Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh


Listen to Dr. Paugh on Butler on Business, every Wednesday to Thursday at 10:49 AM ESTDr. Ileana Johnson Paugh, Romanian Conservative is a freelance writer, author, radio commentator, and speaker. Her books, “Echoes of Communism", "Liberty on Life Support" and "U.N. Agenda 21: Environmental Piracy," "Communism 2.0: 25 Years Later" are available at Amazon in paperback and Kindle.Her commentaries reflect American Exceptionalism, the economy, immigration, and education.Visit her website, ileanajohnson.com

Most Recent Articles by Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh:

United Nations Mandates “Sustainable Tourism”

Dec 10, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

United Nations Mandates Sustainable Tourism
During my twenty-two visits to Venice, I saw and heard the frustration and disdain locals have for tourists. We were not just an imposition in their daily lives, crowding their beloved city, their favorite restaurants, water buses, museums, operas, blocking their narrow alleys, their canals, and often entrances to their apartments. We caused wakes with our huge cruise ships and further destruction to their already fragile buildings, infrastructure, and ecosystem.

But we were a necessary evil that helped many Venetians live off tourism. They complained about Americans who trekked yearly by millions to see La Serenissima, yet have allowed economic refugees to invade and take over their businesses. We were even blamed for their demographic suicide.

The group Italia Nostra (Our Italy) wants the Italian government to ban cruise ships in the harbor and to require large groups to book their visit ahead of time. Posters around the city make it abundantly clear that some residents do not welcome tourists at all. Academia predicts that “the native population could be zero as early as 2030.” Apparently cruise ship visitors increased five-fold and rents have increased accordingly, making it impossible for locals to afford a place in the city.


Why Do We Give Christmas Gifts?

Dec 9, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

Why Do We Give Christmas Gifts?
The Christmas tradition of gift-giving is tied by many to the Wise Men who gave Jesus Frankincense, Gold, and Myrrh. Frankincense was a perfume used in Jewish rituals of worship. Gold was the symbol of Kings, and myrrh was a perfume used on dead bodies.

The historical Saint Nikolaos of Myra was a fourth century Greek Bishop of Lycia. He is said to have given secret gifts of coins to those who left their shoes outside, a practice celebrated on his feast day, St. Nicholas Day on December 6 in the West and December 19 in the East. He is the model for Santa Claus. The patron saint of sailors, merchants, archers, repentant thieves, children, brewers, pawnbrokers, and students, he is revered by Anglicans, Catholics, Lutherans, Orthodox, and by some Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, and Reformed churches.


Christmas, the Season of Faith, Family, and Charity

Dec 8, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

Christmas, the Season of Faith, Family, and CharityChristmas was my Dad bringing home proudly a scraggly fir with sparse branches - fragrant with the smell of winter, tiny icicles hanging from the branches, miniature crystal daggers, melting on my mom’s well-scrubbed parquet floor. I never knew nor asked how he could afford it from his $70 a month salary that barely covered the communist subsidized rent, utilities, and food. No matter how bare the branches of my Christmas tree were, it was magical to me.

We decorated it together with homemade paper baskets filled with hard candy, raisins, and small butter cookies, crepe paper garlands, small pretzels, an orange wrapped in fine tissue paper coming all the way from Israel, a few apples dangling from a string, and 12 red and green 3-inch candles clipped carefully away from overhanging branches that could catch on fire.

Mom’s hand-stitched table cloth made a convenient tree skirt. Two metal bars forged by hand helped Dad nail the tree to the floor at the foot of the couch where I slept in the living room that doubled as my bedroom.


What’s in Packaged Food?

Dec 5, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

What’s in Packaged Food?
Americans’ collective waist has been inching up every year and blood pressure increased thanks in part to our sedentary lifestyles and to the amount of sugar and salt in all food. For convenience and to save time, we often eat fast food and restaurant rich foods and walk much less than our slender European counterparts. Portion size is also much larger than we need.

