American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

The only detox you’ll ever need (video)

Nov 14, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—People talk all the time about how they need to “detox.” And there’s a line of companies a mile long waiting to sell you juices and smoothies that claim to cleanse your body of harmful toxins. But the good news is your body is working hard to clear out toxins before you spend a dime on expensive products. Toxicology expert Raychelle Burks explains how in this kale-free episode of Reactions:


New needle-free vaccines could mean the end of the flu shot

Nov 10, 2017 — American Chemical Society

New needle-free vaccines could mean the end of the flu shot
Autumn has arrived, leaves are changing colors, and pumpkin spice aromas are sweeping stores. It’s also the season for flu shots. The good news is that the annual jab in the arm designed to protect us from the flu might one day be a thing of the past. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, describes advances in injection-free vaccination methods that are showing promise.


New “sugar-glass” film uses viruses to kill harmful bacteria in food

Nov 10, 2017 — American Chemical Society

New sugar-glass film uses viruses to kill harmful bacteria in food
With antibiotic resistance on the rise, bacterial contamination of food is becoming more problematic. Now in a study appearing in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, scientists report that they have developed an antibacterial “sugar-glass” coating in which viruses that destroy bacteria are embedded and are kept stable for up to three months. The coating could someday be used in the food packaging and processing industries to help prevent food-borne illnesses and deaths.


Cool textiles to beat the heat

Nov 10, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Cool textiles to beat the heat
Air-conditioned buildings bring welcome relief to people coming in from the heat. But creating that comfort comes with a cost to our wallets and the environment in the form of increased energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions. Now researchers report in ACS Nano the development of a new material for clothing that we could one day don as our own personal cooling unit, without any external energy needed to power it.


Cleaning up aquatic pollution with mussels

Nov 8, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Cleaning up aquatic pollution with mussels
Scientists and activists alike have been looking for a solution to the problem of aquatic nutrient pollution. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that ribbed mussels are up to the clean-up challenge.

When it comes to nutrients, like nitrogen and phosphorus, too much of a good thing can be bad. These nutrients end up in rivers and streams as the result of human activities and can cause algal blooms, loss of seagrass and low oxygen levels, which can lead to large numbers of fish and other organisms dying.


Saliva proteins could explain why some people overuse salt

Nov 2, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Saliva proteins could explain why some people overuse salt
Many Americans consume too much salt. Now in a study appearing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that people who can easily taste salt have differing amounts of certain proteins in their saliva than those who are less sensitive. The finding could help explain why some of us have a hard time shaking the salt habit and could potentially lead to the development of more desirable low-sodium foods.


Nicotine’s hold: What the gut and gender have to do with it

Nov 2, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Nicotine's hold: What the gut and gender have to do with it, Nicotine affects the gut microbiome differently in male and female mice
Many people who smoke or chew tobacco can’t seem to escape nicotine’s addictive properties. Studies show that women in particular seem to have a harder time quitting, even with assistance, when compared to men. Now, scientists report in a mouse study published in ACS’ journal Chemical Research in Toxicology that the difference in gender smoking patterns and smoking’s effects could be due to how nicotine impacts the brain-gut relationship.


Jellyfish-inspired electronic skin glows when it gets hurt

Nov 2, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Jellyfish-inspired electronic skin glows when it gets hurt
Electronic-skin technologies for prosthetics and robots can detect the slightest touch or breeze. But oddly, the sensors that make this possible do not respond effectively to a harmful blow. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a jellyfish-inspired electronic skin that glows when the pressure against it is high enough to potentially cause an injury.


The chemistry of Hollywood bloodbaths (video)

Oct 30, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Fake blood is a staple of the Halloween horror film experience, but there’s no one recipe to suit every filmmaker’s needs. The chemistry of fake blood has always been tweaked to create the most realistic experience, or at least the most budget-friendly. From Alfred Hitchcock to Sam Raimi, join Reactions on a Halloween tour of the chemistry of gore:

For more Halloween chemistry, listen to our latest Science Elements podcast to hear a spooky Dickensian tale about spontaneous combustion, written by Sam Kean, author of The Disappearing Spoon: .


