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Old Health and Medicine Articles from 2007 and Before

Ovarian Cancer, the One That Whispers

Ovarian Cancer, the One That Whispers
What couldn’t I believe? Discovering that it’s been 42 years since I last wrote about ovarian cancer! During my time as a surgeon, what was my primary concern about this malignancy? And what has happened in the last four decades to bring hope to those diagnosed with this disease?

Ovarian cancer is the third most common malignancy of the female pelvic organs, after uterine and cervical cancer. But it is also the most fatal pelvic malignancy.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, November 19, 2018 - Full Story

Israeli scientists develop implanted organs that won’t be rejected

Israeli scientists develop implanted organs that won’t be rejected
Israeli researchers report that they have invented the first fully personalized tissue implant, engineered from a patient’s own materials and cells. The new technology makes it possible to engineer any kind of tissue implant, for the spinal cord, to the heart, or brain, from one small fatty tissue biopsy.

“We were able to create a personalized hydrogel from the materials of the biopsy, to differentiate fatty tissue cells into different cell types and to engineer cardiac, spinal cord, cortical and other tissue implants to treat different diseases,” said lead researcher Prof. Tal Dvir of Tel Aviv University’s Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Sagol Center for Regenerative Biotechnology.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - Full Story

3D bioprinted lungs to be available for global transplants

3D bioprinted lungs to be available for global transplantsCollPlant, an Israeli regenerative medicine company focused on 3D bioprinting of tissues and organs, signed a license, development and commercialization agreement with United Therapeutics Corporation of Maryland for 3D bioprinted lung transplants.

The agreement combines CollPlant’s proprietary recombinant human collagen (rhCollagen) derived from engineered tobacco plants, and its BioInk technology, with the regenerative medicine and organ manufacturing capabilities of United Therapeutics subsidiary Lung Biotechnology PBC.

By ISRAEL21c - Sunday, November 11, 2018 - Full Story

Unconventional Medicine to Treat Chronic Disease

Unconventional Medicine to Treat Chronic Disease
I wrote years ago that, “If you keep going to hell, you’ll eventually get there.” Today, half of North Americans suffer from chronic disease. One in four has several chronic diseases, and 30 percent of children struggle with chronic illness. Chris Kresser, an integrative medicine clinician at The California Center for Functional Medicine, and author of the book, “Unconventional Medicine,” reports that conventional medicine has failed those suffering from chronic disease. So how can we prevent so many from finding their way to hell?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, November 5, 2018 - Full Story

Understanding endometriosis

Understanding endometriosis
About 10 percent of women worldwide suffer from endometriosis, a painful and debilitating disease with inadequate treatments. Currently, doctors don’t know what causes the condition, which occurs when endometrial tissue escapes the uterus and forms lesions on other organs. But scientists are working hard to better understand the disease and develop new diagnostic tests and medicines, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, November 3, 2018 - Full Story

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar
Autumn is the season for falling leaves, pumpkin-spice-flavored everything and apple cider. Yet new research indicates that, in addition to alcohol, some hard ciders may contain a hefty dose of added sugar, which may not be disclosed on the label. The researchers report their results in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, November 3, 2018 - Full Story

Ultrasound breakthrough allows doctors to examine patients remotely

Ultrasound breakthrough allows doctors to examine patients remotely
The idea of ultrasound technology is to give radiologists a dynamic look at moving parts inside the body. However, most ultrasound scans today are done by technicians – so the radiologist is reviewing recorded images or video clips instead of seeing the full real-time picture.

As a result, the doctor may miss something important or send the patient for a repeat ultrasound or a more costly and invasive diagnostic imaging.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - Full Story

Can Stem Cell Injections Replace Hip and Knee Surgery?

Can Stem Cell Injections Replace Hip and Knee Surgery?

What should you do if the doctor says, “You need a hip or knee replacement due to severe arthritis? The time – honoured treatment has been a major operation to replace the injured joint. This may still be the best option for some patients. But how many of these joints could be repaired by stem cell injections, thereby saving the potential complications of surgery?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 29, 2018 - Full Story

New clinical protocol after general surgery cuts opioid prescribing in half

New clinical protocol after general surgery cuts opioid prescribing in half,
In recent years deaths from opioid overdoses have become one of the most common injury-related deaths in North America. The continent also has the highest per capita rate of opioid prescription in the world.

Recognizing the role that opioid prescribing plays in the national opioid crisis, a team of researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University have developed a new clinical protocol called STOP Narcotics. A study demonstrating the efficacy of their protocol is being presented at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress in Boston, Massachusetts on October 24.

By News on the Net - Thursday, October 25, 2018 - Full Story

What You May Not Know About Vaccines

What You May Not Know About Vaccines
Every year readers ask me if I get flu shots. I reply, I don’t. I rely on high daily doses of vitamin C to build up my immune system. But I may be wrong. So, I’ve sought the opinion of experts in the field. Their primary message is that informed consent is vital.