Consumers are busy, too trustworthy, and not very fond of reading packaging labels; food producers count on that. According to nutritionists and medical professionals cited by Michelle Crouch, manufacturers hide ingredients they should list on the packaging under the label of “natural flavoring” in order to deceive consumers. And the deception is massive. (Michelle Crouch, “Fifty Things Food Manufacturers Won’t Tell You”)

How do you hide sugar? By giving it different names such as “high fructose corn syrup, cane crystals, dextrose, evaporated can juice, agave nectar, and fruit juice concentrate.” In doing so, the amount of sugar does not appear as the number one ingredient on the list. Walter Willett, M.D., said that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) might eventually require food labeling to show all types of sugar contained and print them on the package as “added sugars.”


With Gratitude and Honor

Nov 21, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

With Gratitude and Honor

Gratitude and honor are remarkable character traits that I’ve always searched for in my fellow humans. Imagine my pleasant surprise when I found them in a millennial! It was not a millennial born and raised in this country but in Romania, in the beautiful Apuseni Mountains of western Transylvania.

In Rosia Montana, the county of Alba, Tica Darie, a 25-year old entrepreneur, saw locally produced merino wool and artisan knitting skills as a source of golden opportunity, fleeced from the flock of merino sheep and turned into socks, sweaters, scarves, and other accessories that the fashionably young and other customers could wear. The label is Made in Rosia Montana.


The Right Man for Healing and a Rare Find

Nov 16, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

The Right Man for Healing and a Rare Find
I was not sure my ENT specialist was a good fit for me even though I read the glowing praises framed on his office walls, praises coming from his patients, colleagues, and other doctors. The young man seemed to know what he was doing but his bedside manner was brief and rather cold.
I attributed his demeanor to his introverted personality, his professionalism, and to his respect for his patients’ time. Very punctual, he very seldom made anybody wait to see him, he was always on time.

One day I realized that he was much more caring on the inside than he let people see. A young woman with her mom and a three-year old in tow had an appointment to see the doctor. The receptionist, Lupe, asked her if she was prepared to pay for that day’s visit. The young woman had a grief-stricken look on her face and wondered how much the visit was going to be. The receptionist told her that she did not know because each patient was different, depending on the problem. The young woman replied in a sad and disappointed voice that she will reschedule until such a time that she would have enough cash on hand to pay for the visit.


How Free Are You?

Nov 13, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

How Free Are You?
What happens if you live off-grid?

If you live independent of utilities, water, and sewer, and provide your own energy through solar panels, have your own sewer system, and use rainwater, you may run into problems with your local government. Robin Speroni of Cape Coral, Florida, was sued by local officials that her off-grid home was illegal, citing the International Property Maintenance Code. She was found guilty of not being hooked to the water supply.

“Speroni is still being hassled by the municipality of Cape Coral for not having a connection to city water or property sewage. This is in spite of the fact that the city capped her sewers themselves.”


The Tyranny of the Oppressed and of Minorities

Nov 4, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

The Tyranny of the Oppressed and of Minorities
“We condemn freedom of speech that hurts other people’s feelings” – student poster photographed at a rally in California

Half of the U.S. population believes that it is a good idea and high time that our country became socialist, on the way to communism. We are told ad nauseam by the highly organized Marxist left that the other communist countries that failed so miserably, oppressed their own people, and killed millions of them, failed because they did not do it the right way. What this “right way” is, nobody really understands or can even attempt to explain. But they repeat it because it sounds right and progressively utopian.


Thomas Edison and Henry Ford’s Estates in Fort Myers, Florida (Part II)

Oct 30, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

Thomas Edison and Henry Ford’s Estates in Fort Myers
Thomas Edison and Henry Ford met in 1896 at a convention when Ford was working as chief engineer at the Detroit Edison Illuminating Company. “Sixteen years later the two men would meet again to discuss using Edison’s storage battery for the Model T.”

