Global Warming-Energy-Environment

global warming, Climategate, environment, environmentalists, activists, scare tactics, greens, Kyoto, carbon dioxide, facts and myths, greenhouse gases, United Nations report on climate change, Debunking, Energy, Oil, Gas, Fracking, EPA, Energy, oil drilling, gas, nuclear power, food scares, genetically modified food, organic food

Party Time for Climateers

Party Time for Climateers
The climate warriors are holding yet another Global Warming Jamboree in Bonn. We can expect an orchestrated flood of frightening forecasts to support their alarmist agenda.

Naturally they will not use carbon energy to get there.

For 23 years they have maintained these shindigs with no effect on the climate but causing great harm to many ordinary people - soaring costs for unreliable subsidised green electricity, loss of manufacturing and mining jobs, and increased food costs caused by high power prices and using food for ethanol/biodiesel.

Climate alarm is just a cover story. The glittering goal they seek is world government directed by unelected officials and funded by a global carbon tax.

What has kept these unproductive conferences alive for so long?

The money is great, the parties are fun, and the prize is power.

By Viv Forbes - Thursday, November 9, 2017 - Full Story

CA Gov. Jerry Brown’s War Against Reality… and the Climate

CA Gov. Jerry Brown's War Against Reality… and the Climate
California Gov. Jerry Brown says the world needs ‘brain washing’ on climate change. Sounding indeed brainwashed, Brown said, “The problem ... is us. It’s our whole way of life. It’s our comfort ... It’s the greed. It’s the indulgence. It’s the pattern. And it’s the inertia.”

I hate to be a party pooper but the totalitarian trio of Stalin, Mao and Pol Pot also said the world needed brainwashing. But I digress.

Brown arrived at the Vatican in Rome Friday for 14 days of “climate talks.” Yet Sacrament Bee reporter Christopher Cadelago, who usually is comfortable sharing opinions, twisted himself into a pretzel trying to explain Brown’s dictatorial statements. Brown “said the path to transformational change must include the mass mobilization of the religious and theological sphere, but also the prophetic sphere,” Cadelago wrote.

By Katy Grimes - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - Full Story

Southeast Asia’s Coal Demand Boom

Southeast Asia's Coal Demand Boom
Because coal is the most affordable technology for electric generation in many parts of the world, coal-fired capacity is still being built. According to the International Energy Agency (IEA) in its Southeast Asia Energy Outlook 2017, almost 100 gigawatts of new coal-fired generating capacity is expected to come online in Southeast Asia by 2040—more than doubling the region’s current coal-fired capacity.1  (See graph below.) The agency expects Southeast Asia and India to account for the majority of the new coal demand as those economies continue to grow and their demand for electricity increases. Despite some countries shuttering coal-fired power plants and cancelling new plants, IEA expects global coal-fired capacity to increase by about 50 percent over today’s levels by 2040.2

By Institute for Energy Research - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - Full Story

Cleaning up aquatic pollution with mussels

Cleaning up aquatic pollution with mussels
Scientists and activists alike have been looking for a solution to the problem of aquatic nutrient pollution. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that ribbed mussels are up to the clean-up challenge.

When it comes to nutrients, like nitrogen and phosphorus, too much of a good thing can be bad. These nutrients end up in rivers and streams as the result of human activities and can cause algal blooms, loss of seagrass and low oxygen levels, which can lead to large numbers of fish and other organisms dying.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - Full Story

Wind Speed Is Slowing Down

Wind Speed Is Slowing Down
Worldwide wind speeds have slowed down by about half a kilometer per hour (0.3 miles per hour) since the 1960s according to researchers. 31

The phenomenon is known as ‘stilling’, and scientists are not sure why it is happening. They speculate that it may have something to do with urbanization, climate change and cumulus clouds. But then researchers admit: “Or it could be due to aging wind speed instruments producing inaccurate results.”

By Jack Dini - Monday, November 6, 2017 - Full Story

Initial Thoughts on the GOP Tax Bill

House Republicans today unveiled their much-anticipated tax bill, which contains the most extensive reform of the tax code since the landmark 1986 overhaul. Although we have not fully digested the details, we can offer some initial observations from the perspective of IER’s focus on free energy markets.

What’s In a Name?

