ISRAEL21c


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ISRAEL21c was founded in 2001, in the wake of the Second Intifada, to broaden public understanding of Israel beyond typical portrayals in the mainstream media.The organization’s founders – Israeli-American technology executives – understood the great power of the Internet and developed a first-of-its kind online product with global appeal and reach.

Most Recent Articles by ISRAEL21c:

10 Israeli innovations that will outsmart superbugs

Sep 13, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Antibiotics are one of the most effective ways to treat bacterial infections. However, they have been overprescribed and misprescribed for years, leading to the development of bacterial strains that are resistant to specific antibiotics.

The World Health Organization considers this one of the biggest threats to global health because antimicrobial resistant (AMR) infections kill more than 700,000 people worldwide every year.


How one little sensor will make your life better

Sep 13, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Vayyar sensors provide a 3D map of people in a room without revealing identities

How did an Israeli startup evolve from using radio frequency (RF) technology intended to detect breast cancer to creating palm-sized devices that can monitor passengers in self-driving cars? That’s the remarkable story of Vayyar Imaging,  which is building a multi-purpose sensor with real-life uses that sound straight out of science fiction.

Vayyar’s three cofounders – Raviv Melamed, Miri Ratner and Naftali Chayat – discovered in 2011 that each had a family member suffering from cancer. They set out to make a difference. The product they built was a thumb-sized sensor with 24 built-in RF antennas.


Unique Israeli research reveals why honeybees are dying

Sep 13, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

If you give a “menu” to a bee, it will instinctively choose dishes that provide the right balance of nutrients: sugary nectar plus pollen full of protein, fatty acids and micronutrients.

That’s one of the findings of groundbreaking experiments performed at Israel’s Benjamin Triwaks Bee Research Center at Hebrew University’s Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture in Rehovot.


Israeli docs save Gaza dad’s hand from ‘tree man syndrome’

Sep 6, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Orthopedic and plastic surgeons at Jerusalem’s Hadassah University Medical Center-Ein Kerem successfully treated 42-year-old Gaza resident Muhammad Taluli, whose hand was disfigured from an extremely rare contagious condition, epidermodysplasia verruciformis, or “tree man syndrome.”

Taluli suffered from painful tumors over his entire hand for the past decade, according to lead surgeon Dr. Michael Chernofsky.


Haifa hospital tests first implant for heart failure

Sep 6, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

A 72-year old Canadian man has become the world’s first recipient of an Israeli-developed implant to treat diastolic heart failure – a fairly common condition for which there is no effective long-term treatment.


The minimally invasive surgery was performed on July 26th at Rambam Health Care Campus, a medical center in Haifa, by a multidisciplinary team led by cardiologists Gil Bolotin, director of cardiac surgery, and Arthur Kerner, senior physician in the Interventional Cardiology Unit.

 


Israeli aid pours into Texas to heal hearts and homes

Sep 6, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Miriam Ballin’s heart sank when she saw the water line – a calling card of Hurricane Harvey — ringing her former childhood home in Houston. But she couldn’t linger. Urgent work awaited her as leader of the United Hatzalah Psychotrauma and Crisis Response Unit.

The voluntary six-person team of Israeli mental-health professionals landed in Texas last Thursday morning on behalf of the Israel Rescue Coalition. It is one of several Israeli humanitarian-aid groups sending personnel to Texas.


Look into my eyes: Do you see early signs of Alzheimer’s?

Aug 30, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Romantics claim that you can see a person’s soul through their eyes. Apparently, you can also see whether they will be suffering in the future from Alzheimer’s disease.

The same biomarkers that accumulate in the brain – proteins called beta-amyloids that clump together into sticky “plaque” that are the signs of Alzheimer’s disease – appear in the retina of the eyes up to 15 years before the onset of any symptoms.


Israel sends aid to flood-battered Texas

Aug 30, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Two teams of Israeli aid experts are on their way to Texas to provide vital relief and psychosocial support to the thousands of people who have lost everything in the catastrophic Tropical Storm Harvey.

The storm, which first hit Texas on Sunday and continues to plague the beleaguered state with pounding rain, has left nine dead, and tens of thousands of people homeless as flood waters have poured through city streets in Houston, the fourth-largest city in the United States. The storm is thought to have affected 6.8 million people in 18 countries, a quarter of the Texas population.


