Lee Cary

Since November 2007, Lee Cary has written hundreds of articles for several websites including the American Thinker, and Breitbart’s Big Journalism and Big Government (as “Archy Cary”). His work has been quoted on national television (Sean Hannity) and on nationally syndicated radio (Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin). He is quoted in Jerome Corsi’s book “The Obama Nation,” in Mark Levin’s “Liberty and Tyranny.” His pieces have posted on the Drudge Report and on the website Real Clear Politics. Cary holds a B.S. in Economics from Northern Illinois University, and a Masters and a Doctorate in Theology from the Methodist seminary at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL. He served in Vietnam with the U.S. Army in Military Intelligence. Cary lives in Texas.

Most Recent Articles by Lee Cary:

Department of Justice Blueprint for Fake Investigations

Dec 9, 2017 — Lee Cary

Department of Justice Blueprint for Fake Investigations
A National Review article, posted on December 4, 2017, written by former federal prosecutor Andrew McCarthy, entitled “It Is Now an Obstruction Investigation: Which means that it’s an impeachment investigation,” affirmed what’s long been obvious to many.

The purpose of the Mueller investigation is not now, nor was it ever, to prove collusion between Russia and the Trump Presidential Campaign.  That stated purpose was, from Day 1, a red herring.
McCarthy fails to address the real motive behind the Mueller investigation.


Trump’s Win Broke the Silence of the Lambs

Nov 27, 2017 — Lee Cary

Trump’s Win Broke the Silence of the Lambs
The election of Donald J. Trump gave a voice to the Lambs.

The Sheep Dogs told them not to worry:A Clinton victory is inevitable. 

The big megaphone of the liberal media told the Lambs: “Trump’s a clown, a misogynist, a racist, a rich, white male. In matters of governing, he knows nothing. Hillary has a lock on it.”


George W. Bush’s Speech on Trumpism

Oct 23, 2017 — Lee Cary

Bush, Obama, Trump

After eight years of political silence, what prompted former President George W. Bush’s speech on 29 October 2017, at the “Spirit of Liberty: At Home, In The World” event in New York, described, in the words of CNN, as “a major smackdown on Trumpism?”

“Smackdown” is a gross exaggeration. It was less than that. And it was more than that.


America’s next alt-left holiday assault comes on Thanksgiving

Oct 13, 2017 — Lee Cary

The next holiday targeted by America’s alt-left will be Thanksgiving, November 23.

October 19th passed with only minor damage to the latest target of the social warriors – Christopher Columbus – as Bob Lee statues across the U.S. welcomed the temporary reprieve.

A few cities in the Lower 48 got deep into the spirit of anti-Columbus Day (CD) with a substitution: Indigenous Peoples’ Day (IDP).


An 1984 lynching of history in 2017 Dallas

Oct 2, 2017 — Lee Cary

The question “Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History?” was posed in the first of a six-part series recently posted on the Canada Free Press.

The answer is—Yes, and it has.


Dallas’ Dealey Plaza has a Confederate Monument

Sep 17, 2017 — Lee Cary

The Dallas Mayor’s Task Force for Confederate Monuments continues its hunt for “Confederate propaganda” – as Mayor Rawlings characterized the now removed statue of Robert E. Lee.

As the citizen task force, appointed by the Mayor and the City Council, ferrets out public channels of conveying Confederate propaganda, they’re being methodically tutored in the racist, wrong-headed thinking that prevailed among the white population of the post-bellum South.  Dallas included.


Mayor Rawling’s Task Force on Confederate Monuments

Sep 12, 2017 — Lee Cary

Mayor Rawlings’ Task Force on Confederate Monuments should consider if the city of Dallas needs a new name.

U.S. Vice President George Mifflin Dallas is widely seen as the city’s namesake. Among multiple sources that make that claim are the United States Senate and the April 19, 1925 edition of the Dallas Morning News. 

Dallas: The Series
Part 1: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History?
Part 2: Who was George Mifflin Dallas in American History?
Part 3: Life of George Mifflin Dallas, Vice President of the United States
Part 4: City of Dallas is named after a Democrat Party politician whose support for the Fugitive Slave Act
Part 5: Dallas praised Pennsylvania’s denunciation of slavery in 1835
Part 6: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History? (Part 6)


Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History? (Part 6)

Sep 11, 2017 — Lee Cary

This last installment in a series concerning the deliberation underway in Dallas, Texas as to whether to remove its Confederate monuments, will take us to the edge of the Civil War.

