American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

Nanotechnology could redefine oral surgery

Feb 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Nanotechnology could redefine oral surgery
A trip to the dentist or orthodontist usually instills a sense of dread in most patients, and that’s before the exam even begins. Add to that the fear of oral surgery with a painful recovery, and many people will avoid these visits at all costs. Now, one group reports a pre-clinical study in ACS Nano showing that they could potentially reduce pain and recovery time with the aid of specialized nanotechnology.


Thermal blankets melt snow quickly

Feb 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Thermal blankets melt snow quickly
Removing snow piled high in parking lots and along roadsides could soon be a far less tedious task. In a study appearing in ACS’ journal Langmuir, scientists report that they have tested sunlight-absorbing thermal blankets capable of melting snow three times faster than it would on its own. They say the blankets could slash snow-removal costs and reduce the risk of environmental contamination caused by soot and other products used to melt the white stuff.


A step toward sensitive and fast gluten detection

Feb 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

A step toward sensitive and fast gluten detection
For people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities, the number of food options in the stores is growing. But current tests for gluten are not finding all of the substance in foods, resulting in some products being labeled “gluten free” when they really aren’t. Now researchers reporting in ACS Sensors say they have developed a fast gluten detector that has the potential to detect and quantify different sources of gluten than those on the market today.


Coffee threatened by climate change, disease, pests

Feb 14, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Coffee threatened by climate change, disease, pests
According to connoisseurs, the tastiest of coffee beans come from the Coffea arabica shrub, a fragile weakling that is susceptible to diseases and pests. And climate change isn’t making things any easier for the plant. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, reports that although coffee producers and scientists agree that C. arabica is under siege, they don’t agree on what to do about it.


Chemtrails vs. contrails (video)

Feb 6, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, Feb. 6, 2018 — It’s easy to look at the white trail behind a jet aircraft and imagine all manner of chemicals raining down from above. However, airplane contrails are simply what happens when jet engines burn fuel. In this video, Reactions explains the straightforward chemistry of contrails: https://youtu.be/ZonPvpgcBc0.




Biomarker tests could someday help improve outcomes for organ transplant patients

Feb 5, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Biomarker tests could someday help improve outcomes for organ transplant patients
Organ transplants save lives, but the story doesn’t end when a patient emerges from the operating room. Rejection episodes, in which the immune system rallies against the new organ, can occur. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are turning to biomarkers to help them get a better idea of which patients are more likely to have an episode.


Getting ready for the summer sun with ‘green’ sunscreens

Feb 5, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Getting ready for the summer sun with 'green' sunscreens
Although it’s been a tough winter for many people in the U.S., summer is coming. And that means backyard barbeques, fun on the beach and, of course, slathering on sunscreen. But one particular environmentally friendly sunscreen ingredient has been difficult to obtain — that ingredient, shinorine, could only be harvested from nature. Scientists now report in ACS Synthetic Biology the laboratory production of that compound.


Skin-inspired coating that’s as hard as teeth and can heal itself

Feb 5, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Skin-inspired coating that's as hard as teeth and can heal itself
Self-healing smart coatings could someday make scratches on cell phones a thing of the past. But researchers often have to compromise between strength and the ability to self-repair when developing these materials. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano the development of a smart coating that is as hard as tooth enamel on the outside but can heal itself like skin can.


The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage

Feb 5, 2018 — American Chemical Society

The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage
From popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. But little is known about the chemistry behind the bubbles. Now, one group sheds some light on how carbonation can affect the creaminess and smoothness of beverages, as reported in ACS’ The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.


Gallium and the history of the periodic table (video)

Jan 30, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Some chemists might see the periodic table of elements as a holy testament to the power of science. However, when it first debuted, it was a different kind of holey, and its journey to classroom walls everywhere had a whole lot of bumps. Watch as Reactions digs into the history of the periodic table with the help of a vanishing spoon, a man named after a rooster, and a bearded Russian




Lab-grown horns and tusks could stop poaching — or not

Jan 25, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Lab-grown horns and tusks could stop poaching — or not
Scientists are making mimics of rhino horns and elephant tusks, hoping to drive down the prices of these items on the black market and discourage poaching. But many conservation groups argue that it could have the opposite effect, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


New biosensor could monitor glucose levels in tears and sweat

Jan 25, 2018 — American Chemical Society

New biosensor could monitor glucose levels in tears and sweat
Constantly tracking a person’s glucose levels through their tears or sweat could be one step closer to providing people with diabetes an improved monitoring tool. Researchers report in the journal ACS Nano the development of an ultra-thin, flexible sensor that could be incorporated into contact lenses or on the backs of watches for real-time glucose tracking.


Pearly material for bendable heating elements (video)

Jan 25, 2018 — American Chemical Society

The iridescent shimmer of a string of pearls may one day be more than pretty adornment. Scientists now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a hybrid material consisting of imitation pearl combined with silver nanowires that works as a heater, with the added benefit of high flexibility, suggesting a potential role in wearable devices.


Artificial sweetener could someday provide cancer treatments with fewer side effects

Jan 25, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Artificial sweeteners
Artificial sweeteners are used in diet drinks and foods but also could someday be used as treatments targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), a protein associated with aggressive cancers. Although several drugs have been approved that target similar forms of CA, they aren’t selective and may cause side effects, including vomiting and fatigue. Now researchers report in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry that an artificial sweetener could lead to development of a more selective therapy.


Do low-carb diets really do anything? (video)

Jan 23, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Some fads never die. Low-carb diets were a thing in the late 90s and they’re still a thing now. But why does this fad have staying power? Is it because the touted benefits are real? Or is that greasy, low-carb burger fried in snake oil? Learn about the surprising medical benefits of ketogenic diets in this video from Reactions:

 


Gorilla Glass debuts in car windshields

Jan 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Gorilla Glass debuts in car windshields
Chemically toughened glass already keeps cell phone screens (mostly) crack-free, and now this type of glass is starting to make its mark in the auto industry in car windshields. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, Gorilla Glass and similar strong, transparent materials could soon make an appearance in even more consumer products.


Brain protein changes could explain how concussions affect patients

Jan 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Brain protein changes could explain how concussions affect patients
Traumatic brain injuries, whether suffered from a blow on the football field or the battle field, can be devastating, leading to disability and shortened lives. However, little is known about how different levels of injury and time affect the brain, hindering efforts to develop effective treatments. Scientists now report results from rodent studies in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research showing that signaling molecules are likely involved in mild cases, also known as concussions.


A step toward ridding register receipts of BPA

Jan 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society


Although the U.S and other countries have banned or restricted the use of bisphenol A (BPA) because of environmental and health concerns, it is still used in thermally printed receipts and labels. Now researchers report in a study in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research that they have developed potentially safer polymers that could replace BPA for printed papers.


Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poison

Jan 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poison
Women have many options for oral contraceptives that are safe, effective and reversible, but despite decades of research, men have none. Now, scientists report a rat study in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry that shows they finally have a good lead for a male birth control pill. It’s based on ouabain, a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poison on their arrows.


Bridging tumor moats with potent drug delivery particles

Jan 17, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Bridging tumor moats with potent drug delivery particles
Despite herculean efforts, cancer remains a formidable disease, with each malignant subtype responding differently to therapeutics. One hurdle specific to treating solid tumors is a protective layer called an extracellular matrix that can prevent chemotherapeutic agents from penetrating the tumor’s core. Scientists now report results in ACS’ Chemistry of Materials showing that, by cloaking anti-cancer drugs in a specially designed particle, they could target and destroy tumor cells deep inside a malignant mass in vitro.