American Chemical Society


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American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.Learn more about ACS

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

Personalized ‘earable’ sensor monitors body temperature in real time

Jul 26, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Wireless, wearable sensors are all the rage with millions of people now sporting fitness trackers on their wrists. These devices can count footsteps, monitor heart rate and other vital signs. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Sensors that they have developed a 3-D printed sensor worn on the ear that measures one of the most basic medical indicators of health in real time: core body temperature.

The ups and downs of core body temperature can signal a range of health conditions. The most obvious is an infection, which causes a fever. But temperature fluctuations can also indicate insomnia, fatigue, metabolic function and depression. Current wearable sensors can detect skin temperature, but this can change depending on how hot or cold an environment is. And oral and other thermometers that measure core body temperature are designed only for periodic use and aren’t meant to be strapped on for constant detection. So Ali Javey and colleagues set out to develop a convenient device to monitor core body temperature in real time on a continuous basis.

The researchers integrated data processing circuits, a wireless module and an infrared sensor, which detects ear (and thus core body) temperature, in a 3-D printed device. The disk-like structure covers the ear and can be customized to fit the contours of a person’s ear for a comfortable fit. To ensure that users can still hear clearly while wearing the device, the researchers embedded a microphone to capture and transmit outside sounds to the inner ear. And the Bluetooth module transmits temperature measurements to a custom smartphone app. Testing showed that the “earable” sensor measurements closely matched those of a commercial ear thermometer.—“3D Printed ‘Earable’ Smart Devices for Real-Time Detection of Core Body Temperature

The chemistry of fried chicken (video)

Jul 20, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON,  Battered and deep-fried chicken might be one of the most delicious foods ever. But what makes this summer picnic staple so tasty? It all comes down to the chemistry of frying. In the latest Reactions video, learn how the delicate dance of fat at high temperatures leads to a crispy, savory summer snack:

How dragon blood could save your life (video)

Jul 11, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Chemists have found potential drugs and other really useful compounds in some truly bizarre places in nature. For example, a natural immune defense in the blood of komodo dragons, a sponge armed with resistance to bacterial infection or a 400-million-year-old medical workhorse just might save your life someday.

Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics

Jul 4, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Versatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it’s been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that mimicking the structure of the “powdery alligator-flag” plant has enabled them to make a graphene-based aerogel that meets these needs.

Improving Chinese air pollution leads to business opportunities

Jul 4, 2017 — American Chemical Society

China’s trouble with smog and air pollution is well known, but air quality is beginning to improve as Chinese authorities start to tackle the problem. According to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, their efforts have made China a major market for those in the business of abating and measuring air pollution.

Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from water (video)

Jul 4, 2017 — American Chemical Society

The lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria. Scientists report a new development toward this goal in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogs

Jul 4, 2017 — American Chemical Society

With a sense of smell much greater than humans, dogs are considered the gold standard for explosive detection in many situations. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t room for improvement. In a study appearing in the ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report on a new, more rigorous approach to training dogs and their handlers based on real-time analysis of what canines actually smell when they are exposed to explosive materials.

American Chemical Society files suit against Sci-Hub

Jun 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON,  On June 23, 2017, the American Chemical Society (ACS) filed suit in the United States District Court Eastern District of Virginia against unnamed confederates of Sci-Hub, a self-proclaimed web pirate organization that steals and then illegally reproduces and disseminates copyrighted scientific research articles on the internet. The suit asserts infringement of the professional Society’s copyrights, as well as counterfeiting and infringement of its trademarks.

The Statue of Liberty’s true colors (video)

Jun 28, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — The Statue of Liberty is an iconic blue-green symbol of freedom. But did you know she wasn’t always that color? When France gifted Lady Liberty to the U.S., she was a 305-foot statue with reddish-brown copper skin. Her color change is thanks to about 30 years’ worth of chemistry in the air of New York City harbor. See how this monumental statue transitioned from penny red to chocolate brown to glorious liberty green in this Reactions video, just in time for Independence Day:  .

First dual-targeting nanoparticles lower cancer’s defenses and attack tumors

Jun 21, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment.  But the approach only works in a fraction of patients and can cause nasty side effects. Now, in the journal ACS Nano, scientists report the development of the first dual-cell targeting immunotherapy nanoparticle that slows tumor growth in mice with different cancers. In their study, up to half the mice in one cancer group went into full remission after the treatment.

Immunotherapy works by giving the body’s own immune system a boost in its fight against disease. In cancer patients, there are two main lines of immunotherapy: One disables cancer cells’ ability to hide from the immune system, and the other recruits the body’s T cells to destroy tumors. Jonathan P. Schneck and colleagues wanted to see if they could combine these two tactics with one nanoparticle-based platform.

 

The chemistry of olive oil (video)

Jun 20, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Whether you sop it up with bread or use it to boost your cooking, olive oil is awesome. But a lot of chemistry goes on in that bottle that can make or break a product. Extra virgin olive oil is the most expensive (and most delicious) variety, in part thanks to its low acidity. Check out the latest Reactions video for more olive oil chemistry, including how to keep yours fresh and how to best use it to give your food a flavor boost

Beetles spark development of color-changing nanoparticles for commercial use

Jun 15, 2017 — American Chemical Society

Inspired by the varying colors that gleam off of beetle shells, scientists have developed color-shifting nanoparticles that can change hue even after being embedded into a material. A report on the new, inexpensive technique, which could lead to the production of easier-to-read sensors and anti-tampering tags, appears in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Bacteria from cystic fibrosis patient could help thwart antibiotic-resistant TB

Jun 15, 2017 — American Chemical Society

The number of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases is rising globally. But a newly discovered natural antibiotic — produced by bacteria from the lung infection in a cystic fibrosis patient — could help fight these infections. Lab testing reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society shows that the compound is active against multi-drug resistant strains.

Do anti-wrinkle creams work? (video)

Jun 13, 2017 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON,  — Want a younger, more perfect-looking you? Skin can stay firm and stretchy thanks to protein fibers called collagen and elastin in the tissue beneath the surface. But environmental factors like smoking or ultraviolet rays from the sun can produce antioxidants that damage skin cells’ ability to make more of these supports. Anti-wrinkle treatments claim they keep the skin surface fresh and rejuvenate these cells, but do they work? To find out whether an over-the-counter jar of cream could make 40 the new 20, we dive into the science:

Imaging technique could be game changer for pharma

Jun 10, 2017 — American Chemical Society

In drug development, the body can be something of a black box. We take medicine and observe the overall effects, but what happens inside the body largely remains a mystery. To help clear up this picture, researchers are turning to imaging techniques in tissue and animal testing. The step has gained ground in the drug industry, according to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.