Some at the Court of St. James saw the U.S. Minister to Britain as a representative of slavery

In her 1968 article for the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, entitled “Difficulties of a Diplomat: George Mifflin Dallas in London,” Sister Therese A. Donovan, Boston College, wrote:


City of Dallas is named after a Democrat Party politician whose support for the Fugitive Slave Act

Sep 9, 2017 — Lee Cary

The City of Dallas is named after a Democrat Party, antebellum politician whose support for the Fugitive Slave Acts of 1793 and 1850 was consistent, clear and unequivocal.

On January 11, 1864, two weeks after Dallas died, former Pennsylvania Congressman Charles J. Biddle eulogized Dallas before the Bar of Philadelphia.

In the eulogy, Biddle quoted at length from a speech delivered by Dallas soon after the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed by Congress on September 18, 1850, as part of the Compromise of 1850 between Southern slave-holding states and Northern Free Soilers.

Dallas: The Series
Part 1: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History?
Part 2: Who was George Mifflin Dallas in American History?
Part 3: Life of George Mifflin Dallas, Vice President of the United States
Part 4: City of Dallas is named after a Democrat Party politician whose support for the Fugitive Slave Act
Part 5: Dallas praised Pennsylvania’s denunciation of slavery in 1835
Part 6: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History? (Part 6)


Dallas praised Pennsylvania’s denunciation of slavery in 1835

Sep 9, 2017 — Lee Cary

What do the documented racial sentiments of George Mifflin Dallas tell us about the man after whom Dallas, Texas is named?

On July 4, 1835, George Mifflin Dallas spoke at the Zion Church, Easton, Pennsylvania at the request of the Washington and Franklin Literary Societies, Lafayette College.

Dallas: The Series
Part 1: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History?
Part 2: Who was George Mifflin Dallas in American History?
Part 3: Life of George Mifflin Dallas, Vice President of the United States
Part 4: City of Dallas is named after a Democrat Party politician whose support for the Fugitive Slave Act
Part 5: Dallas praised Pennsylvania’s denunciation of slavery in 1835
Part 6: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History? (Part 6)


Life of George Mifflin Dallas, Vice President of the United States

Sep 7, 2017 — Lee Cary

Throughout his political career, Dallas believed in popular sovereignty regarding states’ rights. To him that meant, until the Constitution was amended, each state had the right to decide the slavery issue for itself.

The “Life of George Mifflin Dallas, Vice President of the United States” was originally prepared in September 1844, by the Democrat Committee of Publication, and then revised in November 1847. Quotes from Dallas within the publication document his understanding of popular sovereignty applied to the issue of slavery in new territories.

A debate, following the war with Mexico, raged between those who believed the federal government should designate which new territories, gained after the war, should be free and which should be slave.

Dallas: The Series
Part 1: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History?
Part 2: Who was George Mifflin Dallas in American History?
Part 3: Life of George Mifflin Dallas, Vice President of the United States
Part 4: City of Dallas is named after a Democrat Party politician whose support for the Fugitive Slave Act
Part 5: Dallas praised Pennsylvania’s denunciation of slavery in 1835
Part 6: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History? (Part 6)


Who was George Mifflin Dallas in American History?

Sep 7, 2017 — Lee Cary

Does the Dallas task force on Confederate monuments know what the antebellum politician, for whom their city was named, thought about the Congressional Acts that supported slavery? 

George Mifflin Dallas was born July 10, 1792, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Before he died on December 31, 1864, he served as an American diplomat to two countries, and was elected or appointed to government service at the city, state, and national levels representing the Democratic Party.

Here is a list of most of his major achievements:

  • Graduated (age 18) from Princeton with highest honors in 1810;
  • Admitted to the Bar in 1813;
  • Elected Mayor of Philadelphia in 1828;
  • Appointed U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, 1829-1831;
  • Elected U.S. Senator (D. Penn.), December 13, 1831-March 4, 1833;
  • Appointed Attorney General of Pennsylvania,1833-1835;
  • Appointed by President Martin Van Buren as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Russia, 1837-1839;
  • Elected Vice President of the United Stated under President James K. Polk, March 4, 1845-March 4,1849; and,
  • Appointed by President Franklin Pierce as Minister to Great Britain, 1856-1861.

Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History?

Sep 5, 2017 — Lee Cary

The Mayor of Dallas Texas called Confederate monuments symbols of injustice. So, what will a city task force on monuments say about the city’s namesake?

Introduction: Dallas, Texas is among U.S. cities that have removed, or are considering removing, Confederate monuments from public lands. In Dallas, an appointed task force is deciding if that city joins the 2017 Great Purge of American History. The integrity of their deliberations requires they review the history of George Mufflin Dallas, Vice President during the James K. Polk Presidency (March 1845 – March 1849).

