Health and Medicine

Health and Medicine, Cancer, Weight loss, Vitamins, Healthy Living, Surgery, Alternative Medicine, Health News

Saliva proteins could explain why some people overuse salt

Saliva proteins could explain why some people overuse salt
Many Americans consume too much salt. Now in a study appearing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that people who can easily taste salt have differing amounts of certain proteins in their saliva than those who are less sensitive. The finding could help explain why some of us have a hard time shaking the salt habit and could potentially lead to the development of more desirable low-sodium foods.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

Nicotine’s hold: What the gut and gender have to do with it

Nicotine's hold: What the gut and gender have to do with it, Nicotine affects the gut microbiome differently in male and female mice
Many people who smoke or chew tobacco can’t seem to escape nicotine’s addictive properties. Studies show that women in particular seem to have a harder time quitting, even with assistance, when compared to men. Now, scientists report in a mouse study published in ACS’ journal Chemical Research in Toxicology that the difference in gender smoking patterns and smoking’s effects could be due to how nicotine impacts the brain-gut relationship.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

An aspirin a day keeps many cancers away, study suggests

Long-term aspirin use reduces the risk of developing many cancers, a major study has shown.

Chinese researchers followed the progress of more than 600,000 people in the largest study to date looking at the link between cancer and aspirin.—More…

By News on the Net -- Telegraph- Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

It’s Time to Winterize Skin. It Doesn’t Tear Nylons!

 It’s Time to Winterize Skin
My editor, namely my wife of 62 years, recently said to me, “I’m getting tired of reading about Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular problems, cancer and other dreadful ailments. Why don’t you, for one week, give us a break from depressing disease? I’m sure readers would like to learn how to protect   skin during the coming winter season.”

One thing I’ve learned over the years is you never say no to an editor, particularly one who is your wife! So I interviewed experts about winterizing skin so it doesn’t look like dried prune. And are natural remedies available?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 30, 2017 - Full Story

10 Facts You Should Know About Coenzyme Q10

10 Facts You Should Know About Coenzyme Q10

Mark Twain once remarked, “Get your facts first, then distort them as you please!” Facts are easy to distort in medicine, particularly when talking about coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). So here are 10 vital things to know about this important enzyme. And what unintended consequences occur when humans start playing God.

One- What is CoQ10? It’s often referred to as the “sparkplug of our motors.” Cars run on gas. Our 37 trillion cells get their energy from ATP (adenosine triphosphate), but we cannot make ATP without CoQ10.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 23, 2017 - Full Story

A new class of drugs aims to exploit cancer cells’ weaknesses

In recent years, new cancer treatments have brought hope to people who once had limited options. But for others, the wait for an effective drug continues. Now on the horizon is a new generation of drugs based on a concept called synthetic lethality. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes stock of what’s in the pipeline.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - Full Story

How your eyelids move is a clue to diagnosing disease

What do your eyes say? An eyelid motion monitor (EMM) under advanced development at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa can diagnose certain diseases.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - Full Story

Opioid Abuse and the Prescription Monitoring Program

The Iowa Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) is designed to provide patient specific prescription data to individuals authorized by Iowa Code (IC) section 124.553(1)(a) and 657 Iowa Administrative Code (IAC) Chapter 37. A prescriber or pharmacist is authorized to request a Patient Rx History Report on an individual only if: (a.) The request is for the purpose of providing medical treatment or pharmaceutical services; and, (b.) The prescriber or pharmacist has a current practitioner-patient relationship or is initiating a practitioner-patient relationship with the individual named in the request.

By William Kevin Stoos - Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - Full Story

Breast cancer treatments today — and tomorrow (video)

WASHINGTON,  Breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Fortunately, the rate at which we’re learning about this disease means patients have a lot more treatment options and far better chances of survival than they did 100 years ago. In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Reactions describes what’s changed about how we treat breast cancer and what patients can expect in the future:

.

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, October 17, 2017 - Full Story

Women Are Not Just Men with Boobs and Tubes

George Carlin, the American comedian, once remarked when referring to God, “He, and if there is a God, I am convinced He is a He because no woman could or would screw things up this badly.” Karen Jensen, one of the world’s authorities on women’s health would agree. Her new book, “Women’s Health Matters”, reveals how male medical researchers and doctors screw up big time when it comes to women. They forget that women are not “just men with boobs and tubes.”

Her main point is that women are different. I say thank God for that, or as Maurice Chevalier remarked “Vive La Difference!” But what is forgotten is the fact that this difference has to be considered in both research and medical treatment.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 16, 2017 - Full Story

Israeli hospital gets grant to treat Syrian kids’ hearing loss

A six-figure donation from Israeli philanthropist Morris Kahn is going to Ziv Medical Center in Safed (Tzfat) to fund treatment of hearing loss among Syrian children brought from conflict areas to Israel for medical care.

The hospital near the border with Syria, recently visited by celebrity Conan O’Brien, has extensive experience treating wounded Syrian civilians.

