Canadian News and Politics

Canadian News and Opinion, Canadian News, Canadian Politics, Conservative News and Politics

Trudeau compares ISIS fighters to Greek, Italian, Portuguese immigrants

Trudeau compares ISIS fighters to Greek, Italian, Portuguese immigrants
This was bad. Even for him.

On Thursday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau held one of his town hall meetings. The PM is currently crisscrossing the country in an attempt to bolster his sinking popularity. While many things coming out of the mouth of the most unqualified prime minister in history are bad, this comment was particularly disgusting.

Related: Justin Trudeau: Maybe he is just really, really stupid

By Arthur Weinreb - Sunday, February 4, 2018 - Full Story

Why Doug Ford Has a Great Shot to Win the Ontario PC Leadership

Why Doug Ford Has a Great Shot to Win the Ontario PC Leadership
The winds of change seem to be blowing in Doug Ford’s favor. The Ontario people have experienced 15 years of McGuinty-led then Wynne-led Ontario Liberal corruption, scandal, fiscal mismanagement+ incompetence. The mighty province of Ontario has gone from being an anchor of Confederation and a “have” province, to a “have-not” province.

The provincial debt is a staggering $400 billion+. Over $12 billion must be paid to service that debt alone. With interest rates going up in the US and in Canada, those annual debt payments will skyrocket. Utility costs, both for homeowners, landlord/tenants and businesses have increased tragically under the Liberal government.

By Mitch Wolfe - Sunday, February 4, 2018 - Full Story

Recession could push federal deficit to between $46 and $120 billion by 2020/21

Recession could push federal deficit to between $46 and $120 billion by 2020/21
VANCOUVER—With the federal government running deficits during times of positive economic growth, Ottawa’s annual deficit could reach $120 billion in the next few years if Canada enters a recession, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“By running deficits in good times, if and when Canada’s economy slows down—or worse, hits a recession—there’s a very real risk Canada’s existing deficits could grow substantially,” said Jason Clemens, executive vice-president of the Fraser Institute and co-author of Federal Deficits and Recession: What Could Happen.

By Fraser Institute - Thursday, February 1, 2018 - Full Story

Canadian Courts are Correcting Course on Intellectual Property Issues

Canadian Courts are Correcting Course on Intellectual Property Issues
OTTAWA, ON--  Canadian courts, in particular the Supreme Court of Canada, have in recent years issued intellectual property (IP) judgments that were problematic, even erroneous, Munk Senior Fellow Richard Owens said today. This has led some observers to claim that there is a trend to the courts favouring users’ rights over creators’ rights.

These problematic decisions have had serious consequences, including invalidating patents on important drugs, and encouraging widespread copying of educational publications. They have suppressed innovation and removed billions of dollars from Canada’s economy. But, as Owens’ latest MLI paper makes clear, a series of more recent decisions has reaffirmed the courts’ proper, strong defence for IP rights. The paper, released today and titled “Straightened Up and Flying Right: Canadian Courts Offer Renewed Support of IP Rights,” is about the process of error and correction that we have seen in recent years.

By Macdonald Laurier Institute - Thursday, February 1, 2018 - Full Story

CTF releases federal pre-budget submission

CTF releases federal pre-budget submission
OTTAWA, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) today released its 2018 pre-budget submission to the federal government.

The CTF is calling on the Trudeau government to return to a balanced budget, pay down federal debt, abandon its ill-advised carbon tax and put an end to corporate welfare spending.

“The Liberals campaigned on ‘modest’ deficits leading to $25 billion in new debt,” said Wudrick, “Instead, we’re on track for at least $80 billion in additional debt, with absolutely no plan to get back to balance. This government needs to put forward a plan to get back to balance and start reducing the debt load on future generations.”

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Aaron Wudrick, Federal Director- Thursday, February 1, 2018 - Full Story

Christian Leaders Ask Prime Minister to Withdraw Identity Test Canada Summer Jobs

Christian Leaders Ask Prime Minister to Withdraw Identity Test Canada Summer Jobs
Date: Wednesday, Jan 31, 2018
Time: 10:30 AM
Location: Parliament, Ottawa, Charles Lynch Press Room

Speakers: Dr. Charles McVety, President Canada Christian College and School of Graduate Theological Studies
Dr. Rondo Thomas, Director, Evangelical Association
Dr. Peter Marshall, President, Canadian Religious Broadcasters
Dr. Eferem Leakermarian , Ethiopian Evangelical Association
Pastor Tony Soldano,  All Peoples Church
Dr. David Loganathan, President, Tamil Pastors Association

By News on the Net - Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - Full Story

The role of the media in the demise of Patrick Brown

The role of the media in the demise of Patrick Brown
Of all the blame dished out surrounding the resignation of Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown, the media seems to be getting a pass in their role in the scandal that rocked the party.

Wednesday night, Brown spoke at a hastily called press conference. He had been contacted by CTV News about two hours before. He was told the network was airing a story later that night alleging he engaged in sexual misconduct with two young women years before and given the opportunity to speak to these allegations.

