Global Warming-Energy-Environment

global warming, Climategate, environment, environmentalists, activists, scare tactics, greens, Kyoto, carbon dioxide, facts and myths, greenhouse gases, United Nations report on climate change, Debunking, Energy, Oil, Gas, Fracking, EPA, Energy, oil drilling, gas, nuclear power, food scares, genetically modified food, organic food

Lithium Supercycle

The truth, in regards to the world’s mineral resources, is that we in the western developed countries are usually not in control of supply.

“The spectre of resource insecurity has come back with a vengeance. The world is undergoing a period of intensified resource stress, driven in part by the scale and speed of demand growth from emerging economies and a decade of tight commodity markets. Poorly designed and short-sighted policies are also making things worse, not better. Whether or not resources are actually running out, the outlook is one of supply disruptions,  volatile prices, accelerated environmental degradation and rising political tensions over resource access.” Chatham House, Resources Futures

By Rick Mills - Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - Full Story

Clean Power Plan Repeal: Myths vs. Reality

With EPA administrator Scott Pruitt’s announcement that the Trump Administration was formally proposing repeal of the so-called “Clean Power Plan” (CPP), certain voices in the blogosphere and media predictably went nuts. In the formal response from IER, we have already applauded the announcement as promoting liberty in energy markets and keeping energy more affordable for American households. In the present post, let me further respond to some of the (hysterical) reactions that are based on myths.

By Institute for Energy Research - Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - Full Story

Environmentalist Policies Are Exacerbating Wildfires. It’s Time to Rethink Forest Management

Massive wildfires continue to rage out of control in Northern California, causing historic loss of life and billions of dollars in damage.

The images coming out of California towns, which look like bombed-out cities from World War II, are a sobering reminder of man’s occasional futility in the face of nature unleashed.

Stopping these huge blazes is, of course, a priority. The firefighters who have been battling these infernos have at times done a miraculous job under extremely difficult circumstances.—More….

By Heritage Foundation - Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - Full Story

Goodbye to Gasoline…

Have you seen headlines like “Say Goodbye to Oil, Gas, & Solar…,” or “The new Gasoline,” courtesy of Goldman-Sachs (Snopes), or “Holy Grail of Fuels Found,” and other salivations about “alternative” new energy sources?

Such posts typically come with claims like “... 1,693X more powerful than gasoline ...” or “it could power your car for over 50 years on one tank… and it “could make OPEC completely obsolete.”

They all sound as if there is (are) new type(s) of energy SOURCES, that could provide near limitless energy, presumably also at next to no cost. Claims and promises of an energy-Nirvana, right here on earth, ready to exploit next week or soon thereafter?

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Sunday, October 15, 2017 - Full Story

The Obama EPA’s crooked prosecutors

Suppose a crooked prosecutor framed someone and was determined to get a conviction. So he built an entire case on tainted, circumstantial evidence, and testimony from witnesses who had their reasons for wanting the guy in jail. Suppose the prosecutor ignored or hid exculpatory evidence and colluded with the judge to prevent the defendant from presenting a robust defense or cross-examining adverse witnesses.

You know what would happen—at least in a fair and just society. The victim would be exonerated and compensated. The prosecutor and judge would be disbarred, fined and jailed.

By Paul Driessen - Sunday, October 15, 2017 - Full Story

Surprising Pollution From Trees

Forests have been called the lungs of the Earth because growing trees remove carbon dioxide from the air and replace it with oxygen. Planting trees is often touted as a strategy to make cities greener, cleaner and healthier.

However, there is some degree of pollution associated with trees.

By Jack Dini - Saturday, October 14, 2017 - Full Story

China’s New Environmental Problem: Battery Disposal

In 2016, China became the world’s largest electric vehicle market accounting for over 40 percent of the electric vehicles sold worldwide. China passed the United States which had the highest electric vehicle sales in 2015. In 2016, China had over 1 million electric vehicles, which was an 87 percent increase over the previous year. They added 336,000 new electric car registrations; this included battery only and hybrid models. Electric vehicles range in price from $6,000 to $200,000 (for the most expensive Tesla model). 1 Like several European countries, China is planning to ban the sale of gasoline and diesel vehicles in favor of electric vehicles at an unannounced date.

