Science-Technology

Science, Archaeology, Geology, Paleontology, Astronomy, Space, Technology, new products

The Dust that Formed us Has a Home

Dust is all the rage at the moment, thanks to Phillip Pullman’s widely popular His Dark Materials trilogy. But what of the dust that formed what we know and love today; the dust that, for all intents and purposes, we are all made from.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 3, 2008 - Full Story

Ancient Civilization Found

Reported at the end of last year, but missed pretty much everywhere, Russian archaeologists working in Kyrgyzstan have discovered the remains of, what must have been at its time, a thriving metropolis. Estimated to be from 2,500 years ago, they were found at the bottom of Lake Issyk Kul, in the Kyrgyz mountains.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 3, 2008 - Full Story

Is Modern Man Descendant of Neanderthal?

It is always a joy to write a piece on scientific ‘evidence’ that pits itself against long held beliefs. Thus it is my great pleasure to visit the world of human evolution; where we came from, and whether we lived side by side the Neanderthal, or evolved from him.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 3, 2008 - Full Story

Feasible Impact Risk Detected

It seems a bit of a wonder that movies like Deep Impact and Armageddon made such an impact on humanity, considering the source of their storyline. One would imagine that the end of all humankind is not necessarily a story built for the masses.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 2, 2008 - Full Story

Twin Satellites to make Study of the Moon

It has played a significant part in our planets history, both geographical and historical. But our moon has been ultimately unexplored, except for a few locations where humanity has left their footprints. So an MIT study costing $375 million will attempt to rectify that matter, by conducted a study using a pair of satellites.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, December 20, 2007 - Full Story

Google to go up against Wikipedia

If you had asked me prior to this news who there was in the world that could successfully beat Wikipedia at their own game, there would have been only one answer. With their stated mission to gather all of the world’s information, Google not only have what it takes to beat Wikipedia, but the fan base as well.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, December 20, 2007 - Full Story

Does Time Slow Down in an Emergency?

“Does the experience of slow motion really happen, or does it only seem to have happened in retrospect? The answer is critical for understanding how time is represented in the brain.” That is the question being asked by several American scientists who, for science, decided that jumping off a 45-meter high platform would be a good method of discovery.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Monday, December 17, 2007 - Full Story

Replacing the Shuttle NASA’s big Dilemma

Most of you will be well aware by now that NASA’s fleet of space shuttle’s will be retired 2010. After nearly 30 years of (semi-)regular trips to space, NASA is mothballing the Atlantis, Discovery and Endeavor space shuttles.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Friday, December 14, 2007 - Full Story

Captain Kidd’s Last Prize Found

The other day I reflected on a child’s love of dinosaurs, and how they play such a fun part in our adolescence. Add a few more years to our imaginary child there, with his dinosaur toys under his bed and his books gathering dust in the bookshelves, and he’s moved on to more exciting discoveries: pirates!

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Friday, December 14, 2007 - Full Story

Dinosaurs Called Antarctica Home?

As children, one of those topics that fascinate the most is that of dinosaurs. Whether you played with toys, had pictures, or read the books, dinosaurs are almost an integral part of every child’s life. So it isn’t with any reluctance that we get to revisit such stories when we’ve moved on in to our adult lives. The same can be said for the team led by William Hammer of Augustana College, who found the remains of a dinosaur in Antarctica in the early 1990s.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, December 13, 2007 - Full Story

No Federation or Empire for Our Universe

Whether you’re a Sci-Fi fan or not, you will have probably watched at least an episode of Star Trek, or one of the Star Wars movies. The former’s Federation of Planets is the utopia of many, including myself, and the latter’s Galactic Empire definitely doesn’t do anything for one’s self esteem in a universe. Across the realm of science fiction mediums, great galactic groups of people come together to wage war or preserve peace.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, December 11, 2007 - Full Story

Sols Solar System Squashed

December 2004 saw the Voyager 1 spacecraft exit our solar system. It was the first manmade object to do so, and has been an unqualified success from its launch date, September 5, 1977. Its sister ship, Voyager 2 has also made it outside the solar system, and in doing so, provided us with invaluable information about our home.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, December 11, 2007 - Full Story

Pen Computer Aims at Literate Kids

Everyone knows kids are far more tech savvy than we oldsters and that they’re as at home with computers as they are with mouthing off to grownups and hanging out at malls. This “savviness” seems especially true with computers, to which kids take like the proverbial duck to water.

By Jim Bray - Monday, December 10, 2007 - Full Story

Software Lets You Record Your Favorite Online Programs

Broadcasters are going online increasingly, which can make it difficult to record a particular show you’d like to monitor or time shift. VCR’s and PVR’s will do a fine job of “taping” a show from off air, cable or satellite TV, but they’re useless if what you want to record is being streamed over the Internet.

By Jim Bray - Monday, December 10, 2007 - Full Story

The Ugly Duckling of the US Space Program

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, December 4, 2007 - Full Story

The Precipice of a New Technological Age

Technological advancement is one of those things that people only notice long after. There are dozens of little things that have to come prior to mass distribution. A new phone is reliant on so much, but people only see flashy phones that they think are the ‘next thing.’

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, December 4, 2007 - Full Story

From a Water Fight to a Fire Fight

For many of us, when the days got hot, and we were still sent to school, it meant only one thing; a water fight! Magically, water balloons would be pulled from pockets at lunch time, and mayhem would ensue. Given a hot enough day, the teachers would also wondrously fail to notice the soaking children coming in after lunch was over. Who ever thought that such mad fun could possibly lead to a way to fight fires?

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Monday, December 3, 2007 - Full Story

A 2007 Technology Review: The Bad!

The latest year on the calendar is coming to a close, and we at Daily Galaxy thought it was time to take a bit of a look back at the year. Being the resident nerd, I’ve decided to begin by tackling the bad in the tech world we’ve had to endure this year.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Monday, December 3, 2007 - Full Story

The Great Nothing may be something…

Earlier this year astronomers from the University of Minnesota discovered a massive void of space that measured nearly a billion light years across. It was a real discovery, in a universe that is filled with numerous objects, cramming up the space.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Monday, December 3, 2007 - Full Story

Inflatable Space Base Heads to South Pole

We’ve seen over the past decade the slow reemergence back in to the world of lunar exploration. After the excitement of the Apollo missions died away and funding with it, it’s good to see us moving back to the moon. NASA is planning missions by 2020, and China is hoping to head there soon after.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, November 20, 2007 - Full Story