Travel and Resorts

Travel, Cruises, Resorts, Tourism

Old travel pages from 2007 and Before

Bahama Beach Holiday at Lighthouse Pointe at Grand Lucayan

Bahama Beach Holiday at Lighthouse Pointe at Grand Lucayan
With the holidays quickly approaching, and paychecks quickly disappearing, wanted to share Lighthouse Pointe at Grand Lucayan’s “Bahama Beach Holiday” offer – created to make giving the gift of travel easy and affordable. With savings up to 35 percent, one might just be tempted to “gift a getaway” to themselves, as well as someone else.

By News on the Net - Thursday, October 19, 2017 - Full Story

The 4 Barrels Walking Wine Trail

In Central Otago, New Zealand’s pinot noir heartland, you can stroll through several exceptional vineyards on a new walking wine tour: The 4 Barrels Walking Wine Trail. The self-paced, independent tour takes those interested in learning more about the wines of the region to visit four premium wine-tasting rooms. The 8-kilometre loop trail includes Misha’s Vineyard, Aurum Wines, Scott Base and Wooing Tree Vineyard, as well as captures some wonderful scenery through orchards and around Lake Dunstan.

The walking time on the trail is approximately 90 minutes in total (at an average pace) and can be completed in 3.5 hours, including tasting stops. At three of the tasting rooms, there are lunch platters available – or you have the option of bringing your own picnic and finding a scenic spot. As well as tasting Central Otago’s famous pinot noir, wine selections include pinot gris, rosé, Chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, gewürztraminer, riesling, sparkling and dessert-style wines and port. For those who prefer hops over grapes, there is a beer option at one of the tasting rooms.

The 4 Barrels Walking Wine Trail is free. The only costs that may be incurred are wine-tasting fees, as well as optional food purchases.

By News on the Net - Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - Full Story

New Waterfall Climb in New Zealand

Wildwire Wanaka’s Lord of the Rungs experience needs to be seen to be believed. It adds a new high to New Zealand’s adventure tourism experiences.

Wild, wet and 450 metres high – Wildwire Wanaka’s Lord of the Rungs is the world’s highest via ferrata waterfall climb and New Zealand’s newest adventure thrill. It opened in September.

Alongside the spectacular Twin Falls shooting down a sheer rocky hillside, near the South Island alpine resort town of Wanaka, the via ferrata system of rungs and cables rises a near perpendicular 450m above the valley floor, taking climbers on a six to seven-hour adventure that ends with a heli flight descent.

By News on the Net - Thursday, October 5, 2017 - Full Story

Magnificent and a memorable family holiday awaits you at Tehidy

Tehidy is a small village in Cornwall, near Portreath, St Ives and the coast. It is a magnificent part of the world and a memorable family holiday awaits you at Tehidy Holiday Park.

“I have ploughed everything I have made back into the holiday park,” explains director Richard Barnes, who purchased the five-acre site 10 years ago and runs it with his family. “It was pretty run down then and I set about updating it, even adding tarmac roads.” We speak during the height of the holiday season when he has 350 guests staying on site: camping, static caravans and in his selection of self-catering holiday cottages. “We keep being asked for larger cottages so we are renovating another one at the moment which will have all the bells and whistles.”

By Tim Saunders - Monday, October 2, 2017 - Full Story

Experiential Travel: Artisanal Escape at Mahekal Beach Resort

As you may know, the Frida Kahlo Museum recently opened its second location in the world on Playa del Carmen’s bustling Fifth Avenue. To celebrate, Mahekal Beach Resort crafted an experiential “Artisanal Escape” for culturally-minded travelers looking to awaken their creative spirit - available now and starting at $460/night.

For a glimpse into the brilliant mind of one of Mexico’s most iconic artists, guests enjoy a self-guided walking tour Fifth Avenue, complete with an exploration guide outlining must-see stops, ending at the Frida Kahlo Riviera Maya Museum where VIP passes await. Enthusiasts return to Mahekal to discover their artistic talents through a hands-on painting lesson at the Artisan Palapa with a local master of her craft before indulging in an interactive culinary adventure at the Mayan Culinary Casita.

By News on the Net - Tuesday, September 19, 2017 - Full Story

Celebs Love to Dine in New Zealand

With fresh, farm-to-table produce, innovative chefs and some stunning restaurant settings, it’s no surprise that international celebrities love dining in New Zealand. From pop star Taylor Swift to action man Jason Statham, check out the favourite foodie haunts of visiting celebrities.

By News on the Net - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - Full Story

“Slide Through Summer” escape.

With summer officially upon us, we wanted to reach out to share this amazing staycation as the world’s largest Marriott - Orlando World Center Marriott - invites friends and families to stop squandering vacation days and live it up with a “Slide Through Summer” escape. This amenity filled, all-inclusive two-night stay starts at $1,200 for travel now – Sept. 4, 2017, and includes two connecting guest rooms along with premium perks and endless options for entertainment for guests of all ages.