Brown, almost in tears, vigorously denied these allegations, said he has contacted his attorneys and will fight to clear his name. He made no mention of stepping down as leader. The Ontario election is scheduled to be held on June 7 of this year.

By Arthur Weinreb - Sunday, January 28, 2018 - Full Story

The Rapid Fall of Pat Brown and the Sudden Rise of Princess Caroline Mulroney

The Rapid Fall of Pat Brown and the Sudden Rise of Princess Caroline Mulroney
The King is Dead- Long Live the New Princess Caroline Mulroney.

Politics is a dirty, dirty, dirty, zero-sum, winner take all business. Or to paraphrase my favorite cynical political philosopher, Thomas Hobbes, “Ontario Conservative politics since the Harris era, is solitary, poor, nasty, brutish and short”. 

One day Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown is cruising to a sure minority or majority political victory. The next day, his political career is destroyed over allegations of sexual misconduct by two anonymous women.

By Mitch Wolfe - Sunday, January 28, 2018 - Full Story

Patrick Brown Resigns – Trillium Party Popularity Continues to Rise

Patrick Brown Resigns
We’ve had some news today that is really shaking up Politics in Ontario.

The Trillium Party of Ontario is concerned that we are having ANOTHER view into what is a very damaged political world in Ontario.

“The Trillium Party started because we wanted to bring a sense of fairness, civility, decency, freedom, democracy, and true representation to Ontario politics.  We have done that through our current slate of candidates, as well as through the actions and voting record of our sitting MPP, Jack MacLaren.

By News on the Net - Friday, January 26, 2018 - Full Story

Canada falls out of top 10 freest countries, U.S. up seven spots to 17th

Canada falls out of top 10 freest countries, U.S. up seven spots to 17th
TORONTO—Canada is no longer one of the 10 freest countries in the world, having dropped from fourth to 11th in the new Human Freedom Index, released today by the Fraser Institute and a network of international public policy think-tanks.

The United States, which ranked 24th last year, climbed to 17th in the most recent report, which uses 79 indicators of personal, civil and economic freedoms to rank 159 countries and territories around the world.

By Fraser Institute - Thursday, January 25, 2018 - Full Story

Justin Trudeau: Maybe he is just really, really stupid

Justin Trudeau: Maybe he is just really, really stupid
Most Canadians who do not spend their evenings drinking the Liberal Party Kool Aid do not like the way Justin Trudeau is running the country. They realize as leaders and politicians go, he is not the sharpest knife in the drawer. But it is possible even these people are actually overestimating his intelligence. As far as his mental abilities are concerned, he is probably a lot worse than most of us think he is.

In a Toronto Sun column, Lorne Gunter wrote everything Trudeau does is done because he is “naïve.” The major problem with the columnist’s thinking is he is being too kind to the selfie-taking Sock Boy. As far as naiveté goes, Trudeau is looking at it in the rear view mirror. The reality is he is simply not bright enough to hold any job requiring more intelligence than his work experience before entering politics required; part time drama teacher, snowboard instructor and bouncer.

By Arthur Weinreb - Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - Full Story

Trudeau’s Summer Jobs Ideology Test Will Damage Students and Children

Trudeau's Summer Jobs Ideology Test Will Damage Students and Children
The Canada Summer Jobs program provides over $200 million per year to fund some 70,000 students with seasonal employment.  Just before Christmas, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau changed the requirements for funding which now demands that applicants and employers sign a document to attest that they support “women’s reproductive rights, and the rights of gender-diverse and transgender Canadians.” 

Dr. Charles McVety, President of Canada Christian College and School of Graduate Theological Studies and the Evangelical Association, says “I am very concerned about the children who will be hurt by Trudeau’s ideological test as their favourite camp worker will be rejected for not swearing to support abortion.  It is sad to think of the thousands of Christian students will lose their summer jobs for not attesting to multiple genders, jobs they depend upon to pay for fall tuition.  All so the Prime Minister can flex his muscles to force young people to bow to his decrees.”

McVety goes on to say “Christian leaders from across the country representing several million Canadians are asking Prime Minister Trudeau to withdraw his attack on Christians and come to the table to discuss how to best support students with freedom and equality while recognizing that bible believing Christians will be able to swear support abortion or multiple genders. This Christians Need Not Apply approach will not be tolerated under section 15 of the Charter or by the court of public opinion”.

By Dr. Charles McVety - Tuesday, January 23, 2018 - Full Story

Canada has almost 20 per cent fewer doctors per capita than OECD average

Canada has almost 20 per cent fewer doctors per capita than OECD average
VANCOUVER—The number of doctors in Canada (per person) lags far behind other developed countries, and if current trends continue, Canada likely won’t close the gap in the coming years, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Physicians play a crucial role in Canada’s health-care system, but compared to other developed countries, Canada has a low ratio of physicians to people,” said Steven Globerman, international business professor at Western Washington University, Fraser Institute senior fellow and co-author of The Supply of Physicians in Canada: Projections and Assessment.

