Lifestyles:

Health and Medicine, Travel, Gardening, Pets, Automotive

Magnificent and a memorable family holiday awaits you at Tehidy

Tehidy is a small village in Cornwall, near Portreath, St Ives and the coast. It is a magnificent part of the world and a memorable family holiday awaits you at Tehidy Holiday Park.

“I have ploughed everything I have made back into the holiday park,” explains director Richard Barnes, who purchased the five-acre site 10 years ago and runs it with his family. “It was pretty run down then and I set about updating it, even adding tarmac roads.” We speak during the height of the holiday season when he has 350 guests staying on site: camping, static caravans and in his selection of self-catering holiday cottages. “We keep being asked for larger cottages so we are renovating another one at the moment which will have all the bells and whistles.”

By Tim Saunders - Monday, October 2, 2017 - -- Travel

Ten Vital Facts to Know About “Baby Aspirin”

One – You’re in your 50s. The Medical Publication, Health After 50, reports that a panel of experts has updated the guidelines for taking Aspirin at various ages. It says you, in your 50s, have a 10 percent or greater risk of coronary attack or stroke in the next 10 years, and a life expectancy of at least 10 years with no increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. If you meet one of these requirements it says you may be a candidate for a daily baby Aspirin (81 milligrams). You can calculate your risk of heart attack at http://www.cvriskcalculator.

Two – You’re in your 60s. In this case, the publication says you have a high risk of heart attack or stroke over the next 10 years and a life expectancy of at least 10 years with no increased risk of GI bleeding. If you meet one of the these requirements you must then be prepared to take a daily 81 mg. Aspirin for 10 years which is the minimum required for benefits to take effect.

Three - You’re 70 years of age or older, or younger than 50.  Here, experts say there’s not enough evidence to advise one way or the other in preventing either a first heart attack or colon cancer. But it adds that, since many over the age of 70 have health problems, the risk of heart attack or stroke may be increased. Then the benefits of a daily Aspirin may be substantial.

Acura adds A-Spec goodies to 2018 TLX

Honda’s luxury division may have sparked the Japanese invasion of the luxury and high end sports car markets - and led the way for several years after that - but you might wonder what the company has done lately.

Well, besides the new NSX supercar, the company has continued to release well built, luxurious vehicles that are stuffed with technology. The problem is, everyone else is doing the same thing, only some have now passed Acura’s lead enough that the folks at Honda’s top niche may find themselves a tad lost in the customer shuffle. And that’s a shame.

By Jim Bray - Friday, September 29, 2017 - -- Automotive

Disney jumps into 4K disc market with a bang

Disney’s first two 4K disc titles, Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2 and Pirates of the Caribbean Volume 5 are welcome additions to the burgeoning 4K title library, though one is much better than the other as both a home video presentation and as a movie.

Still, it’s nice to see Disney stepping up to the 4K world. The company may be many things, but stupid it is not. And it knows how to make money.

But there was a time when the company misunderestimated the marketplace so badly that it ended up suing a tech company for having the audacity to create a new technology! That was after Sony introduced the Betamax, ushering in the home video age - and Disney (and some other studios, if I remember correctly) sued them, ostensibly because they thought they’d lose a pile of money due to piracy, home taping, whatever.  It made no sense then and looking back on it now (and considering the percentage of its income Hollywood makes from video releases these days) Disney looks pretty silly.

By Jim Bray - Friday, September 29, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

Fuel-cell cars cruise onto the market

Fuel-cell powered cars that emit only water vapor when driven have been in the works for decades, but progress seemed to keep stalling. Now, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the wait is over. Motorists can finally lease or buy hydrogen-powered, fuel-cell cars, but the road ahead for these vehicles still faces some bumps.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 28, 2017 - -- Automotive

Ancient ink for cancer treatment

For hundreds of years, Chinese calligraphers have used a plant-based ink to create beautiful messages and art. Now, one group reports in ACS Omega that this ink could noninvasively and effectively treat cancer cells that spread, or metastasize, to lymph nodes.

Unlocking the mysteries of memory — and potentially enhancing it

Memory acts like an anchor, reminding us of past experiences that have made us who we are today. Attempts to boost it, particularly as we age, have sprouted cottage industries of supplements and brain games. In parallel, researchers have been pursuing pharmaceutical interventions. In some of the latest work on this front, one team reports in ACS Chemical Neuroscience that they have identified a novel compound that enhances long-term memory in animal studies.

You’re An Insolent Jerk!

Nowadays on many college campuses, if a teacher is not a secular progressive liberal new-world-order globalist, his colleagues may view him as a pariah. If he is a pro-life, pro-America, anti-political correctness, Southern white heterosexual male capitalistic Christian conservative, as I am, they will likely view him as a walking hate crime. 

Toward my college teaching career’s end, I learned how true this was after scolding a wimpy, coddled kid for disregarding my insistence on punctuality, preparation, proper classroom behavior, and attire.

He complained to his father, who complained to my supervisor, who called me on the carpet and warned me that if I didn’t go along in order to get along, he would issue me a pink slip reading, “So long.”

By Jimmy Reed - Thursday, September 28, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

Hidden bacteria can hinder chemotherapy, study finds

Bacteria hidden inside cancer cells may hinder the effectiveness of chemotherapy. The surprising finding was published last week in Science magazine based on research led by molecular cell biologist Ravid Straussman of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.