Most people believe vaccines would not be advised unless researchers and doctors deemed them safe. But I’ve often stressed, there’s no such thing as 100 percent safe surgery. The same is true of vaccines. That’s why 3.6 billion dollars has been awarded to families due to the complications of vaccines.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 22, 2018 - Full Story

Catholic Medical Association Speaks Out Against Fellow Medical Organization’s Decision to Take a “Ne

Medical Organization's Decision to Take a Neutral Stance on Physician-Assisted Suicide
PHILADELPHIA, PA—The Catholic Medical Association (CMA) today expressed deep disappointment and concern over the American Academy of Family Physicians’ (AAFP) decision to officially take a “neutral stance” on physician-assisted suicide. The move marks a shift in the American medical communities overall long and deeply held opposition to PAS.

“It is quite startling that the AAFP would be so diametrically opposed to the medical communities historical and long-standing opposition against physician-assisted suicide. It is in direct violation of the “do no harm” Hippocratic Oath. We at the CMA are dedicated to preserving life from conception (not birth) to natural death and will continue to remain staunchly opposed to any form of assisted suicide. It goes against natural law,” said CMA President Peter T. Morrow, MD.

By Catholic Medical Association - Thursday, October 18, 2018 - Full Story

Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney

Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney
There just aren’t enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kidney with the potential to make dialysis more convenient, comfortable and effective.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - Full Story

A Healthy Lifestyle Adds 12 to 14 Years of Life

A Healthy Lifestyle Adds 12 to 14 Years of Life
What results in good health and longevity? I’ve said for years that it’s good genes, good lifestyle and good luck. But since we can’t choose our parents, or know what fate holds in store for us, we must treat lifestyle with tender, loving care.  Now, a report in the publication, Circulation, proves that a sound lifestyle adds 12 to 14 more years to life.

Two epidemiological studies of health professionals involved 120,000 men and women. This group was followed for 34 years. The study concluded that for people over 50 who had never smoked, exercised daily, had good dietary habits, a moderate use of alcohol, and maintained a healthy weight, ended up the winners.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 15, 2018 - Full Story

Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments

Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments
For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It’s hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now in a study appearing in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are released. This visual indicator could help eye doctors and patients readily determine whether these medications are where they should be.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, October 12, 2018 - Full Story

Natural Remedies and Illogical Attacks

Natural Remedies and Illogical Attacks
Break a law and you end up in jail. “Ignorance of the law is no excuse” it’s said. So should ignorance of medical facts excuse anyone? Time and time again so-called medical experts publish illogical reports without repercussion. Recently, a physician stated publicly, “There is no case for vitamin supplementation in normal, healthy, non-pregnant adults who are receiving the recommended daily intake of nutrients”. But is this medical fact or fiction?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Thursday, October 11, 2018 - Full Story


A better system for monitoring unstable blood pressure

A better system for monitoring unstable blood pressure
VitalMiner, a new software system to measure hemodynamic instability – unstable blood pressure – in intensive-care patients is hailed as a potential lifesaver by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, where it is being piloted.

“Earlier prediction of physiological deterioration of patients by using ‘smart’ monitoring software and machine learning algorithms will save lives and enable better informed resuscitation of the critically ill and injured,” said Cincinnati Children’s Hospital’s Prof. Victor F. Garcia, founding director of the hospital’s trauma services and a professor of surgery and pediatrics.

By ISRAEL21c - Sunday, October 7, 2018 - Full Story

Artificial sweeteners are poisoning your gut

Artificial sweeteners are poisoning your gut
FDA-approved artificial sweeteners and sport supplements are toxic to digestive gut microbes, according to a new paper published in the journal Molecules by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) in Israel and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.


The collaborative study indicated relative toxicity of six artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, saccharine, neotame, advantame, and acesulfame potassium-k) and 10 sport supplements containing these artificial sweeteners. The bacteria in the digestive system became toxic when exposed to concentrations of only one milligram per milliliter of these substances.

By ISRAEL21c - Sunday, October 7, 2018 - Full Story

Contact lenses for the nose that may help you lose weight

Contact lenses for the nose that may help you lose weight
Some years ago, Adva Beck experienced an “aha” moment when she bit into her favorite fruit, a peach, and quickly discarded it because her stuffy nose prevented her from tasting it properly.

She didn’t have any background in biology or medicine but the phenomenon intrigued her and she started to study scientific literature about how smell affects appetite and weight.

By ISRAEL21c - Sunday, October 7, 2018 - Full Story

Gallstones: For Surgery or the Crematorium?

Gallstones: For Surgery or the Crematorium?
What should you do if you are diagnosed with gallstones? Today, 10 percent of North Americans share this medical problem. For some patients surgery is the prudent choice. But now, a report from the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA), shows that, in some cases, leaving gallstones to the crematorium can prevent serious complications and even death.

In 1991 Dr. Joacques Perissat at the University of Bordeau, in France, removed a gallbladder by laparoscopic (keyhole) surgery. This innovation provided a huge advantage for patients from a technical standpoint. But is it foolproof?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 1, 2018 - Full Story