Lifestyles:

Health and Medicine, Travel, Gardening, Pets, Automotive

Is It Nuclear War, Viral Epidemic or Azoospermia?

It’s been said that “Those who do not remember history are destined to relive it”. Today, the problem is that none of us seem to remember history, so we’re destined to relive it one way or another. So will our civilization end with a nuclear holocaust? A world-wide viral pandemic? Or, will it be due to azoospermia? Then, whatever happens, we can give our planet back to animals who deserve it more than humans. After all, they only kill to eat!

While I was in premedical training, rats taught me an important biological lesson. Place two rats in a cage and they enjoy the company. A few more keep them happy. But keep adding them, and they, like humans, start to kill one another. Later, during fish research in northern Canada, I learned another biological fact. A lake can only support so many fish. The rest begin to die.

Does VW’s Atlas hold the company’s future on its shoulders?

Volkswagen’s first all new SUV since the Tiguan is here, and it’s bigger, more angular - and more modern in VW’s inventory, than the Tiguan and the Touareg.  Will it be enough to help turn around any negative public impressions there may be coming out of the diesel kerfuffle of the past couple of years?

Who knows? I doubt one model could do that - though the Atlas is a darn fine place to start. Besides, I think the whole diesel thing was BS anyway - and a shame from consumers’ standpoints. That’s because, if I were to buy a vehicle today that was offered in gas or diesel, in most cases I’d opt for the diesel. Sure, they’re down on horsepower, but they generate gobs of torque, which is more important for the lead footed, plus they get terrific fuel mileage. And, though prices wobble wildly, diesel is often cheaper than gasoline.

By Jim Bray - Sunday, August 20, 2017 - -- Automotive

Neanderthals

Way out in the farthest, least populated back reaches of the Mississippi Delta, rows of wrecked automobiles, engines, transmissions, and tires crisscrossed a huge junkyard owned by four brothers.

Everybody in the Delta knew where the junkyard was, and referred to its owners, not by name, but as the Neanderthals. Antisocial, they seemed to have no use for females, who were terrified of them (as were no small number of men), not to mention children, for whom they were the source of screaming nightmares.

By Jimmy Reed - Friday, August 18, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

Education Created and Promoted Progressivism, ANTIFA, and BLM

As a parent who struggles to pay the tuition for their child at the average university in America, or goes into debt borrowing the money, consider what your child must face in order to finish a four years of college education, which may or may not help them get a job.

The American campus is no longer the place of learning, to discuss and exchange ideas, it has become a place of indoctrination, of fear, a place where your children are further indoctrinated, and are not prepared to deal with or function in real life and in the job world.

By Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh - Thursday, August 17, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

10 of the hottest self-driving technologies from Israel

“Car manufacturing is not about tires or brakes anymore, but the technology inside the car – the sensors and algorithms.”

How did Israel, a country that has no domestic car manufacturing industry, become a worldwide powerhouse for autonomous-driving technology (also known as self-driving cars)?

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - -- Automotive

Celebs Love to Dine in New Zealand

With fresh, farm-to-table produce, innovative chefs and some stunning restaurant settings, it’s no surprise that international celebrities love dining in New Zealand. From pop star Taylor Swift to action man Jason Statham, check out the favourite foodie haunts of visiting celebrities.

By News on the Net - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - -- Travel

Spider peptides battle superbugs and cancer

As antibiotic resistance rises and fears over superbugs grow, scientists are looking for new treatment options. One area of focus is antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which could someday be an alternative to currently prescribed antibiotics, many of which are becoming increasingly useless against some bacteria. Now, a team reports in ACS Chemical Biology that they have improved the antimicrobial — and anticancer — properties of an AMP from a spider.

House dust spurs growth of fat cells in lab tests

Poor diet and a lack of physical activity are major contributors to the world’s obesity epidemic, but researchers have also identified common environmental pollutants that could play a role. Now one team reports in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology that small amounts of house dust containing many of these compounds can spur fat cells to accumulate more triglycerides, or fat, in a lab dish.

Why durian is the smelly ‘king of fruits’ (video)

WASHINGTON, Aug. 15, 2017 — Durian is known as the king of fruits in Southeast Asia, but it’s also banned from many public spaces due to its powerful odor. This week’s Reactions video explains the unique chemistry behind durian, and features fellow YouTubers from PBS Digital Studios reacting to this stinky delicacy as they try it for the first time:

 

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, August 15, 2017 - -- Lifestyles