American Chemical Society


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American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

Sushi’s sublime secrets (video)

Sep 20, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Sushi is sublime. Just fresh fish and seasoned rice in its simplest form served one on top of the other, or rolled up with some veggies in a seaweed wrapper. What creates the subtle interplay of flavors in your tuna nigiri? Take a deep dive into the chemistry of rice, fish and seaweed in this video from Reactions

 


Toward unbreakable encrypted messages

Sep 15, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Chinese researchers recently announced a landmark advancement: They used a satellite orbiting Earth to beam pairs of quantum-entangled photons to two Tibetan mountaintops more than 700 miles apart. This distance blew the previous record out of the water. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, this is only the beginning for quantum communication.


Self-folding electronics could enable advanced robotics (video)

Sep 15, 2017 — American Chemical Society

As demand grows for more versatile, advanced robotics and other technologies, the need for components that can enable these applications also increases. Producing such components en masse has been a major challenge. But now, in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, researchers report that they have developed a way to help meet this need by printing electronics that can fold themselves into a desired shape. Watch a video showing the resulting prototypes here.


Cassini’s legacy and the atmospheric chemistry of Titan (video)

Sep 14, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—The Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency, is set to end on Sept. 15. The mission has told us a great deal about the unique and unexpected chemistry of Saturn’s moon Titan, and it has changed the way we think about our own planet and the entire solar system. Learn how in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:


Keychain detector could catch food allergens before it’s too late

Sep 11, 2017 — American Chemical Society

For kids and adults with food allergies, a restaurant outing can be a fraught experience. Even when care is taken, freshly prepared or packaged meals can accidentally become cross-contaminated with an offending food and trigger a reaction. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Nano the development of a new portable allergen-detection system — including a keychain analyzer — that could help prevent trips to the emergency room.


Substance in coffee delays onset of diabetes in laboratory mice

Sep 11, 2017 — American Chemical Society

In recent years, researchers have identified substances in coffee that could help quash the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. But few of these have been tested in animals. Now in study appearing in ACS’ Journal of Natural Products, scientists report that one of these previously untested compounds appears to improve cell function and insulin sensitivity in laboratory mice. The finding could spur the development of new drugs to treat or even prevent the disease.


Making 3-D printing safer

Sep 11, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Within the past decade, 3-D printers have gone from bulky, expensive curiosities to compact, more affordable consumer products. At the same time, concerns have emerged that nanoparticles released from the machines during use could affect consumers’ health. Now researchers report in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology a way to eliminate almost all nanoparticle emissions from some of these printers.


The chemicals we leave behind (video)

Sep 7, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, Everything we use is made out of chemicals. So it’s not surprising that we pick up a lot of foreign molecules from what we bump into all the time, from our multivitamins to the gas we put in our cars. Scientists are now starting to track these everyday chemicals in ways that could be helpful in health and forensic sciences. Learn how in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:


How rubber makes sports possible (video)

Sep 5, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Sports balls of all varieties owe their resilience and reliability to an unusual polymer — one whose derivatives and spinoffs are everywhere you look, from cars to shoes to rocket fuel. Learn about rubber, the all-star’s best friend, in this new video from Reactions just in time for kickoff.


Going ‘green’ with plant-based resins

Aug 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Airplanes, electronics and solar cells are all in demand, but the materials holding these items together — epoxy thermosets — are not environmentally friendly. Now, a group reports in ACS’ journal Macromolecules that they have created a plant-based thermoset that could make devices “greener.”


Fish database could help eliminate the ultimate bait and switch

Aug 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Fish fraud, the misrepresentation of cheaper fish as more expensive ones, is a rampant problem worldwide. Now in a study appearing ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that they are making strides toward the development of a protein database capable of definitively identifying fish species. This information could help nab imposters of salmon, tuna and other popular fish before they reach people’s plates.


Turning pollen into a low-cost fertilizer

Aug 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

As the world population continues to balloon, agricultural experts puzzle over how farms will produce enough food to keep up with demand. One tactic involves boosting crop yields. Toward that end, scientists have developed a method to make a low-cost, biocompatible fertilizer with carbon dots derived from rapeseed pollen. The study, appearing in ACS Omega, found that applying the carbon dots to hydroponically cultivated lettuce promoted its growth by 50 percent.


How cicadas manage to ‘wing it’

Aug 16, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Unlike locusts and many other flying insects, cicadas don’t soar through the air with the greatest of ease. Now in a study appearing the ACS’ The Journal of Physical Chemistry B, scientists report that certain chemical components in the insect’s wings could explain why.


Improving detection of a ‘date rape’ drug

Aug 16, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Because gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), commonly known as a “date rape drug” is rapidly absorbed and metabolized by the body, it’s difficult for law enforcement to tell if someone has been given GHB. Now, scientists report in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry that they have identified a potential biomarker that might lead to tests to detect the compound that could be performed much later than current ones.


Spider peptides battle superbugs and cancer

Aug 16, 2017 — American Chemical Society

As antibiotic resistance rises and fears over superbugs grow, scientists are looking for new treatment options. One area of focus is antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which could someday be an alternative to currently prescribed antibiotics, many of which are becoming increasingly useless against some bacteria. Now, a team reports in ACS Chemical Biology that they have improved the antimicrobial — and anticancer — properties of an AMP from a spider.