Anthony J. Tarquinto


Anthony J. Tarquinto photo
Anthony J. Tarquinto is an independent financial adviser based in Aliso Viejo California. Anthony is the author of “The Real 40 Year-Old Virgin of Orange County.” (Xlibris 2010) which is available at Google Books.

Most Recent Articles by Anthony J. Tarquinto:

Culture War in Europe

Apr 13, 2016 — Anthony J. Tarquinto

The continent that gave us Beethoven, blue-water navies, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution is in existential crisis. Since early 2014, millions of people from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and northern Africa have streamed into Europe’s southern periphery, with more on the way. Western elites have criticized some nations for not doing enough to absorb the influx from war-torn countries. What they don’t realize is that refugees of war often drag the war along with them. From our point of view, in the context of the greater “war on terror” is a culture war.

One million asylum seekers have entered Greece via Turkey since last summer. While they are not the barbarian hordes of the fifteenth century Ottoman Empire, they have ignored fundamental cultural expectations of the host countries. During the Talking Points segment on Fox News on the night of the ISIS massacre in Brussels, Bill O’Reilly remarked that ISIS uses terrorism “in order to impose Islamic culture.” It is unknown at this point how many ISIS fighters have entered the European Union (EU) through Greece, but what is not in doubt is that Greece is overwhelmed by a group of people who do not speak Greek nor have any knowledge of Hellenic culture.


Dollarpocalypse Now

Oct 31, 2014 — Anthony J. Tarquinto

In the 1979 film Apocalypse Now, Colonel Walter E. Kurtz (played by Marlon Brando) utters, “the horror, the horror,” on his deathbed. He might as well have been talking about the U.S. dollar.


Get Those Pipeline Deals Moving

Apr 12, 2013 — Anthony J. Tarquinto

Golda Meir’s only gripe with Moses was that “he took us 40 years through the desert in order to bring us to the one spot in the Middle East that has no oil.” Perhaps Moses should have gone to Canada. Canada’s Gross Domestic Product doubled between 2002 and 2010, and from 2008 to the end of 2011, inflation-adjusted economic output grew 2.8% in Canada vs. 1.7% in the United States.


The NHL Lockout: Blame America

Sep 25, 2012 — Anthony J. Tarquinto

After September 11, 2001, the left-wing ganged up on American conservatives and blamed us for all of the hatred and vitriol. “As long as you’re doing what the U.S is doing in the world, you can anticipate a natural and inevitable response of the sort that occurred on 9/11,” said ethnic studies professor Ward Churchill.  “God (expletive) America,” exhorted longtime Barack Obama confidante Jeremiah Wright.


Low Interest Rates and Redistribution of Wealth

May 7, 2012 — Anthony J. Tarquinto

“Redistribution of wealth” has become a popular phrase in conservative circles lately. One way of looking at it might be through the lens of monetary policy. Governments around the world often weaken and strengthen their currencies due to trade imbalances, geopolitical environment, and the like. Brazil has implemented capital controls in recent years to tamp down the flow of “hot money” into its economy in an attempt to stave off inflation, while the Swiss National Bank has put a lid on the franc to quell deflation fears. The Canadian people should pay close attention to their central bank, so that they don’t fall victim to what we in America are going through.


Bank on North Dakota

Jan 5, 2012 — Anthony J. Tarquinto

The December 8, 2011 Wall Street Journal headline “Banks Prep for Life After Euro” is an acknowledgement that nation-states in the European Union are finally coming to terms with the possible end of the common currency.

Some central banks in Europe have started weighing contingency plans to prepare for the possibility that countries leave the euro zone or the currency union breaks apart entirely. At least one—the Central Bank of Ireland—is evaluating whether it needs to secure additional access to printing presses in case it has to churn out new bank notes to support a reborn national currency.(1)