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Israeli researchers say monitoring the motion of eyelids can help diagnose eye diseases and neurological diseases, including Parkinson’s.

How your eyelids move is a clue to diagnosing disease


By —— Bio and Archives--October 18, 2017

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What do your eyes say? An eyelid motion monitor (EMM) under advanced development at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa can diagnose certain diseases.

Not yet commercialized, the device – which attaches to standard refraction glasses used in eye exams — already has won several international awards and was ranked in the top 20 in the Texas Instruments Innovation Challenge – Europe Design Contest.

Over the past two years, a prototype of the device has been used in clinical trials at Emek Medical Center in Afula under the direction of Dr. Daniel Briscoe, ophthalmology department head.

The EMM was first developed by Technion Prof. Levi Schachter and doctoral student Adi Hanuka in the Technion’s Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering. Hanuka began working on it as an undergraduate and continued development during her graduate studies with the help of a team of students.

“Eyelid motion provides us with meaningful information about the health of a patient,” explained Hanuka. “This motion can indicate not only eye diseases, but also neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s, and autoimmune diseases such as Grave’s.”

A full report about the project was published recently in Graefe’s Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology.

The hardware-and-software system monitors and interprets eyelid movements based on the measurements of approximately 100 healthy subjects collected in order to define normal eyelid motion patterns (blinking speed and frequency). Eyelid motions were analyzed using a signal-processing algorithm written by students Tal Berkowitz, Michal Spector, Shir Laufer and Naama Pearl.—More…



ISRAEL21c -- Bio and Archives | Comments

ISRAEL21c was founded in 2001, in the wake of the Second Intifada, to broaden public understanding of Israel beyond typical portrayals in the mainstream media.

The organization’s founders – Israeli-American technology executives – understood the great power of the Internet and developed a first-of-its kind online product with global appeal and reach.

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