H.R. 1 is aptly titled “The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.” This is consistent with President Trump’s campaign rhetoric, as well as the familiar theme of conservative and libertarian policymakers that prosperity occurs by unleashing American entrepreneurs and returning resources to the private sector.

By Institute for Energy Research - Friday, November 3, 2017 - Full Story

EPA chief Pruitt receiving constant death threats; Dems say he deserves them, shouldn’t be protected

EPA chief Pruitt receiving constant death threats; Dems say he deserves them, shouldn't be protected
Never forget that government is the secular left’s god, and they believe they have a divine right to be in control of it - especially the levers of government they consider especially important in bringing the private sector to heel. The Environmental Protection Agency falls into that category, so it’s sacrilege to the left that someone like Scott Pruitt - who doesn’t believe the EPA should be used to flog and harass industry - is now its chief.

That’s the equivalent, to them, of making Anton LaVey your pastor.

By Dan Calabrese - Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

The changing world energy economy

The changing world energy economy
In recent years, particularly in the United States, we have seen substantial a change in public opinion regarding the production and distribution of energy, as well as its associated costs in the marketplace.

A good deal of that opinion can be attributed to publicity behind the push for green energy, coupled with misunderstandings of how energy is provided and paid for. However, the actual market changes that are occurring are more related to general business considerations, not public opinion.

By Guest Column -- James E. Smith and Alex Hatch- Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

Citizen’s energy dialog a disgrace

Gospel in, gospel out.  That is how I would describe the booklet “Citizen Dialogue on Canada’s Energy Future”, published by the British Columbia-based Simon Fraser University Centre for Dialogue.  I was one of 30 citizens who attended the Centre’s Vancouver dialogue, which was one of five federally-funded dialogues that took place across Canada prior to a combined dialogue held in Winnipeg between October 11 – 13.  The booklet was required reading for participants in this $1 million project.

The booklet made it clear that the outcome of the dialogues was predetermined from the start.  All of its assumptions were slanted towards the flawed idea that carbon dioxide (CO2) is bad and anthropogenic CO2 even worse.  Greenhouse gases were mentioned throughout, but never defined.  There was no mention of water vapour in the booklet.  Yet Environment Canada itself states, “The most important naturally occurring greenhouse gas is water vapour and it is the largest contributor to the natural greenhouse effect.” Water vapour is 95% by volume of all the greenhouse gases.

By Guest Column -- Patrick Hunt- Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

To the Corn-Farming CLIMATE Protectors—especially in Iowa and Illinois

Corn, ethanol
Greetings to you, with my hope that you are doing well! According to public records, most of you are. That’s good!

The whole U.S. produces somewhere around 15 billion bushels (BB) of corn a year at a rate of ca. 145 bushels per acre. Roughly, that’s 1/3 of the entire world production. Nearly 1/3 of the entire U.S. production comes from Iowa (2.7 BB), Illinois (2.3 BB), Nebraska (1.7 BB), Minnesota (1.5 BB), and Indiana (0.9 BB). Of that bountiful harvest, in the order of 25% are being converted via fermentation and distillation into ethanol, resulting in ~2.9 gallons of ethanol per bushel of corn.

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - Full Story

U.S. to Become a Major LNG Exporter

U.S. to Become a Major LNG Exporter
There is currently only one operational liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal in the United States; it has been operating since early 2016. Cheniere Energy is exporting LNG at its Sabine Pass facility with three trains and a capacity of about 2 billion cubic feet per day. Its total capacity is expected to be 3.5 billion cubic feet per day when all 5 trains are completed. Cheniere is in the process of getting contracts and financing for a sixth train.

By Institute for Energy Research - Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - Full Story

Agitators, regulators and predators on the prowl

Agitators, regulators and predators on the prowl
Legal and scientific ethics seem to have become irrelevant, as anti-chemical agitators, regulators and trial lawyers team up on numerous lawsuits against Monsanto. They’re seeking tens of billions of dollars in jackpot justice, by claiming a chemical in the company’s popular weed killer RoundUp causes cancer.

A key basis for the legal actions is a March 2015 International Agency for Research on Cancer ruling that glyphosate is a “probable human carcinogen.” A previously little known agency in the World Health Organization (WHO), IARC has gained infamy in recent years—as critics slammed it for manipulating data and altering or deleting scientific conclusions to advance extreme anti-chemical policy agendas.

