Lifestyles:

Health and Medicine, Travel, Gardening, Pets, Automotive

Rich & Famous-Style Accommodation in New Zealand

Lodge at The Hills
Luxury homes in New Zealand’s most idyllic locales offer those with a lot of discretionary income to experience a slice of Kiwi heaven. They attract both famous (from Justin Bieber to Lady Gaga) to more low-profile visitors. What all of the guests have in common is the wish to rest and relax in luxurious comfort on their vacation.

Southern Paradise

Justin Bieber and Katy Perry have both taken time out from their schedules (not together) to soak up the southern splendour of Queenstown at Lodge at The Hills. Located in The Hills golf course – and owned by Kiwi jewellery king Sir Michael Hill – this spot is worthy of such high-profile guests. The six-suite estate includes an art studio, music and media room, and a wine cellar dining room. It boasts a heated infinity pool, spa pool, sauna, private golf course and outdoor fireplace. Sound good? It should – the high-season rate is $32,250 NZD (approx. $28,150 Cdn) per night.

By News on the Net - Friday, November 24, 2017 - -- Travel

Car buyers lose big when big government tells them what to buy

Car buyers lose big when big government tells them what to buy
DALLAS — For a century carmakers built the cars and trucks their customers wanted.  That’s changing. Increasingly they’re building cars and trucks the government wants their customers to have—and that means electric vehicles (EVs).

CNN reports that China, France, Great Britain, India, Norway and Germany are considering banning the future production and sale of gasoline and diesel-powered engines.

By Merrill Matthews - Thursday, November 23, 2017 - -- Automotive

Watch: Wine “legs” and minibot motors

Watch: Wine
As any wine enthusiast knows, the “legs” that run down a glass after a gentle swirl of vino can yield clues about alcohol content. Interestingly, the physical phenomenon that helps create these legs can be harnessed to propel tiny motors to carry out tasks on the surface of water. Scientists demonstrate the motors in a report in ACS’ journal Langmuir.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

After cooking, biofortified corn and eggs retain vital nutrient needed to prevent blindness

Corn muffins and other foods made with biofortified maize and eggs retain vitamin A after being cooked
Fortified and biofortified foods are at the forefront of efforts to combat vitamin A deficiency worldwide. But little is known about what influence processing may have on the retention of vitamin A precursors in these foods. Now in a study appearing in ACS Omega, scientists report that a high percentage of these healthful substances — in some cases, almost all — can survive cooking, depending on the preparation method.

Strategies to combat the opioid epidemic

Strategies to combat the opioid epidemic
The opioid epidemic is ravaging lives and tearing families apart. Overdose deaths from heroin, fentanyl and misused prescription painkillers have tripled in the past 15 years. Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores how abuse-deterring and novel formulations for painkillers in addition to crime-fighting tools to quickly identify opioids could help curb the crisis.

Advocates of Abortion, Euthanasia, Invited to Speak at the Vatican

Advocates of Abortion, Euthanasia, Invited to Speak at the Vatican
Since 2013, many Catholics have been in denial about Rome’s collusion with abortionists, despite the fact that notorious abortion advocates like Paul Ehrlich and Jeffrey Sachs have repeatedly been invited to speak at the Vatican.

Once again, several advocates of abortion and euthanasia were given a platform to voice their views at a two-day “end of life” conference co-hosted by the Vatican’s Pontifical Academy for Life on November 16-17. The conference was conjointly organized by the World Medical Association, which supposedly opposes euthanasia, the German Medical Association, and the Pontifical Academy for Life, but it unfortunately provided a forum for the enemies of life to advance their agenda.

