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NeoStrata Wrinkle Repair

Collagen Producing Peptides For Wrinkled Skin


By —— Bio and Archives--September 30, 2007

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What made Cleopatra, Queen of Egypt, so attractive? Certainly being born beautiful wasn’t a hindrance for her seduction of Mark Anthony. But apart from having genetics on her side she knew that natural beauty could be preserved and augmented by the application of healthy emollients. Both Cleopatra and Poppea, wife of the Roman Emperor Nero, used a honey-and-milk lotion to keep them looking youthful. But what would Cleopatra and Poppea have done to get their hands on a new potion proven to reduce wrinkles up to 78 percent?

These two women were not aware of the science of cosmetics at that time. Through today’s science we know that lactic acid in milk is an alpha hydroxy acid which helps to cleanse and exfoliate the deepest levels of skin. It acts like a gentle skin peel that many women use today to restore aging skin. 

Legendary beauties who also used milk and honey mixtures didn’t understand that, since honey is composed of sugars, it also has alpha hydroxy acid like milk. In addition, honey contains phytochemicals that kill viruses and bacteria, as well as beneficial minerals and vitamins to nourish skin. 

The way our skin ages depends on several factors. North America’s frigid temperature is not kind to skin. Nor is it possible to choose our parents. But we all can be skin smart and avoid long exposure to the sun, one of the main causes of aging skin. 

Unfortunately, the aging of skin starts in our twenties when reduced collagen production causes thinning of skin and fine wrinkles. This, along with decreased concentration of glycosaminoglycans, results in dry skin and slower removal of dead skin cells. There’s also less spring-back to skin due to a loss of elastic fibers.

Also if you want to look good in your birthday suit, toss those cigarettes away. Dr. Yolanda Helfrich, Assistant Professor of Dermatology at the University of Michigan, reports that the facial skin of smokers is more wrinkled than the skin of non-smokers.

Sometimes the truth of what’s happening to us comes from the mouths of young children. A five year old recently said to a friend of ours, “Why do you have so many wrinkles?” Now there’s a remedy to fight these embarrassing moments.

So how can you put your best face forward as you age without having to concoct milk and honey potions for the Cleopatra look? The answer is to rely on scientific data, like the clinical study published in the peer reviewed medical Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology. The study tested a new class of anti-aging agents known as collagen-producing peptides, such as the ones found in NeoStrata Wrinkle Repair.

NeoStrata Wrinkle Repair contains 5% Matrixyl, a pentapeptide, a chain of five amino acids and a blend of anti-aging ingredients. This formula penetrates skin, triggers collagen production, and rebuilds skin by plumping up wrinkles from below the surface.  And it restores the tensile strength and resilience to skin that has been lost over the years.

Dr. Charles Lynde, Assistant Professor of Dermatology at the University of Toronto says, “There are a great number of cosmesceutical products available on the market said to repair wrinkles and help the aging process of skin. My patients are constantly looking for solutions to help improve these concerns. NeoStrata surpassed my patient’s expectations. That’s enough to convince me of the product’s effectiveness.”

So how good is NeoStrata Wrinkle Repair? The study published in Cosmetic Dermatology reported that volunteers used the cream twice a day for three months. During that time the effect on wrinkles was analyzed by a computerized digital-imaging-processing system.

At the end of 12 weeks there was a reduction in wrinkles of up to 78 percent. Unlike other procedures to decrease wrinkles there were no distressing side effects.

Unfortunately this news is too late for the Queen of Egypt, but not for you.

Today many women are lining up for plastic surgery or flocking to get Botox injections which are invasive procedures and not without complications. But to me this has always seemed a radical way to treat aging. And I hope this column shows medical consumers that it makes more sense to use cosmeceuticals to erase wrinkled skin.



Dr. Gifford Jones -- Bio and Archives | Comments

W. Gifford-Jones M.D is the pen name of Dr. Ken Walker graduate of Harvard. Dr. Walker’s website is: Docgiff.com

My book, “90 + How I Got There” can be obtained by sending $19.95 to:
Giff Holdings, 525 Balliol St, Unit # 6,Toronto, Ontario, M4S 1E1

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