyre man we all know and love—unveiled a revolutionary new airless tyre concept. The ‘Visionary Concept’ tyre is 3D printed from recycled biodegradable materials and is designed to be the puncture-proof tyre of the future.

The Visionary Concept is actually a tyre and wheel combo. which mimics the structure of coral or the human lung, by being constructed from a number of smaller cells. This biomimetic structure is designed to be generative, meaning that the tyre never needs to be replaced, by enabling fresh tread to be added via 3D printing.—More…

By News on the Net -- Adapt Network- Monday, July 24, 2017 - Full Story

Ford F-150’s blend comfort with utility and size - and even some fun!

Ford’s F-150 truck line has been at or near the top of the vehicular sales heap for decades, and that’s a laudable achievement in an ever-more-competitive automotive marketplace. Especially for a truck!

And even though the joy of a full sized pickup truck is nearly entirely lost on me, I just got to spend two weeks behind the wheel of two Ford F-150 samples, a fairly conventional (but quite loaded) F-150 Lariat edition and (drum roll…) the Mighty Raptor.

Few vehicles raise a smile in the way that a Range Rover does

Few vehicles raise a smile in the way that a Range Rover does when you are behind the wheel, I find.

It’s always an absolute privilege to find yourself sitting in the high quality cabin and it is a fantastic experience. Imagine your favourite armchair and then add all the electronic gadgetry that you can conjure up and here is a seat that can be electrically adjusted to your heart’s content providing that ultimate driving position. Then of course there is the sheer height of this luxury off roader, which stands head and shoulders above most other vehicles apart from lorries. This means that the driver and front passenger have a marvellous view of the road ahead, which is perfect for overtaking. Despite its sheer size and weight this 4x4 is pretty quick off the mark and if the accelerator is pushed to the floor it makes safe light work of most opportunities that present themselves on the open road. Zero to 60mph is accomplished in a little over seven seconds, which is very impressive. There are so many luxuries fitted to this vehicle that it makes a Rolls Royce blush. Shut the door and the Range Rover ensures that the door is properly closed as you can see in the video at Testdrives.biz. The two section boot opens and closes at the push of a button. This is all well and good but ironically, after reading a newspaper article about how a woman lost her arm in the door of a neighbour’s car, I come close to trapping mine in the boot of the Range Rover but thankfully escape with a light bruise. It seems to shut and continues even if a hand is in the way. There needs to be a sensor to prevent this from happening.

By Tim Saunders - Tuesday, July 4, 2017 - Full Story

2018 Buick Regal TourX Priced To Start From $29,995

Buick made headlines headlines when it officially announced a wagon would be returning to its portfolio. The 2018 Buick Regal TourX aims to inject a dose of “white space” to the Regal nameplate and potentially offer the Subaru Outback some competition.

Now, it has a price tag. CarsDirect reports the 2018 Regal TourX will start at $29,995 including destination when it goes on sale in late fall of this year. Under $30,000 seems like a sweet deal, but it may be difficult to nab one at that price.

That’s because the $29,995 price tag represents the base 1SV trim, while the $33,575 Preferred 1SB trim will likely be the TourX stocked on dealership lots. Per the norm with Buick, the base model will likely not receive many incentives either.—More…

By News on the Net - Thursday, June 29, 2017 - Full Story

U.S. States Would Be Barred From Setting Individual Self-Driving Car Standards Under New Proposed Pl

The United States House of Representatives released its early draft of self-driving car framework earlier this month and it would mean more federal government control and less say from individual states.

Reuters reports the self-driving car plan would diminish states’ rights and limit what a particular state could regulate with regards to autonomous cars and their rollout. California and New York have proposed legislation to initially limit the roll out of driverless cars and associated technology.—More…

By News on the Net -- GMAuthority.com- Wednesday, June 28, 2017 - Full Story

AV’s mean more safety and savings for U.S. drivers

EDGEWATER, Maryland — Visitors to the General Motors Futurama pavilion at the New York World’s Fair of 1939 saw something quite amazing for its time: an automated highway system.  It was a dazzling display of thousands of cars and trucks operating without driver assistance for maximum traffic flow and efficiency. 

The GM Futurama program was the work of famed industrial designer Norman Bel Geddes, who many credited with conceiving what became the first modern interstate highway system. 

Today, Bel Geddes, who died in 1958, is being given even more credit: for introducing a whole new world of automated transportation.

By Guest Column -- William H. Noack- Sunday, June 25, 2017 - Full Story

Say goodbye to an American tradition: The thrill of the open road

BALTIMORE — Self-driving cars will kill our precious thrill of the open road while hurting large segments of our economy.

When killjoys and bureaucrats get their way, we give up the things that make our lives rich and fun.  We’re are approaching that now with these pod-like vehicles.

Private companies and federal agencies are working to put millions of driverless cars on America’s roads, and there’s a good chance those vehicles will eventually comprise the majority of personal vehicles on our roads: Some are predicting fully automated cars could be 10 percent of global vehicle sales yearly by 2035 and that percentage likely will grow.

By Guest Column -- Whitt Flora- Thursday, June 22, 2017 - Full Story

Mazda’s little bundle of joy continues to please

Ah, the Mazda MX-5. Once called the Miata, the Japanese carmaker’s little open top roadster has been around for nearly 30 years and during that time has evolved and grown like most cars.

But unlike some cars that get overstyled or “over-teched” or which lose their original mien over the years, Mazda has never lost the Miata’s focus of delivering the kind of driving joy that used to be found on such cars as the MGB, but without leaving you on the side of the road every time it rains.

Okay, that may be an exaggeration about the old British sports cars, but I’ve owned three MGB’s (in various states of repair from “on its last legs” to “brand new”) and they all left me on the side of the road - so much so that I look back now, decades later, and find it hard to believe I could have been so stupid as to get kicked by that particular mule three times. What can I say? I was a kid.