By News on the Net - Thursday, July 27, 2017 - Full Story

Attractions of Snowdonia: An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

If you are planning a visit to the UK then Snowdonia in North Wales should be on your radar!

I recently visited Snowdonia to experience some of the many attractions this amazing area has to offer.

Here are just a few of the attractions I visited on my recent trip …

Covering approximately 840 square miles, the Snowdonia National Park is truly an area of outstanding natural beauty. There are unsurpassed views with Snowdon itself peaking at 1085 metres, mountain railways, historic castles galore, pretty coastal towns to explore, wonderfully restored steam trains, woodland parks and Snowdonia’s slate heritage. For the more adventurous there are pursuits such as rock climbing, hiking and mountain biking.

By David Powell - Thursday, July 20, 2017 - Full Story

Bryce Dallas Howard’s Advice for experiencing New Zealand like a local

It’s the warm, laidback nature of Kiwis – above everything else - that made me fall in love with this beautiful place. If you want to truly experience New Zealand, you’ve got to put yourself in their shoes and embrace the Kiwi lifestyle.

Start with a good coffee
Coffee isn’t just a morning pick-me-up in New Zealand; it’s a way of life. Wellington is New Zealand’s coffee capital and my personal coffee heaven.

By News on the Net - Wednesday, July 19, 2017 - Full Story

National Hammock Day and Mahekal Beach Resort

July 22 is National Hammock Day and Mahekal Beach Resort is celebrating all month long! To slow things down a bit and keep with the spirit of “hammocking,” Mahekal is offering a “Swing in the Sun” escape - starting at $200/night and providing travelers with 30% savings along with breakfast and lunch or dinner daily, a round of signature cocktails per person/per day, $150 bonus credit for 6+ nights, early check-in and late checkout.

Unlike other high-rise or corridor accommodations in the area, hand-laid, hidden stone pathways lead guests to their private, palapa-style bungalow touting crochet hammocks swaying from the open-air terraces. Kick back and relax (cold margarita in hand, of course) with unparalleled views of the Riviera Maya jungle or Playa del Carmen’s longest stretch of beach.

By News on the Net - Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - Full Story

Wonderful and Wacky Ice Cream Flavours from New Zealand

As summer is upon us and with National Ice Cream Day fast approaching on July 16, the young at heart love to beat the heat by eating ice cream. For those with a fascination for unique ice cream flavours, there is no place in the world like Auckland’s Giapo.

Poutine Ice Cream
Giapo Grazioli has long had a soft spot for the famous Quebec comfort dish, poutine. Available now, for a limited time at his shop, at 12 Gore Street in Auckland, Giapo’s sweet and savoury version of poutine has caramel sauce as the gravy and dollops of ice cream as the cheese curds. The fries? They are still fries – organic hand-cut fries. And to introduce a bitter element that the taste buds are crying for, Grazioli has added oolong matcha tea ice cream.

By News on the Net - Wednesday, July 12, 2017 - Full Story

Travelling to Hell and Back

“It’s not a place where travellers first think of staying,” smiles Shige Takezoe, who with his wife Diana, owns Hell Barn Cottages in North Chideock.

“There are various stories about how this part of Chideock got its name. Some say Greeks came here and built a temple called Hellas but this is disputed by local historians who say the Greeks only got as far as Devon. Others believe that Christians visited on a pilgrimage and made their home here. Then of course there was the Black Death where corpses were buried in the tumuli. Basically nobody knows why it is called Hell but it’s a beautiful place,” says Shige, who purchased the holiday business with its three cottages in 1996. “It’s very much an international business with 20 per cent of holidaymakers coming from abroad as far away as India and many French and Germans regularly staying. It’s only a 12-hour drive from Munich.”

By Tim Saunders - Tuesday, July 4, 2017 - Full Story

Auckland Harbour Bridge - Permanent Multi-Coloured Lighting

The Auckland Harbour Bridge will soon have permanent multi-coloured lighting, which – in a world first – will be powered by solar energy and battery, and can be transformed into lighting displays for special events.

The iconic landmark will be the first bridge in the world to have all of its lighting – operational, structural and special event – able to be powered entirely by solar-stored energy. The LED lights will be individually controlled, capable of transforming the bridge with lighting shows for special events and occasions.

By News on the Net - Tuesday, June 13, 2017 - Full Story

Mahekal Beach Resort Launches “Catch of the Day” Program

Playa del Carmen’s Mahekal Beach Resort have just launched an all new “Catch of the Day” program offering an unmatched foodie experience. This true fish-to-fork specialty in an interactive atmosphere takes place twice-a-week when local fisherman pull right up to the Fuego beach in front of Mahekal and Executive Chef Nerey selects his menu items for the day, right off the boat, so you know it’s fresh. Diners relish everything from fresh grouper, tuna and blond fish to lobster and octopus.

