Science-Technology

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Males Now Unnecessary; Women Create Their Own Sperm

British scientists at the Newcastle University have announced that they are ready to turn female bone marrow into sperm. This type of research has been a high priority, using cells that theoretically can turn into any other type of cell. Naturally, a chorus of concerns and arguments has been raised almost immediately.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Sunday, February 3, 2008 - Full Story

Affordable Color Laser for the Home/Office? Oh, Brother!

A general trend with things technological is that prices and sizes drop and capabilities increase. So it is with color laser printers, which have gone from stratospheric hulks accessible only to large corporations, to much more manageable sizes and prices that nearly any home office can handle.

By Jim Bray - Friday, February 1, 2008 - Full Story

Weather Control to provide Rain Free Olympics

Not satisfied with providing us with a horde of smiling hostesses and an Opening Ceremony that is being billed as spectacular, the Chinese are looking to weather control to ensure a rain-free ceremony.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 31, 2008 - Full Story

Contact Lenses Brings out the Terminator in Anyone

The world just keeps getting further and further in to the advanced technical age we were promised (ok, not me, but my parents) when we (they) were kids. This time, it’s the futuristic idea of being able to see images or data on your glasses, or in this case, in your contact lenses.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - Full Story

Have You Been Photonapped?

In a day and age where the internet has provided ease of access to everything, the big topic on everyone’s lips is that of ownership. Who owns what you write, what you take a photo of, what you listen too, what you watch?

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - Full Story

String Theory slightly preferred… or at least, not disfavored!

To listen to people speak about string theory is a lesson in ambiguity. No one is willing to commit to a solid opinion, on either side of the coin, and they dance upon the fence as if they were auditioning for a Garfield strip.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - Full Story

Steve Jobs versus the Book

Sometimes a story/article must be built upon very little. In church, it is often the case with a good pastor that you will get a whole sermon on one short sentence. Here is my chance to test my skills against the fanboy-god Steve Jobs, in much the same vain.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - Full Story

Dinosaurs Big Goodbye Wetter than Previously Thought

When people think of the dinosaurs their minds will predominantly conjure up two thoughts; one regarding their lives – a fairly basic, and popular, Jurassic Park view – and one on the end of their lives. Many people are fascinated by just what it was that did in the dinosaurs. And though now the Alvarez hypothesis – the position that a large asteroid impacted the Yucatan Peninsula sixty-five million years ago – holds sway as lead theory, there is more to it than just “big asteroid go kablooie!”

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 30, 2008 - Full Story

Home Entertainment Becomes a “Servers” Industry

Prepare for your electronics to be assimilated.

By Jim Bray - Tuesday, January 29, 2008 - Full Story

Steven Pinker’s Utopian Dream

In today’s progressive milieu, the evolutionary psychologist is the anointed high priest to the morally disoriented masses. This new breed seeks to “dissect our moral intuitions”, while he hides behind the seemingly unbiased pretext that he is called to merely examine phenomena, not extract moral principles from it.

By News on the Net - Friday, January 25, 2008 - Full Story

Race to the Moon or Race to Mars

The Bush Government has of late been redirecting NASA’s efforts towards heading back to the Moon. But to many people, the term ‘heading back’ is exactly the problem. We’ve been there, and while everyone wants to get to Mars, the Moon is not the place to visit on the way.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, January 22, 2008 - Full Story

Mass Extinctions Not So Easy to Come Back From

A recent report from the University of Bristol, and published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B this week, focuses on just what it takes for real recovery to take place after a mass extinction. The study, conducted by Sarda Sahney and Professor Michael Benton focused upon the mass extinction at the end of the Permian era, known as the end-Permian mass extinction.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Monday, January 21, 2008 - Full Story

Deep-Ocean Researchers Target Tsunami Zone near Japan

We will all remember the 2004 Boxing Day Tsunami that originated in the Indian Ocean, just off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. Tsunamis such as these originate from undersea earthquakes, which essentially push tons of water skyward, and thus creating the tsunami waves.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Monday, January 21, 2008 - Full Story

My-iButton; New Tech ID – Or Advertising OD?

The old fashioned name tag may soon be obsolete as technology leaps to your lapels. Or maybe it’s more a marketing leap than a technological one.

By Jim Bray - Sunday, January 20, 2008 - Full Story

Rotel Player Reincarnates Old DVD’s

With Blu-ray looking as if it’s going to win the high definition disc format war, the road toward the future of disc-based playback appears to be clearing. It’s about time.

By Jim Bray - Sunday, January 20, 2008 - Full Story

New yet Extinct King of the Jungle

My home of Australia holds the record number of venomous spiders and snakes in the world, and if it weren’t for its extinction, we may also have had ‘King of the Jungle’ to add to our list of fauna titles.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Saturday, January 19, 2008 - Full Story

Underwater Volcano Discovered in Pacific

One of those fantastic trivia questions that I love to tote around with me is asking people what is the tallest peak on the planet Earth. It is theoretically a simple question, isn’t it; the answer is Mt. Everest.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Saturday, January 19, 2008 - Full Story

Brilliant’s Brilliant Plan for Humanitarian Aid

I am a huge supporter of the Web2.0 project Twitter; it is fun, it is simple, and most of all it has implications ranging far wider than simple ego-blogging.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Saturday, January 19, 2008 - Full Story

Fingers pointing at old Crown Jewel thief

I have a soft spot in my heart for thieves, at least those that lead a Robin Hood type existence. So when historian Sean J. Murphy pointed the finger at Francis Shackleton, the brother of polar explorer Ernest, in the Irish Crown Jewels theft, I was a little bit happy.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Saturday, January 19, 2008 - Full Story

Yellowstone at risk of Hydrothermal explosion, not Volcanic

One of the USA’s greatest tourist destinations, Yellowstone National Park is more than just the home of Old Faithful. Yellowstone lies atop one of the world’s few dozen hotspots, just like Hawaii, and is home to the Yellowstone Caldera (a volcanic feature formed by the collapse of land following a volcanic eruption) which measures in at 55 kilometers by 72 kilometers.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 16, 2008 - Full Story