Edison invited Ford and his family to go camping in the Everglades in 1914; it was the first time Ford visited Fort Myers. He was so enchanted with the area that he purchased three acres of riverfront property adjacent to his friend’s estate and a Craftsman-style bungalow, The Mangoes, for $20,000, which he sold in 1945 for the same price.

The two industrialist friends spent many winters exploring Florida, relaxing, bird watching (one of Clara and Henry’s favorite activities), fishing, and planning business strategies, new inventions, and innovations. Their lengthy discussions and planning yielded products and innovations that would change the world.

Thomas Edison and Henry Ford’s Estates in Fort Myers, Florida (Part 1)


Edison and Ford Estates in Fort Myers, Florida

Oct 27, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

Edison’s Seminole Lodge (main house)Hurricane Irma hit Florida with a vengeance six weeks ago, the island had to be evacuated, and the ocean receded from its bay. Siesta Key was spared severe devastation but its neighbors to the south, Naples, San Marco, and Fort Myers did not fare as well. Irma hit them as a strong category 3 hurricane. The evidence is painful to see in the mounds of chopped up uprooted trees and torn vegetation yet to be picked up in front of every home.

The Edison/Ford Estate lost 100 old trees, shrubs, and other tropical vegetation that used to shade almost 20 acres of property, now fully exposed to the sun. Vegetation grows fast in Florida but 100-year-old trees are hard to replace. The estate museum opened on October 14, 2017 for the first time since the severe winds devastated the once shady and lush green gardens, still beautiful but showing signs of distress.


Cultural Marxism’s Indoctrination into Islam through Opera

Oct 24, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

Cultural Marxism's Indoctrination into Islam through Opera

The “enlightened” and multicultural” public from Cluj Napoca recently attended Karl Jenkins’ The Armed Man, a Mass for Peace, an “opera that included a Muslim muezzin chanting the call to prayer.” It was a thinly-veiled attempt to force Romanians to accept the Cultural Marxism agenda of the European Union which is implemented through the heavy islamization of Europe’s population.

Five Romanians interrupted the opera by singing the Romanian National Anthem upon hearing the infamous Allahu Akbar shouted on stage by one of the characters. But their singing did not last long. Special police escorted the protesters out of the theater and the local police fined them.


Communist Indoctrination or Common Core Mis-Education?

Oct 5, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

During a recent interview about life in communist Romania, Bill Muckler asked me a pointed question about the quality of education I received under a totalitarian system of government.

Aside from absurd courses such as Scientific Socialism and Socialist Economics, courses which were aimed at legitimizing an otherwise disastrous economic model of Five-Year Plans which were put in place by the Communist Party, by apparatchiks who often had grandiose pipe dreams but had no idea how to translate them into reality given the lack of resources and education of those in power, I received a good education in terms of the subjects taught. The indoctrination efforts did not work on me at all.


Catalonia and Its Referendum on Independence from Spain

Oct 3, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

Catalonia is located on the eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula and has a population of 7.52 million people. Catalonia has a distinct history, culture, and language. Its main city, Barcelona, was captured in 1714 by the first Bourbon king of Spain, Felipe V, and Catalonia lost its autonomy. Catalonia’s National Day, September 11, commemorates this event.

The regional Government of Catalonia decided that a referendum would take place on Catalan independence on October 1, 2017. But the Constitutional Court of Spain declared on September 6, 2017 that the referendum and its invocation violated the Constitution.


Revisionist History, Fascism, and Holocaust Survivor Eva Moses Kor

Sep 30, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

As the socialist teachers in the halls of academia around the country continue the indoctrination of American children into the utopian society of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin, Mao, Ceausescu, Castro, the rocket man of North Korea, and other dictators around the world, the Che Guevara t-shirt wearing young Americans have made their way into West Point and Main Street USA, protesting as paid mobs of racist BLM anarchists, fascist ANTI-FA anarchists, and other seasoned communist agitators.

