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Old Health and Medicine Articles from 2007 and Before

Preventing psoriasis with vanillin

Preventing psoriasis with vanillin
Small amounts of artificial vanilla extract, also known as vanillin, are in a wide range of products, from baked goods to perfumes. But vanillin’s versatility doesn’t stop there. In a recent mouse study reported in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers report that this compound could also prevent or reduce psoriatic skin inflammation.

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, December 12, 2017 - Full Story

Our Belly proves we’re not Gods this Holiday Season

Our Belly proves we’re not Gods this Holiday Season
This is the season to be jolly, and the last thing I want to do is spoil the holiday festivities. But, unfortunately, the office parties, family dinners, excess wine and fellowship of singing “Auld Lang Syne, all take a toll on one’s stomach. So, can you lessen the damage of hot fire beneath the breastbone? And what are the pitfalls in the treatment of this common discomfort?

Heartburn is triggered by several factors. The lower esophageal muscle   (LEM) at the end of the food pipe can become weak and inefficient at times.  So if you “eat the whole thing”, excess gas is created in the stomach and the laws of physics say something has to give. This results in the LEM opening, and gas, along with the stomach’s acidic juice, flows into the esophagus causing inflammation.

The Gifford-Jones Law states “one bad problem leads to another and another.” So if this scenario is repeated over and over, chronic inflammation can end in a condition called Barrett’s Esophagus. This can turn into esophageal cancer in one of every 200 cases. A big price to pay for gluttony.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, December 11, 2017 - Full Story

How Xanax works (video)

WASHINGTON — Whether or not you have anxiety, you’ve probably heard of Xanax. But what’s in this popular and widely prescribed drug, and how does it work? This new video from Reactions describes how Xanax works in the anxious brain:

 

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - Full Story

Heroin for Opioid Addicts, None for Cancer Patients

Heroin for Opioid Addicts, None for Cancer Patients
Where is the common sense and compassion in this country for cancer patients who suffer in agony? I write this because drug addicts, who largely seek pleasure from opioid drugs, are now getting better pain control than cancer victims. And these patients and their families should be enraged by what is happening.

The Federal Minister of Health (MOH), Ginette P. Taylor, has announced a 100 million dollar fund to fight the opioid crisis. She reports “This situation keeps me up at night.” I should remind her that cancer pain keeps many patients in agony   24 hours a day!

What is more galling is that the government wants to reduce barriers that limit access to heroin for addicts in drug-treatment programs. Yet there is no such access for cancer patients in hospitals. It appears that not all the lunatics are in the asylum.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - Full Story

Taking Arsenic Would be the Safer Option

Taking Arsenic Would be the Safer Option
Today, there’s almost a crusade taking place to decrease the risk of concussion in hockey, football and other sports. But what is the risk of other injuries? A study, published in the issue of JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery, says you do not have to participate in high octane sports to be injured. The report shows that facial fractures among older adults are on the rise. And taking arsenic in some activities would seem to be a safer option for some seniors.

Researchers, at Wayne State University in Detroit, evaluated national emergency room statistics and discovered an interesting trend. During a five year period 20,500 adults ages 55 and older suffered facial fractures. In fact, the number of these injuries had increased 45 percent over the preceding five years.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, November 27, 2017 - Full Story

After cooking, biofortified corn and eggs retain vital nutrient needed to prevent blindness

Corn muffins and other foods made with biofortified maize and eggs retain vitamin A after being cooked
Fortified and biofortified foods are at the forefront of efforts to combat vitamin A deficiency worldwide. But little is known about what influence processing may have on the retention of vitamin A precursors in these foods. Now in a study appearing in ACS Omega, scientists report that a high percentage of these healthful substances — in some cases, almost all — can survive cooking, depending on the preparation method.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - Full Story

Strategies to combat the opioid epidemic

Strategies to combat the opioid epidemic
The opioid epidemic is ravaging lives and tearing families apart. Overdose deaths from heroin, fentanyl and misused prescription painkillers have tripled in the past 15 years. Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores how abuse-deterring and novel formulations for painkillers in addition to crime-fighting tools to quickly identify opioids could help curb the crisis.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 22, 2017 - Full Story

A Recipe for Alzheimer’s Disease

A Recipe for Alzheimer’s Disease
What causes Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)? I recently read an article written by Stephanie Seneff, a Senior Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. I know from my years at Harvard that MIT does not employ dummies. So it’s worthwhile reading her “Recipe for Developing AD.”

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, November 20, 2017 - Full Story

The Right Man for Healing and a Rare Find

The Right Man for Healing and a Rare Find
I was not sure my ENT specialist was a good fit for me even though I read the glowing praises framed on his office walls, praises coming from his patients, colleagues, and other doctors. The young man seemed to know what he was doing but his bedside manner was brief and rather cold.
I attributed his demeanor to his introverted personality, his professionalism, and to his respect for his patients’ time. Very punctual, he very seldom made anybody wait to see him, he was always on time.

One day I realized that he was much more caring on the inside than he let people see. A young woman with her mom and a three-year old in tow had an appointment to see the doctor. The receptionist, Lupe, asked her if she was prepared to pay for that day’s visit. The young woman had a grief-stricken look on her face and wondered how much the visit was going to be. The receptionist told her that she did not know because each patient was different, depending on the problem. The young woman replied in a sad and disappointed voice that she will reschedule until such a time that she would have enough cash on hand to pay for the visit.

By Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh - Thursday, November 16, 2017 - Full Story

The only detox you’ll ever need (video)

WASHINGTON—People talk all the time about how they need to “detox.” And there’s a line of companies a mile long waiting to sell you juices and smoothies that claim to cleanse your body of harmful toxins. But the good news is your body is working hard to clear out toxins before you spend a dime on expensive products. Toxicology expert Raychelle Burks explains how in this kale-free episode of Reactions:

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - Full Story