By Fraser Institute - Thursday, January 18, 2018 - Full Story

Unemployment rate now less reflective of overall labour market performance due to demographics

Unemployment rate now less reflective of overall labour market performance due to demographics

VANCOUVER—A falling unemployment rate will not necessarily indicate a healthy growing labour market in the future, in part because Canada’s population is getting older and more Canadians are retiring from the workforce, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Historically, the unemployment rate and the employment rate worked in tandem—when one went up, the other went down—but that’s not always true anymore,” said Jason Clemens, executive vice-president of the Fraser Institute and co-author of Why the Unemployment Rate is No Longer a Reliable Gauge of Labour Market Performance.

By Fraser Institute - Tuesday, January 16, 2018 - Full Story

Will universal daycare come to Ontario?


Economics is not an exact science. This is why President Harry Truman asked for a one-armed economist because he was tired of being told “on the one hand…, but on the other hand…” But it is basic Economics 101 that if a business’s costs increase, that business will end up raising its prices.

On Jan. 1, 2018, Ontario’s minimum wage increased from $11.60 an hour to $14 an hour, an increase of 21 percent. And this percentage does not include related increases employers must pay for contribution to their employees’ costs for Employment Insurance and the Canada Pension Plan. Also not included in the increase are other wage hikes employers will have to give their workers who made more than $11.60 an hour at the end of 2017 but less than the now minimum wage. This large increase is a disaster for the province.

By Arthur Weinreb - Monday, January 15, 2018 - Full Story

Opioids in Canada: One-in-eight have family or close friends who faced addiction

Angus Reid Opiod Pol
January 11, 2018 – The thousands of deaths across Canada as a result of opioid use and addiction has been a dominating public health, public safety, and public policy issue for more than two years.

Beyond the headlines and the grim statistics, a new public opinion poll from the Angus Reid Institute finds this nationwide epidemic striking close to home for a significant number of Canadians. One-in-eight (12%) – the equivalent of nearly 3.5 million Canadian adults – say they have close friends or family members who have become dependent on opioids in the last five years.

By Angus Reid Institute - Thursday, January 11, 2018 - Full Story

CPP tax increase and Ottawa’s income tax changes mean higher taxes for virtually every Canadia

 CPP tax increase and Ottawa’s income tax changes mean higher taxes for virtually every Canadian family  class=
VANCOUVER—More than 90 per cent of Canadian families with children will pay higher taxes once the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) tax increases are fully implemented, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The first of seven increases to the CPP tax, which all workers must pay, will start this time next year.

By Fraser Institute - Thursday, January 11, 2018 - Full Story

Mayor needs to make sure taxpayers aren’t stuck with union bills

United Fire Fighters of Winnipeg president Alex Forrest
REGINA, SK: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) is calling on the City of Winnipeg to establish a clear and firm policy to ensure that taxpayers aren’t paying the bills for unions.

“It’s bad enough to find out taxpayers are footing the bill for 60 per cent of the salary for the firefighters’ union president who is on leave from the city, but it’s even worse to find out the mayor and council didn’t even know about the one-sided deal,” said Todd MacKay, Prairie Director for the CTF. “Taxpayers shouldn’t have to cover the costs on both sides of the bargaining table – the City of Winnipeg needs to get a handle on the situation and make it clear: unions need to pay their own bills.”

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Todd MacKay – CTF Prairie Director- Thursday, January 11, 2018 - Full Story

Canada’s biggest cities much less dense than other major U.S., international urban centres

Canada’s biggest cities much less dense than other major U.S., international urban centres
TORONTO—Canadian cities—including Toronto and Vancouver, which are experiencing an affordability crunch—can accommodate much more housing supply as they have much lower population densities than other major urban centres around the world, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Compared to their international peers, Canadian cities have much lower levels of density, and thus an ability to expand the supply of housing,” said Josef Filipowicz, senior policy analyst with the Fraser Institute’s Centre for Municipal Studies and author of Room To Grow: Comparing Urban Density in Canada and Abroad.

By Fraser Institute - Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - Full Story

How Tim Horton’s Blew it Bigtime!

 HOW TIM HORTONS BLEW IT BIGTIME
No matter how destructive you think Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne’s idea was to increase the province’s minimum wage law a whopping amount, a couple of Tim Hortons’ franchisees and the franchisor played it wrong. In the end, with the help of the business-hating media, Wynne has emerged the winner in the battle over whether the increase in the minimum wage is good or bad.

Ontario’s Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017, took effect on Jan. 1 (You know a law can’t be good when it contains the word “fair.”) Among its provisions, the provinces minimum wage increased from $1l.60 an hour to $14. Under the legislation the minimum wage is set to increase again to $15 an hour in January 2019. Although businesses should and do expect minimum wages to increase as other prices do, the 2018 increase represents a 23% increase in low wage levels. As employers have to contribute to the employees Canada pension and Employment insurance payments, the cost to these employers will be more than just the $2.40 increase in the hourly wage.

By Arthur Weinreb - Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - Full Story