In a series of 6 postings, a case will be made for applying the same moral standards to the man Dallas as is applied to Confederate monuments. If that happens, the question may become: Should the City of Dallas be renamed? 

Dallas: The Series
Part 1: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History?
Part 2: Who was George Mifflin Dallas in American History?
Part 3: Life of George Mifflin Dallas, Vice President of the United States
Part 4: City of Dallas is named after a Democrat Party politician whose support for the Fugitive Slave Act
Part 5: Dallas praised Pennsylvania’s denunciation of slavery in 1835
Part 6: Will Dallas join the 2017 Great Purge of American History? (Part 6)


The line from Ferguson to Charlottesville

Aug 23, 2017 — Lee Cary

The turmoil in Ferguson, Missouri back in 2014 was the antecedent of the recent riot in Charlottesville, Virginia. Both are examples of the street theater of “a new civil rights movement.”

In November-December 2014, the website American Thinker posted a series of nine articles that tracked the persons, groups, and political forces at play in the town of about 20,000 north of St. Louis, Missouri.

(The articles, from first to last, are posted here: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.)


Answering Trump’s question: “Where does it stop?”

Aug 20, 2017 — Lee Cary

In a recent press conference held in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York City, President Trump asked the gathered reporters, rhetorically, “Where does it stop?”

“It” is the attack on monuments.


The only sure answer to Trump’s question is that it stops when protest reaches the point of diminishing - on the cusp of negative—returns to the protesters.

How far might things go before reaching that point?


The Left’s War on Confederate Monuments

Aug 15, 2017 — Lee Cary

The American Left has declared war on Confederate monuments.

Not just Southern military leaders – most notably General Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Virginia – but even the bronze statue known as “Old Joe” in a “memorial to men of the Gainesville [Florida] area who lost their lives in the Civil War.”  Old Joe is being evicted from where he’s stood, motionless, outside the Alachua County Administrative Building, since 1904.

The metallic history of the Confederate States of America (1861-1865) is being erased from parks, courthouses, and campuses across the nation. Can the book banning and burning be far behind?

Well, if this is how it is to be, let’s take a page from Saul Alinsky’s book, “Rules for Radicals” – specifically his Rule #4: “Make the enemy live up to its own book of rules.” 

And, let’s start with The Southern Manifesto of 1956.  


U.S. Department of Justice and the D.C. Swamp

Aug 11, 2017 — Lee Cary

As an enabler of the D.C. Swamp, the U.S. Department of Justice must be drained first, if freedom is to survive in America.

According to a Department of Justice (DoJ) website, a “somewhat enigmatic Latin motto” appears on the official seal of the department: Qui Pro Domina Justitia Sequitur.  Its history, like the history of the seal itself, is unclear.


Washington Post copies Operation Garbo

Aug 9, 2017 — Lee Cary

Juan Pujol Garcia does not write for the Washington Post. He once had the talent to, but he died in 1988, at age 76—a decorated hero of World War II.

Garcia’s code name within British Security Service MI5 was “Garbo.” Garbo was a Spanish citizen whose hatred of the European Communist and Fascist regimes of his time motivated him to volunteer, in 1939, to become a spy for the British.

He had no experience in the espionage business. What he did have, though, was a vivid imagination.

While he worked for MI5, his code name within German Intelligence was “Alaric.” After most of the German spies in Britain were compromised early in the war, Garbo emerged as Abwehr’s most reliable and trusted source of intelligence. Eventually, the German High Command decorated him with the Iron Cross.


Dunkirk and the 2016 U.S. Presidential campaign

Aug 2, 2017 — Lee Cary

The currently-running 2017 movie version of the World War II events surrounding Dunkirk did not address how Allied forces ended up surrounded by the Germans in late May 1940.

Here’s one explanation: Britain and France expected a static war with Germany patterned after World War I, but Germany’s army was mobile and flexible. Two different sets of war rules were at play.

The soldiers who were heroically, some would say miraculously, rescued from the beaches by small, civilian craft were the victims of outdated strategies and tactics.
There’s a parallel between the Battle of Dunkirk and the 2016 U.S. Presidential campaign.


America’s two-party political system is dying

Jul 29, 2017 — Lee Cary

The failure of the Republican-controlled U.S. Senate to repeal ObamaCare signals that both major political parties have accepted the central role of the federal government in controlling the American healthcare industry.

A similar seminal moment came, in 2012, with regard to federal fiscal and monetary policies, when the former Director of the Office of Management and Budget under President Ronald Reagan, David A. Stockman, wrote: