Lifestyles:

Health and Medicine, Travel, Gardening, Pets, Automotive

Will Miller see the light?

“To all organizers and attendees of the Folsom Street Fair, their families, friends, colleagues and visitors from home and around the world, have a great day and enjoy this wonderful and exciting event.” San Francisco mayor, Gavin Newsom

By Guest Column Marsha West- Saturday, September 29, 2007 - -- Faith

Pelosi Refuses to Denounce Hateful Anti-Christian Ad

Concerned Women for America (CWA) broke the story on Tuesday about an anti-Christian promotional advertisement put together by organizers of San Francisco’s partially taxpayer funded and Hedonistic Folsom Street Fair—sponsored by Miller Brewing, Co.—which will take place this Sunday.  Over 400,000 people are expected to attend.  The ad replaces Christ and his Disciples with homosexual sadomasochists in a twisted portrayal of Da Vinci’s The Last Supper.

By Matt Barber - Saturday, September 29, 2007 - -- Faith

No-Waste Lawn & Garden

Minnesota’s motto reads L’Etoile du Nord—The Star of the North. Indeed to our American cousins it is known as the North Star State. If that is so, to judge by their website, surely one of the stellar organizations there must be the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA).

By Wes Porter - Friday, September 28, 2007 - -- Lifestyles

New Support Group For Psoriasis Patients

Sir William Osler, one of this country’s greatest physicians, remarked that no doctor thoroughly understands a disease until he suffers from it. He could have added that this also applies to patients.

Children’s Gardening

Scientists call peppers Capsicum. The word comes from Greek kapto, which means ‘to bite.’ In different shapes, colours and sizes, they have been doing just that for over 9,000 years. Some South and Central Americans liked it hot.

By Wes Porter - Friday, September 21, 2007 - -- Lifestyles

Should You Buy Organic Food?

“Do you ever buy organic food?” I asked my wife. She quickly answered, “No”. Then I asked, “Why do some people buy it?” She replied what most people say, “Because it’s free of pesticides”. But is this true? And with increasing food prices is it prudent to spend hard-earned dollars on organic farm products?

More Limericks of a Vaguely Garden Substance

Some decried our previous publication of limericks both clean and bawdy, others only the latter. Given the nature of modern clergy, the following addenda certainly might be quoted in their company. Likewise to maiden aunts, in senior citizens homes, at gardening clubs, perhaps even to a bunch of Boy Scouts—most certainly to gatherings of Girl Guides. Only the politically correct must, alas, once again suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous misfortune ...

By Wes Porter - Friday, September 14, 2007 - -- Lifestyles

New “Sahara Desert” Drug Cures Head Lice

Why am I scratching my head? It’s because I’m writing about head lice and even the thought of having this crawly beast, “Pediculosis capitis”, in my hair triggers this reaction. It also makes me understand the traumatic, emotional and embarrassed reaction of parents (and child) when they’re told, “Sarah (or Johnnie) has head lice”. Now that school has started, over a million parents in this country will hear this news. Fortunately, a new “Sahara Desert” treatment rids families of this common pest.

Gardening in September

“The first three men in the world were a gardener, a ploughman, and a grazier; and if any object that the second of these was a murderer, I desire him to consider that as soon as he was so, he quitted our profession, and turned builder,” according to the English poet Abraham Cowley (1618-67). Somewhat earlier in his play concerning the melancholy Dane Hamlet, Shakespeare opined: “There is no ancient gentlemen but gardeners, ditchers and gravediggers; they hold up Adam’s profession.” Alas, as the days shorten and high summer turns to low fall, we occasionally reflect upon how others view us.

By Wes Porter - Friday, September 7, 2007 - -- Lifestyles

Ovarian Cancer, Scaring Women Half-To-Death

It’s been said that a little knowledge is an dangerous thing. A report from The Mayo Clinic shows that this is particularly true when the subject is ovarian cancer. And it illustrates how easy it is to both inform women and worry them at the same time.