By ISRAEL21c - Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - Full Story

Israeli company unveils revolutionary artificial cornea

An early-stage Israeli ophthalmic medical devices startup has developed a revolutionary artificial cornea implant that holds out hope to millions of blind and visually impaired people suffering from diseases of the cornea.

The nanotech-based solution by CorNeat Vision of Ra’anana is a synthetic cornea that uses advanced cell technology to integrate artificial optics within ocular tissue.

By ISRAEL21c - Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - Full Story

Israel: land of milk, honey and medical cannabis

In August, a joint feasibility committee of the Health and Finance ministries submitted a recommendation that Israel open its booming medical marijuana business to international exports. The market could be worth as much as $4 billion a year in revenue.

In the expectation that the proposal will be approved by legislators, an Israel company – Breath of Life Pharma (BOL) – is positioning itself to become the world’s largest medical cannabis facility.

By ISRAEL21c - Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - Full Story

I’ve Emerged from the Hearing Loss Closet!

Why is it that we accept the fact that everyone should see their dentist twice a year to detect dental decay? That we should get regular eye examinations and a checkup by our family doctor once a year? But ironically we rarely, if ever, hear that we should do the same for our ears! So why is this? And why am I not going to tell anyone that I can now finally hear?

By interviewing a number of experts my research revealed an interesting fact. Even in 2017 large numbers of North Americans continue to hide in the hearing loss closet. And I’m embarrassed to tell readers I’ve also been hiding in the same closet for years.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 9, 2017 - Full Story

Ten Vital Facts to Know About “Baby Aspirin”

One – You’re in your 50s. The Medical Publication, Health After 50, reports that a panel of experts has updated the guidelines for taking Aspirin at various ages. It says you, in your 50s, have a 10 percent or greater risk of coronary attack or stroke in the next 10 years, and a life expectancy of at least 10 years with no increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. If you meet one of these requirements it says you may be a candidate for a daily baby Aspirin (81 milligrams). You can calculate your risk of heart attack at http://www.cvriskcalculator.

Two – You’re in your 60s. In this case, the publication says you have a high risk of heart attack or stroke over the next 10 years and a life expectancy of at least 10 years with no increased risk of GI bleeding. If you meet one of the these requirements you must then be prepared to take a daily 81 mg. Aspirin for 10 years which is the minimum required for benefits to take effect.

Three - You’re 70 years of age or older, or younger than 50.  Here, experts say there’s not enough evidence to advise one way or the other in preventing either a first heart attack or colon cancer. But it adds that, since many over the age of 70 have health problems, the risk of heart attack or stroke may be increased. Then the benefits of a daily Aspirin may be substantial.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 2, 2017 - Full Story

Ancient ink for cancer treatment

For hundreds of years, Chinese calligraphers have used a plant-based ink to create beautiful messages and art. Now, one group reports in ACS Omega that this ink could noninvasively and effectively treat cancer cells that spread, or metastasize, to lymph nodes.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 28, 2017 - Full Story

Unlocking the mysteries of memory — and potentially enhancing it

Memory acts like an anchor, reminding us of past experiences that have made us who we are today. Attempts to boost it, particularly as we age, have sprouted cottage industries of supplements and brain games. In parallel, researchers have been pursuing pharmaceutical interventions. In some of the latest work on this front, one team reports in ACS Chemical Neuroscience that they have identified a novel compound that enhances long-term memory in animal studies.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 28, 2017 - Full Story

Hidden bacteria can hinder chemotherapy, study finds

Bacteria hidden inside cancer cells may hinder the effectiveness of chemotherapy. The surprising finding was published last week in Science magazine based on research led by molecular cell biologist Ravid Straussman of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - Full Story

Ensuring broccoli sprouts retain their cancer-fighting compounds

Raw broccoli sprouts, a rich source of potential cancer-fighting compounds, have become a popular health food in recent years. But conventional heat treatment used to kill bacteria on produce can reduce levels of the broccoli sprouts’ helpful phytochemicals. Now researchers report in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that high-pressure processing could wipe out harmful bacteria while maintaining high concentrations of its health-promoting ingredients.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 25, 2017 - Full Story

Smokers who quit have metabolite levels that resemble those of nonsmokers

Even after years of smoking, the body has a remarkable ability to repair itself. Now in a study appearing in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research, scientists report that certain metabolic changes occur soon after quitting, and these changes could help explain how some ill-effects of smoking might be reversible.

Smoking kills more than 7 million people worldwide annually and is one of the most important risk factors for six of world’s eight leading causes of premature death, according to the World Health Organization. But soon after a person quits, the body begins to repair some of accumulated damage caused by smoking. In fact, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, within two to three months of quitting, lung function begins to improve and the risk of heart attack begins to diminish. A previous study published in 2013 suggested that metabolic changes that occur after smoking cessation may kick start these physiological improvements. Building on this work, Nikola Pluym and colleagues sought to hone in on what alterations smoking causes in the body’s metabolic pathways and whether any of these changes are reversible after quitting.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 25, 2017 - Full Story