In world first, Israeli man gets lab-grown bone tissue injected in arm

Aug 23, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Medical history was made at Emek Medical Center in Afula this week when semi-liquid live human bone tissue grown in a lab from a 40-year-old patient’s own fat cells was transplanted into the patient’s arm by injection.


10 of the hottest self-driving technologies from Israel

Aug 16, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

“Car manufacturing is not about tires or brakes anymore, but the technology inside the car – the sensors and algorithms.”

How did Israel, a country that has no domestic car manufacturing industry, become a worldwide powerhouse for autonomous-driving technology (also known as self-driving cars)?


Israeli scientist develops early diagnostic test for Parkinson’s

Aug 9, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

The exciting news coming out of Israel, that a scientist has developed a groundbreaking test to categorically detect Parkinson’s disease, is giving the medical and science worlds hope for the future.


Radical new drug-testing tech could dramatically cut animal testing

Aug 2, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

After spending an average of $2.5 billion to develop a single new drug, sometimes pharma companies have to pull it from the market due to a bad outcome that was not detected in clinical studies.

That’s what happened in 2000, when a promising Type 2 diabetes drug called troglitazone led to idiosyncratic (unexplained) liver damage in one of every 60,000 users.

The troglitazone mystery wasn’t solved until March 2016, when a novel “liver-on-a-chip” platform developed by Hebrew University of Jerusalem Prof. Yaakov Nahmias revealed what no animal or human tests could: even low concentrations of this drug caused liver stress before any damage could be seen.

“It was the first time an organ-on-chip device could predict information to help pharmaceutical companies define risk for idiosyncratic toxicity,” Nahmias tells ISRAEL21c.—More…


5 Israeli precision-ag technologies making farms smarter

Jul 19, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Israeli precision agriculture started with a drip and became a deluge.

The “drip” is drip irrigation. The single most significant advance in modern agriculture, invented in Israel by Simcha Blass and his son Yeshayahu in 1959, increases crop yield, quality and consistency while using less water.

Netafim, the multinational company founded in 1965 to commercialize the Blass invention, remains the foremost name in irrigation technologies worldwide.

The “deluge” includes a host of farm management solutions. No fewer than 70 Israeli companies make tools for measuring, analyzing, monitoring and automating processes to give crops and soil exactly what they need, exactly when and where they need it, ensuring minimal waste of resources and maximum efficiency and yield.—More…


Measuring a patient’s vital signs without any contact

Jul 12, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

Our bodies are in constant motion – not only on the outside but within. Our hearts beat, our chests rise and fall with each breath, the composition of our blood changes as we take in alcohol or sugar. Each motion, great and small, generates vibrations on the molecular level.

Two scientists – Zeev Zalevsky, professor of electro-optics at Bar-Ilan University, and Javier Garcia-Monreal, professor of physics and optics at the University of Valencia in Spain – have been collaborating for a dozen years on developing ways to measure the tiny, “nanometric” vibrations the body emits.

The result of their decade-long research is a revolutionary way to monitor patients’ vital signs without any physical contact – no more intrusive cables, wires, tubes or IVs.

In 2015, Zalevsky and Garcia-Monreal formed a company, ContinUse Biometrics, to commercialize their work and bring it to consumers and medical professionals.—More…


Jewelry discovered in Crusader-era kitchen in Israel

Jul 5, 2017 — ISRAEL21c

If you ever wondered who did most of the cooking in medieval Israel, a Crusader fortress in the city of Modi’in will put those doubts to rest: it was the women.

While excavating an archaeological site called Givat Tittora, diggers uncovered a treasure of coins, rings, bracelets and cosmetic tools among the cooking pots, jars, serving dishes and ancient clay ovens.

Most of the jewelry was found by a volunteer archaeologist, Mati Yohananoff, a regular participant in the Givat Tittora excavation. “These finds indicate the kind of activity traditionally associated with women’s domestic work,” he said.

“It seems that the cooks of the time were not sufficiently careful with the jewelry they wore while cooking and baking,” explained Avraham Tendler, excavation director for the Israel Antiquities Authority.—More…