Lifestyles:

Health and Medicine, Travel, Gardening, Pets, Automotive

AV’s mean more safety and savings for U.S. drivers

EDGEWATER, Maryland — Visitors to the General Motors Futurama pavilion at the New York World’s Fair of 1939 saw something quite amazing for its time: an automated highway system.  It was a dazzling display of thousands of cars and trucks operating without driver assistance for maximum traffic flow and efficiency. 

The GM Futurama program was the work of famed industrial designer Norman Bel Geddes, who many credited with conceiving what became the first modern interstate highway system. 

Today, Bel Geddes, who died in 1958, is being given even more credit: for introducing a whole new world of automated transportation.

By Guest Column -- William H. Noack- Sunday, June 25, 2017 - -- Automotive

The Horticultural Alice

When Lewis Carroll penned Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in 1865, followed six years later with Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There he must never have thought that over 150 years later they would never have been out of print. As most know, ‘Lewis Carroll’ was the pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, a mathematician and lecturer at Christ College, Oxford.

Translated into at least 174 languages, they have been enjoyed by both Queen Victoria and Oscar Wilde. Presented on the stage, film and television, the two stories are usually blended together. As early as 1886 a musical play was presented in London’s West End. A British silent film followed in 1903, a Broadway play in 1915, a television adaptation in 1937. In evitable there has been a Disney animation, as well as ballets, operas and even, in 1976, a porn-musical.

By Wes Porter - Saturday, June 24, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

Centipedes and Millipedes

Often found in damp gardens, a Victorian poetess elucidated:

The centipede was happy, quite
Until the toad in fun, said,
“Pray which leg goes before which?”
And she laid distracted in the ditch
Figuring how to run

By Wes Porter - Thursday, June 22, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

Say goodbye to an American tradition: The thrill of the open road

BALTIMORE — Self-driving cars will kill our precious thrill of the open road while hurting large segments of our economy.

When killjoys and bureaucrats get their way, we give up the things that make our lives rich and fun.  We’re are approaching that now with these pod-like vehicles.

Private companies and federal agencies are working to put millions of driverless cars on America’s roads, and there’s a good chance those vehicles will eventually comprise the majority of personal vehicles on our roads: Some are predicting fully automated cars could be 10 percent of global vehicle sales yearly by 2035 and that percentage likely will grow.

By Guest Column -- Whitt Flora- Thursday, June 22, 2017 - -- Automotive

First dual-targeting nanoparticles lower cancer’s defenses and attack tumors

Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment.  But the approach only works in a fraction of patients and can cause nasty side effects. Now, in the journal ACS Nano, scientists report the development of the first dual-cell targeting immunotherapy nanoparticle that slows tumor growth in mice with different cancers. In their study, up to half the mice in one cancer group went into full remission after the treatment.

Immunotherapy works by giving the body’s own immune system a boost in its fight against disease. In cancer patients, there are two main lines of immunotherapy: One disables cancer cells’ ability to hide from the immune system, and the other recruits the body’s T cells to destroy tumors. Jonathan P. Schneck and colleagues wanted to see if they could combine these two tactics with one nanoparticle-based platform.

 

Multiple sclerosis study reveals possible trigger

Multiple sclerosis, one of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases, affects some 2.5 million people worldwide and has no known cure.

Researchers have long speculated that MS is triggered by the body’s own immune system unleashing an uncontrolled attack on myelin sheaths that protect nerve cells (neurons).

A study published by Israeli scientists in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS) pinpoints a structural instability in the myelin membranes, the “insulating tape” surrounding neurons.

This vulnerability seems to be what gives the immune system access to otherwise protected regions.—More…

Fed roundup of Chaldean Christians in Detroit stirs outpouring of sympathy in U.S

Evangelical leader the Rev. Franklin Graham has said the arrests of hundreds of Chaldean Christians in Detroit and other cities nationwide is “very disturbing,” and urged President Donald Trump to consider their fate if deported back to Iraq.

“I find it very disturbing what I have read about Chaldean Christians being rounded up by U.S. ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) for possible deportation. I would encourage the president to have someone investigate these cases thoroughly,” Graham said on Facebook Friday.

“I understand a policy of deporting people who are here illegally and have broken the law. I don’t know all of the details, but I would encourage our president to give great consideration to the threat to lives of Christians in countries like Iraq.”

By News on the Net - Tuesday, June 20, 2017 - -- Faith

Over the Edge: An Experience I‘ll Never Forget

Why would anyone in their 94th year, without consulting a psychiatrist, agree to descend from the top of Toronto’s City Hall on a rope? My wife thought I had gone mad. Surreptitiously, I momentarily agreed with her! So what was it like descending (rappelling) from the top of a 30 story high building? And why did I do it?

My son is one of many volunteer WISH Grantors for Make-A-Wish Canada. It grants wishes to children who have life-threatening illnesses. Since 1983 it fulfilled all kinds of requests for 6,800 children. And each year 600 more are granted the wish of their dreams. I discovered that my son was rappelling not only for a great cause but also for his current wish child, Kyle.  It occurred that I might join him in this worthy cause.

So what wishes do these children seek? You may have guessed that many young children want to go to Disneyland and meet Mickey Mouse. Some ask for the experience of meeting a fire-fighter. Others who hope to become a ballerina want to meet one.

Persistence Always Pays

When I was a boy, my father worried that I was unlikely to go far in life until I overcame my stubborn nature, and whenever he tried to convince me of that, I stubbornly persisted the he was confusing stubbornness with persistence.

One day, after putting up with my hard-headedness as long as he intended to, he said, “Junior, since you work with Jaybird every day, I’ll ask him about all this persistence you profess to have.”

Early the next morning, my boyhood best friend and mentor Jaybird took his work crew to a field on Dad’s Mississippi Delta farm where the cotton seedlings needed thinning so that they wouldn’t crowd each other as they matured. After handing all of us sharpened hoes, he said those words we’d heard so many time: “Start yo’ rows.”

By Jimmy Reed - Monday, June 19, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

A Rose Is a Rose Is a Rose

So advised Gertrude Stein—probably about the only thing she is widely remembered for, despite the best efforts of Alice Toklas, who engraved the words onto the edges of decorative plates—presumably when she wasn’t cooking up cannabis brownies.

June is reckoned as Rose Month, and not only for those of European descent. The Algonkian tribes of northeastern North America called it the Rose Full Moon Month. But our fascination with roses commences far earlier in time and away.

The Minoan civilization on the Mediterranean island of Crete persisted from about 3500-1400 B.C. before succumbing to a massive eruption on a nearby Aegean volcano. Surviving rooms in the palaces had decorative friezes depicting, among other subjects—roses.

By Wes Porter - Thursday, June 15, 2017 - -- Lifestyles