Newspapers of note and the main stream media continue to rehabilitate communism and paint it in a positive light, spinning its non-existent egalitarian and social justice qualities, while hiding communism’s death toll of 100 million people.


Communism Never Died, It Was Cleverly Repackaged for the Historically Impaired and Useful Idiots

Sep 22, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

“For us in Russia, communism is a dead dog. For many people in the West, it is still a living lion.” — Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

In 1950 Congress passed the Internal Security Act and, four years later, the Communist Control Act. It condemned communism and the Communist Party of the United States. Today a sizeable portion of Congress actually belongs to the Communist Party U.S.A. or is sympathetic to it. In a recent poll, 40 percent of Americans prefer communism to capitalism.

In 1954 Congress delineated penalties for anyone belonging to a party or a group calling for the violent overthrow of the United States. Just being a member, however, was not enough reason for arrest or penalty.  Today members of Congress, public citizens, and illegals call for the overthrow of our government without any penalties.


Empires End in the Dustbin of History

Sep 16, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

Empires come and go. The twilight of western civilization is not just a poetic idea, it is a painful reality. Liberals often say that they do not like to make broadly pessimistic pronouncements about the collective fate of civilization.  Of course not, it might upset their blind followers who dwell in the haze of marijuana, hard-core drugs, immorality, decadence, and debauchery.

Anarchists are allowed to burn down towns, while police are told to stand down. ANTI-FA and BLM, fascist and racist organizations by any description, deface statues they don’t like and beat up others whose ideas they disagree with, proclaiming that they have a right to attack them for their opinions.


Mississippians Are Resilient People

Sep 14, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

As a resident of Mississippi for thirty years, I learned that living in the tornado alley close to Tupelo meant that downpours, high winds, and spun-seemingly-out-of-nowhere tornadoes were a weekly occurrence during hurricane season.

The first tornado I experienced took down part of the only mall in Tupelo and caused severe damage in its vicinity. The hit sometimes looked like a surgical strike and other times it downed an entire patch of forest on Natchez Trace, skipping and jumping to other locations for miles. We had straight line winds that often caused more damage than some tornadoes did.


Toilet Paper with Wood Chips

Sep 5, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

Huffing and puffing, I lug the large package of toilet paper from our local Costco into the house. It’s not that the price is better; I just don’t want to go to the store more often than I have to. I stood in lines enough during my twenty years of living under the boot of communism.

I am always tempted to ask the cashier if that’s enough toilet paper for the average food intake. I never do it because the cashiers are all foreign, barely speak English, and my meek attempt at potty humor would be met by strange stares.


Bolshevik-Style Cultural Purge

Aug 28, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

“If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?”—Mad Hatter, character in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

If you wondered about the deplorable state of American mis-education, all you have to do is look at the historical revisionist indoctrination in the textbooks, the classroom-forced Islamization of students, the Common Core standards that are dumbing down students across the board, and the Bolshevik-style cultural purge of Civil War monuments and heroes that are taking place around the country with the full approval and instigation from academia, the MSM, politicians, the current administration, and American citizens.


The Technology of Yesteryear

Aug 20, 2017 — Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh

The world around us is changing vertiginously. It’s not that I am getting older and my perspective has slowed down; technology and the way we live are being fundamentally transformed under our own eyes, but we are too busy to notice.

We seldom ponder how far and how fast technology has forever altered our lives and who we are as people because of it. We have become the automatons we’ve been warned about decades ago when we thought it was just science fiction designed to entertain us. But here we are.

In my six decades on earth, my life went from riding a rickety, smoke-spewing Diesel bus with holes in the floorboard, a bus that took one hour to transport us six miles to grandma’s house, a wagon full of grain or hay pulled by oxen which took me and grandpa to the corn and wheat grinding mill, a pink Pegasus bicycle with a white banana-shaped seat and a basket, and a soot-smelling train that stopped in every little village and took all day to go 100 miles, to fast-speed trains, supersonic airplanes, fast boats, trucks, SUVs, eighteen-wheelers, and fast cars.