By Institute for Energy Research - Saturday, October 14, 2017 - Full Story

What Do People Think About Climate Change?

A national research project sponsored by the Institute for Energy Research and the American Conservative Union Foundation consisting of ten focus groups and a nationwide survey (1018 registered voters, margin of error 3.1%) discovered that:

There is little enthusiasm for taxing energy. When asked about a tax on carbon dioxide, 44% of respondents opposed, while 39% favored. More importantly, when asked whether they trusted the federal government to spend the money from such a tax wisely just 18% said they did, while 74% said they did not.

By Institute for Energy Research - Friday, October 13, 2017 - Full Story

World Bank “Abandons The Poor”

London,  A new report: The Anti-Development Bank: The World Bank’s Regressive Energy Policies by the London-based Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF) finds that the World Bank has abdicated its primary mission of tackling poverty in the developing world.

The report, written by author and former Treasury adviser Rupert Darwall, with a foreword by the distinguished economist and former World Bank research administrator, Professor Deepak Lal, comes as ministers travel to Washington, DC to attend the annual World Bank meeting.

By News on the Net - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - Full Story

Ensuring a Resilient Grid Requires Less Government, Not More

On Friday September 29th, the Department of Energy released a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking proposing a rule for action by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The notice calls on FERC to create new rules for how grid operators value “reliability and resilience” in electricity generation. While the proposed rule is limited in specifics, the essence of the proposal is to guarantee cost recovery for “fuel-secure” power generation units, defined as units with a 90-day fuel supply stored on site. While no specific types of generation units are mentioned, this on-site storage definition would likely apply to coal-fired, nuclear, and hydropower generation facilities.

By Institute for Energy Research - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - Full Story

IER Response to EPA’s Clean Power Plan Repeal Proposal

WASHINGTON — Institute for Energy Research President Thomas Pyle has issued the following statement regarding EPA’s proposed repeal of its existing source rule, commonly known as the Clean Power Plan, in accordance with President Trump’s energy independence executive order:

“The Clean Power Plan was never about clean power. The nation’s electricity generation fleet is already very clean and getting cleaner—as shown by the nearly 70-percent reduction in criteria pollutants since 1970. The plan was really about instituting more federal control over a dispersed system and driving up the cost of reliable electricity in line with the previous administration’s climate ideology. The result would have been residents in more than 40 states experiencing double-digit percentage increases in their electricity rates by 2030. For that reason, we preferred to call it the Creating Poverty Plan.

“Beyond its implications in terms of dollars and cents, the plan wasn’t cooperative federalism as EPA claimed, but coercive federalism and a misapplication of the Clean Air Act. It extended EPA power in unprecedented ways and marked a clear deviation from the agency’s traditional role. IER commends EPA for its decision to rescind this harmful rule. This is a major victory for American families because it enables all of us to continue reaping the benefits of the affordable energy we need to power our lives and grow the economy.”

 

By Institute for Energy Research - Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - Full Story

The “Amazon Effect” Is Coming To Oil Markets

While OPEC mulls over further steps to once again support falling oil prices, tech startups are quietly ushering in a new era in oil and gas: the era of the digital oil field.

Much talk has revolved around how software can completely transform the energy industry, but until recently, it was just talk. Now, things are beginning to change, and some observers, such as Cottonwood Venture Partners’ Mark P. Mills, believe we are on the verge of an oil industry transformation of proportions identical to the transformation that Amazon prompted in retail.

By Oilprice.com --Irina Slav- Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - Full Story

Wood Burning Pollution

The use of wood for electricity generation and heat in modern technologies has grown rapidly in recent years. For its supporters, it represents a relatively cheap and flexible way of supplying renewable energy with benefits to global climate and to forest industries. For its critics, Duncan Brack adds this important observation, “Overall while some instances of biomass energy use may result in lower life-cycle emissions than fossil fuels, in most circumstances, comparing technologies of similar ages, the use of woody biomass for energy will release higher levels of emissions than coal and considerably higher levels than gas.” 1

By Jack Dini - Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - Full Story

Politicized sustainability threatens planet and people

Sustainability (sustainable development) is one of the hottest trends on college campuses, in the news media, in corporate boardrooms and with regulators. There are three different versions.

Real Sustainability involves thoughtful, caring, responsible, economical stewardship and conservation of land, water, energy, metallic, forest, wildlife and other natural resources. Responsible businesses, families and communities practice this kind of sustainability every day: polluting less, recycling where it makes sense, and using less energy, water and raw materials to manufacture the products we need.

By Paul Driessen - Sunday, October 8, 2017 - Full Story

Can Mali Maintain Its Gold Mining Status?

Mali’s gold exports are falling, and new discoveries aren’t enough to make up for the loss of its giant legacy mines, where production is already dead or winding down, and the fate of one of the biggest of them all—Sadiola—now hangs in the balance.

The world-class Sadiola gold mine needs an investment of $380 million to keep it open for another 10 years, accessing 3.4 million ounces in reserves.

By Oilprice.com -- Joao Peixe- Friday, October 6, 2017 - Full Story

Hockey Stick Revisited

The hockey stick is the nickname given to a temperature graph that became the central icon of the 2001 publication of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). It purported to show that temperature had been roughly stable from the year 1000 AD until the 20th century—after which it began to shoot up dramatically. The flattish part of the line reminded people of the long handle of an ice hockey stick at rest, while the uptick resembled the blade, reports Donna Laframboise. 1

The 2001 graph profoundly influenced world energy and environmental policies. It has appeared in a variety of government documents and featured prominently in the documentary film version of Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth.

By Jack Dini - Friday, October 6, 2017 - Full Story

UN Head Offers Misleading Data on Hurricanes and Climate Change


The United Nations is manipulating statistics to try and prove a causal relationship between the reported increase in carbon dioxide concentrations and the purported increase in extreme hurricane events over the last several decades, focusing in particular on the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. “Over the past 30 years, the number of annual weather-related disasters has nearly tripled, and economic losses have quintupled,” UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres said at a press briefing on Wednesday. To “prove” his point, graphs were distributed to reporters that show carbon dioxide concentration levels and ocean temperatures rising since 1960, together with an increase in the number of meteorological natural disasters. “Scientists are learning more and more about the links between climate change and extreme weather,” the Secretary General added. He then predictably called for “countries to implement the Paris Agreement [on climate change], and with greater ambition.”

By Joseph A. Klein - Friday, October 6, 2017 - Full Story

The United States Needs to Maintain Its Existing Electricity Sources

A recent study by analytics firm IHS Markit and co-sponsored by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce shows the importance of our current mix of coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy generating capacity. The report, ‘Ensuring Resilient and Efficient Electricity Generation, found that the current mix of electricity resources is saving our nation $114 billion annually in electricity costs, lowering the cost of electricity by 27 percent. Without significant contributions from nuclear and coal generation, the study found that the price of electricity would increase and the higher prices could lead to the loss of 1 million jobs, the loss of $158 billion to our economy within 3 years and the loss of up to $845 in disposable income for every U.S. household each year.

By Institute for Energy Research - Thursday, October 5, 2017 - Full Story

New York’s Clean Energy Standard: Costly and Ineffective

A recent report evaluated New York State’s clean energy programs and found them costing the state’s consumers and businesses over $1 trillion with no measurable impact on world climate.1 Thus, the carbon dioxide reductions that would cost the state’s residents heavily would have no value. This is nothing new; New York finds numerous ways to tax its people with little benefit to show for it.

By Institute for Energy Research - Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - Full Story

The Next Big Offshore Boom Is About To Happen Here

Say what you will about offshore oil and gas exploration, but it’s still alive and kicking—high production costs and all. The latest demonstration of the viability of deepwater projects, even in the post-2014 oil industry era, comes from none other than Brazil.

On Wednesday, the country’s National Petroleum Agency put 287 oil and gas blocks up for auction, and only 37 found buyers. Too few, it might seem at first. But the proceeds came in at more than US$1.2 billion—a hefty share of this pledged by heavyweight Exxon. The NPA’s expectations for the proceeds were much more modest, at $157 million.

By Oilprice.com -- Irina Slav- Wednesday, October 4, 2017 - Full Story