A new class of drugs aims to exploit cancer cells’ weaknesses

Oct 18, 2017 — American Chemical Society

In recent years, new cancer treatments have brought hope to people who once had limited options. But for others, the wait for an effective drug continues. Now on the horizon is a new generation of drugs based on a concept called synthetic lethality. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes stock of what’s in the pipeline.


The making of medieval bling

Oct 18, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Gold has long been valued for its luxurious glitter and hue, and threads of the gleaming metal have graced clothing and tapestries for centuries. Determining how artisans accomplished these adornments in the distant past can help scientists restore, preserve and date artifacts, but solutions to these puzzles have been elusive. Now scientists, reporting in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, have revealed that medieval artisans used a gilding technology that has endured for centuries.


Key odorants in world’s most expensive beef could help explain its allure

Oct 18, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Renowned for its soft texture and characteristic flavor, Wagyu beef — often referred to as Kobe beef in the U.S. — has become one of the world’s most sought-after meats. Now in a study appearing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that they have detected several key odorants that contribute to the delicacy’s alluring aroma.


On the road to fire-free, lithium-ion batteries made with asphalt

Oct 18, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Lithium-ion batteries can be found in everything from cell phones to hoverboards, but these power sources have recently made headlines for the fires they have inadvertently caused. To address these safety hazards, scientists report in ACS Nano that they are paving the way to better batteries with a naturally occurring form of asphalt.


Breast cancer treatments today — and tomorrow (video)

Oct 17, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON,  Breast cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Fortunately, the rate at which we’re learning about this disease means patients have a lot more treatment options and far better chances of survival than they did 100 years ago. In observance of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Reactions describes what’s changed about how we treat breast cancer and what patients can expect in the future:

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“Cook” an Egg with No Heat— — and other weird egg science

Oct 10, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10, 2017 — You can learn a lot from eggs. The versatile, delicious, humble chicken egg. You can unlock the secrets of the universe with eggs, or at least a couple of them through these fun (if slightly weird) DIY chemistry experiments in our latest episode of Reactions. Find out how you can “cook” an egg without heat, make them bounce like a basketball and whip up a batch of green eggs for the Dr. Seuss fans in your life: https://youtu.be/1aMzpbqSw9o.


The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Cryo-electron microscopy explained (video)

Oct 5, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON— Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have claimed this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The trio earned the prize for their work on cryo-electron microscopy, which is an imaging technique that lets researchers see proteins and other large biomolecules with atomic precision. Learn more about this discovery and its impact in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:

 


Fuel-cell cars cruise onto the market

Sep 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Fuel-cell powered cars that emit only water vapor when driven have been in the works for decades, but progress seemed to keep stalling. Now, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the wait is over. Motorists can finally lease or buy hydrogen-powered, fuel-cell cars, but the road ahead for these vehicles still faces some bumps.


Ancient ink for cancer treatment

Sep 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

For hundreds of years, Chinese calligraphers have used a plant-based ink to create beautiful messages and art. Now, one group reports in ACS Omega that this ink could noninvasively and effectively treat cancer cells that spread, or metastasize, to lymph nodes.


Olive mill wastewater transformed: From pollutant to bio-fertilizer, biofuel

Sep 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Olive oil has long been a popular kitchen staple. Yet producing the oil creates a vast stream of wastewater that can foul waterways, reduce soil fertility and trigger extensive damage to nearby ecosystems. Now in a study appearing in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, scientists report on the development of an environmentally friendly process that could transform this pollutant into “green” biofuel, bio-fertilizer and safe water for use in agricultural irrigation.


Unlocking the mysteries of memory — and potentially enhancing it

Sep 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Memory acts like an anchor, reminding us of past experiences that have made us who we are today. Attempts to boost it, particularly as we age, have sprouted cottage industries of supplements and brain games. In parallel, researchers have been pursuing pharmaceutical interventions. In some of the latest work on this front, one team reports in ACS Chemical Neuroscience that they have identified a novel compound that enhances long-term memory in animal studies.