By Paul Driessen - Sunday, October 29, 2017 - Full Story

Warmth is no Worry but Cold Kills

Napoleon in Russia
It was ice, not global warming, that killed and entombed millions of mammoths and woolly rhinos in Siberia and Alaska.

It was unrelenting cold and then ice, not global warming, that forced the Vikings out of Greenland.

It was bitter winters, not heat waves, that finally defeated the armies of Napoleon and Hitler in Russia. George Washington’s army also suffered from an unusually bitter winter at Valley Forge in 1778, in the depths of the Little Ice Age.

By Viv Forbes - Thursday, October 26, 2017 - Full Story

The 5 Countries That Could Push Oil Prices Up

Oil prices appear to be stuck in the $50s per barrel, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t serious supply risks to the market.

An unexpected disruption could occur at any moment, as has happened in the past, leading to a sudden and sharp jump in prices. Geopolitical tension has been largely irrelevant since the collapse of oil prices in 2014, but it’s making a return now that cracks have emerged in some key oil-producing nations. The threat of an outage will carry more weight as the oil market tightens.

By Oilprice.com -- Nick Cunningham- Wednesday, October 25, 2017 - Full Story

Vanadium: The Metal We Can’t Do Without And Don’t Produce

Vanadium: The Metal We Can’t Do Without And Don’t Produce
One of the world’s least known metals is also of great importance, and likely to become more so as renewable energies catch up with and possibly eclipse fossil fuels. Yet vanadium’s primary use as a steel alloy is set to keep prices buoyant and North American explorers racing to find a domestic source of the metal that was once used to make swords so strong and sharp the mere sight of them struck fear into the hearts of their enemies.

By Rick Mills - Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - Full Story

WHO Lied about Dangers of Roundup

WHO Lied about Dangers of Roundup

According to Reuters the Word Health Organization (WHO) purposefully distorted it’s findings on the weedkiller glyphosate , the key ingredient in Roundup.  Roundup has been the subject of multi-million dollar lawsuits as a result of the U.N. report claiming it is a carcinogen.

According to the article:

By Timothy Birdnow - Monday, October 23, 2017 - Full Story

Sea levels have been rising for 10,000 years

During the last ice age almost all of Canada, along with parts of Europe and Asia, were buried beneath one to two miles of ice. At the same time, sea levels stood 350 to 400 feet lower than today.

Sea levels were so low that the entire continental shelf, at least in eastern North America, was above water. Many states on the eastern seaboard were twice as big as today. New Jersey’s shoreline, for example, stood 60 to 100 miles east of its present location.


Trying to perpetuate alarmist climate “science”

Several months ago a brief furor erupted when the New York Times leaked the final draft of the upcoming Climate Science Special Report (CSSR), an extremely alarmist rendition of what is supposedly happening with Earth’s climate. Dangerous climate change and weather events, the report says, are due to mankind’s use of fossil fuels to create and maintain modern living standards and to the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases that result from that energy use.

The CSSR is being prepared by the federal Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and has been in the works for several years, mostly under Obama and still staffed by diehard alarmists.

By David Wojick, PhD - Friday, October 20, 2017 - Full Story

Lithium Supercycle

The truth, in regards to the world’s mineral resources, is that we in the western developed countries are usually not in control of supply.

“The spectre of resource insecurity has come back with a vengeance. The world is undergoing a period of intensified resource stress, driven in part by the scale and speed of demand growth from emerging economies and a decade of tight commodity markets. Poorly designed and short-sighted policies are also making things worse, not better. Whether or not resources are actually running out, the outlook is one of supply disruptions,  volatile prices, accelerated environmental degradation and rising political tensions over resource access.” Chatham House, Resources Futures

By Rick Mills - Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - Full Story

Clean Power Plan Repeal: Myths vs. Reality

With EPA administrator Scott Pruitt’s announcement that the Trump Administration was formally proposing repeal of the so-called “Clean Power Plan” (CPP), certain voices in the blogosphere and media predictably went nuts. In the formal response from IER, we have already applauded the announcement as promoting liberty in energy markets and keeping energy more affordable for American households. In the present post, let me further respond to some of the (hysterical) reactions that are based on myths.

By Institute for Energy Research - Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - Full Story