By David Martin - Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

Catholic Priest to be “excommunicated” if he doesn’t pledge fidelity to Francis’ agenda

Catholic Priest to be excommunicated, if he doesn't pledge fidelity to Francis' agenda
In a true spirit of heroism and love for the Church, Sicilian priest Don Minutella has put his neck on the line and said the Gospel truth for the sake of those who today are being tempted by the pontifical “operation of error to believe lying.” (2 Thess. 2:10) 

Don Minutella was sacked last June by the Vatican for his open criticism of Pope Francis’ teachings, and has been under an order of silence for the past nine months, but Rome is now giving him a chance to “vindicate” himself. Under the pretext of asking him to pledge fidelity to the pope, the Vatican is asking Don Minutella to deny his Catholic Faith, that is, to cease from his strict adherence to Church teaching and to accede to the perfidious teachings of Pope Francis, i.e. his blessing of adultery via Amoris Laetitia, his blessing of Luther, gays, Marxists, and anti-life globalists, and his incessant push to unite the Catholic Church with world religions. Rome has said that if Minutella doesn’t consent to their wish, he will receive “two excommunications.”

By David Martin - Tuesday, November 21, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

A Recipe for Alzheimer’s Disease

A Recipe for Alzheimer’s Disease
What causes Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)? I recently read an article written by Stephanie Seneff, a Senior Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. I know from my years at Harvard that MIT does not employ dummies. So it’s worthwhile reading her “Recipe for Developing AD.”

The Gardens of Gwyn

The Gardens of Gwyn
Eleanor ‘Nell’ Gwyn was many things in her time. She has remained so for more than 350 years. Commencing literally as a Cinderella—sifting ashes for unburnt fuel, she progressed to peddling turnips, selling ‘strong’ drinks in her mother’s brothel, to leading actress and, for seventeen years, mistress of the ‘Merry Monarch’ Charles II. She also became something of a gardener, owning a fair-sized property with her London townhouse and 40 acres of landscaped grounds up the Thames River at Burford House, Windsor. Both were gifts of Charles.

Born in 1650, little is known of her early life. By the age of 13, she was an orange girl, peddling the then exotic fruit for an exorbitant six pence each to gallants in the theatre audience. She would have been required to work six days a week, receiving a penny for each of her sales. This did not last for long. By April 1665 she had acquired fame as an actress among theatre goers. Within two years, aged just 17, she had found fame, if not fortune, on the London stage. Doubtlessly, this is where the king first saw her. Fascinated with this witty, petite performer Charles first sent for her as an entertainer. She became his long-lasting mistress. The rest, as they say, is history.

By Wes Porter - Sunday, November 19, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

New Zealand Tour Operators Celebrate Milestone Anniversaries

TranzAlpine train journey
TranzAlpine Train Celebrates 30th Anniversary

One of New Zealand’s most beloved tourism experiences, the iconic TranzAlpine train journey is celebrating 30 years of operation. Named one of the most scenic train rides in the world by international publications such as National Geographic Traveler magazine, the TranzAlpine is one of New Zealand’s three great rail journeys operated by KiwiRail.

By News on the Net - Friday, November 17, 2017 - -- Travel

Honda refreshes the Fit for 2018

Honda refreshes the Fit for 2018
Does Honda’s mid-cycle refresh of its little Fit mean the car’s a little Fitter now?

Indeed. The Fit is a good little car - despite the Honda-isms of the company’s current line that continuously drive me crazy - and Honda has indeed made it even better than before. They’ve even returned the volume control knob to the centre stack, proving that they either do listen to their critics or that they’ve actually started driving their own products for a change.

By Jim Bray - Friday, November 17, 2017 - -- Automotive

There’s No Such Thing As Good Gossip

There’s No Such Thing As Good Gossip
Recommending a book he had just finished, a friend said, “You will love it. The author rattles skeletons in the closets of some well-known folks. The juicy gossip it contains has made the book a bestseller.”

His comment confirms what we all know: With shameful regularity, gossip attracts even the most virtuous souls, and for those of us nowhere close to being in the most-virtuous-souls category, its appeal reaches intoxicating proportions.