By News on the Net - Monday, June 12, 2017 - Full Story

Mahekal Beach Resort: Playa del Carmen

Nestled between the dense Riviera Maya jungle and Playa del Carmen’s longest stretch of beach lies Mahekal Beach Resort, the only resort of its kind in all of Playa del Carmen. Unlike other high-rise, corridor hotels, elevators are not found at Mahekal, and the buildings are not much taller than the palm trees surrounding them. Hand-laid, hidden stone pathways lead to 196 private, palapa-style bungalows, all steps from the sweeping, sandy beach, complete with open-air terraces, crochet hammocks, personal plunge pools or outdoor moon showers. This authentic raw-luxe retreat embodies a Swiss Family Robinson feel with high-end finishes and touches of Mayan culture. Greeted with crisp Caribbean scents, lush vegetation and colorful bougainvillea, Mahekal — which means “magical” in the ancient Mayan language — offers a memorable, magical escape with on-property amenities including four sparkling swimming pools, a seaside hot tub, a Mayan-inspired Revive Spa and fitness center, Vida Aquatica Dive Center, as well as five restaurants and bars. The ultimate coastal experience is complete with a carefree, bohemian atmosphere, the look and feel of Mexico’s traditional past with thrilling adventures nearby.

By News on the Net - Thursday, June 8, 2017 - Full Story

3 Unusual Places to Stay in New Zealand

Unique accommodation is at its best in New Zealand. Kiwis are known for their creativity and ingenuity, after all. Below is a short roundup of some of the best – and most unusual – hotels in the country.

Locking Up the Charm – Jailhouse, Christchurch
Built in 1874, Jailhouse Accommodation, in Christchurch, has been a men’s prison, a women’s prison and a military camp. Decommissioned in 1999, it sat unused until 2006, when it was sentenced to life as a hostel. Many of the facility’s original features still remain – most of the rooms started life as jail cells. Tucking yourself in, you can just imagine the history of those who did time there. The 80-bed hostel contains numerous accommodation options, from dorms to a family room. Backpacker dorm beds start at $25 NZD (approx. $24 Cdn) per night.


Going Against the Grain – SiloStay, Little River
SiloStay is a striking addition to the landscape: metal silos, traditionally used to store grain, have been repurposed as accommodation and now loom above the hamlet of Little River, on Banks Peninsula, just south of Christchurch. The silos blend cutting-edge design and a commitment to the environment with a high-end accommodation you might not expect from the agricultural look of the complex. Prices start from $180 NZD (approx. $172 Cdn) per night.


Watching Over the Water – The Lighthouse, Wellington
Lighthouses are a beacon of safety and comfort for many. Being able to stay in one – that offers a distant view of New Zealand’s South Island just across the bay – is a shining example of a unique tourism opportunity. Located in the charming seaside neighbourhood of Island Bay (just 15 minutes from downtown Wellington), the Lighthouse prices start from $170 NZD (approx. $163 Cdn) per night.

By News on the Net - Monday, June 5, 2017 - Full Story

Move Over Cinco de Mayo…

While traditionally May 5 is celebrated by raising a glass of Mexican beer (or tequila), there is a different option for wine lovers – May 5 is also International Sauvignon Blanc Day.

The French may have given us the term terroir – the wonderful alchemy of influences from soil, aspect and climate that creates the unique character of a wine – but on the other side of the world, New Zealand winemakers have also shared their own kind of “magic” with the world and it has a distinctive New Zealand name.


Turangawaewae (pronounced: too-runguh-why-why) means “my place” in Maori. It describes a uniquely New Zealand approach to winemaking that includes terroir and also embraces the surrounding landscape, the characteristic weather, and the history and spirit of a place and the people who make it their home.

By News on the Net - Wednesday, May 3, 2017 - Full Story

Get Dirty at Mudtopia in Rotorua, New Zealand

Festival fans are set for an epic new mud and music experience later this year, with the announcement of the southern hemisphere’s first Mudtopia Festival, to be held in Rotorua, from December 1-3.

The three-day, high-energy festival in Arawa Park is designed to create a playful sensory experience that will awaken the world to Rotorua and the wonders of mud, by enabling people to get muddy and unleash their inner child.

Rotorua mud is extremely high in minerals, particularly silica, due to its contact with natural geothermal and mineral waters that come from deep within the earth. This high mineral content ensures that the mud stores heat easily when warmed, making it ideal for wellness treatments, as well as for the activities planned for Mudtopia.

By News on the Net - Thursday, April 13, 2017 - Full Story

A slower pace of life can be found in Suffolk

This comes as quite a surprise when you think that it is only 80 miles from London. In Suffolk there is great support for local produce and the independent trader. So much so that I am told even a well known supermarket chain has been unable to secure planning permission to build a store in Halesworth.

“The owner of the wine shop here has been trading for over 30 years,” one local entrepreneur, who has relocated from Surrey, tells me. “I was an accountant for BP for 30 years and every day as a commuter I used to leave my house in the dark and return in the dark and did not even know my next door neighbour. It’s different here; it takes me twice as long as it should to walk up the street in the morning because I’m talking to so many people.” In Suffolk there is plenty of farmland and house prices are comparatively low compared to the built up south of England, making homebuyers contemplate a move here.

By Tim Saunders - Thursday, April 13, 2017 - Full Story