By Jimmy Reed - Thursday, November 16, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

America’s Odyssey: You Can’t Go Home Again

In America’s Odyssey: You Can’t Go Home Again the much requested and long anticipated sequel to America’s Trojan War General Stamper and the Phantom Force face twin challenges as a war in Europe and the actions of an out of control central government threaten to destroy the last best hope for humanity: the United States. With wars raging on two continents and families ripped apart follow the saga of America’s General as he battles to save all we hold dear.

Available now from Amazon

America’s Odyssey: You Can’t Go Home Again

By News on the Net - Thursday, November 16, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

The Right Man for Healing and a Rare Find

The Right Man for Healing and a Rare Find
I was not sure my ENT specialist was a good fit for me even though I read the glowing praises framed on his office walls, praises coming from his patients, colleagues, and other doctors. The young man seemed to know what he was doing but his bedside manner was brief and rather cold.
I attributed his demeanor to his introverted personality, his professionalism, and to his respect for his patients’ time. Very punctual, he very seldom made anybody wait to see him, he was always on time.

One day I realized that he was much more caring on the inside than he let people see. A young woman with her mom and a three-year old in tow had an appointment to see the doctor. The receptionist, Lupe, asked her if she was prepared to pay for that day’s visit. The young woman had a grief-stricken look on her face and wondered how much the visit was going to be. The receptionist told her that she did not know because each patient was different, depending on the problem. The young woman replied in a sad and disappointed voice that she will reschedule until such a time that she would have enough cash on hand to pay for the visit.

Bougainvillea Named for French Admiral and Explorer

Bougainvillea
It is a long way from the wooded shores of the St. Lawrence River west of Quebec City to dense forests of tropical Brazil. There are also vast differences in floral discoveries. They share at least one name though—Bougainvillea.

Louis-Antoine de Bougainville (1729-1811) was stationed in North America during the Seven Years’ War. As captain of a regiment of dragoons, 1756 found him in Canada. Two years later in in fierce fighting, he was wounded. Unable to intervene in Wolfe’s successful assault on Quebec City in 1759, he was forced to surrender and, with other French officers, shipped back to France. Admired for his leadership abilities he was appointed to lead two ships on a voyage of exploration and discovery around the world 1763-69. Bougainville’s subsequent book, published in 1771, was a sensation.

By Wes Porter - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - -- Lifestyles

CRUISING THROUGH BURGUNDY

CRUISING THROUGH BURGUNDY
David Powell spent a week on the luxury hotel barge L’Impressionniste cruising through Burgundy. The Burgundy canal is one of the most attractive canals in France, winding its way through the heart of renowned vineyards, medieval towns, elegant chateaux, magnificent cathedrals, picturesque villages and wonderful local markets.

Monday mornings don’t get much better than this. I’ve had a lovely breakfast, the sun is shining and our luxury barge is about to set sail. There are 48 locks to navigate during our week on L’Impressionniste and I’m looking forward to every one!

By David Powell - Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - -- Travel

The only detox you’ll ever need (video)

WASHINGTON—People talk all the time about how they need to “detox.” And there’s a line of companies a mile long waiting to sell you juices and smoothies that claim to cleanse your body of harmful toxins. But the good news is your body is working hard to clear out toxins before you spend a dime on expensive products. Toxicology expert Raychelle Burks explains how in this kale-free episode of Reactions:

Erectile Dysfunction; But What about Female Dysfunction?

Erectile Dysfunction; But What about Female Dysfunction?
How many males would like to see their genitals shrink so it’s impossible to have sex? I bet not many. So today, the term erectile dysfunction (ED) has lost its stigma and become familiar words. Tens of thousands of males now find solace in   ED drugs. But what about women in their 40s and later years who suffer from more than a headache when sex is mentioned? This is where equality of the sexes is sadly lacking.

Maurice Chevalier used the say, “Vive la difference” about sex. But this difference presents problems at menopause for both sexes. For males menopause is less abrupt, but they can suffer from fatigue, insomnia, grumpiness, problems at work and ED.