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Old Health and Medicine Articles from 2007 and Before

How baby aspirin saves lives (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON—Low-dose “baby” aspirin is rarely given to children anymore. Instead, people at risk of a heart attack may take a daily aspirin to decrease their risk. In this video, Reactions explains how low-dose aspirin works to inhibit blood clotting and help prevent heart attacks:



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, January 3, 2019 - Full Story

How does a helpful substance like cholesterol turn deadly?

How does a helpful substance like cholesterol turn deadly?
You probably know that LDL cholesterol is “bad” and that too much of it in your blood puts you at risk of atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries.

A group of Israeli researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science wanted to understand how cholesterol, a basic component of life, can turn deadly.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, January 2, 2019 - Full Story

E-bandage generates electricity, speeds wound healing in rats

E-bandage generates electricity, speeds wound healing in rats
Skin has a remarkable ability to heal itself. But in some cases, wounds heal very slowly or not at all, putting a person at risk for chronic pain, infection and scarring. Now, researchers have developed a self-powered bandage that generates an electric field over an injury, dramatically reducing the healing time for skin wounds in rats. They report their results in ACS Nano.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, January 2, 2019 - Full Story

Are You Taking These Medicines Too Long?

Are You Taking These Medicines Too Long?
What will be your 2019 New Year’s resolution? Losing weight? Finally deciding to get off the couch and get more exercise? Hopefully to convince yourself smoking means 20 years less life? These are all healthy ways to start the year. But I’d like to add another New Year’s Resolution. Many North Americans are taking medicines for the long run when they’re only intended for the short run. This can have a huge impact on well-being.

The January Reports on Health claims that one-third of Americans over the age of 55 take too many medications. Michael Steinman, an expert on aging and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, says, “Some medicine are more effective and safest when you use them for a specific and limited period of time.” So what are some of the major drugs being taken too long, and what can happen when they are?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Tuesday, January 1, 2019 - Full Story

What Did You Learn in 2018?

What Did You Learn in 2018?
How much have you been paying attention in 2018? I hope that during that time you’ve learned to live a better lifestyle, and to circumvent medical hazards that will enable you to live longer. So let’s see how well you do on this test.

1. Heroin is available for addicts at injection sites in Canada. But it is not available at hospitals for terminal cancer patients in pain.

2. NEO40 is a natural remedy that increases the production of nitric oxide by the inner lining of arteries. This dilates arteries decreasing blood pressure and risk of heart attack and stroke.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, December 24, 2018 - Full Story

Treating obesity without going under the knife

Treating obesity without going under the knife

More than one in 10 people around the world are classified as obese, defined as having a BMI (body-mass index) of 30 or higher. In the United States, that number jumps dramatically to one out of every three American adults.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - Full Story

How heat and salt may contribute to multiple sclerosis

How heat and salt may contribute to multiple sclerosis

Worldwide, about 3 million people are afflicted by multiple sclerosis (MS), an incurable autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the fatty membrane (myelin sheath) that insulates the long extensions of nerve cells.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - Full Story

Israeli research makes breakthrough in battle against viruses

Israeli research makes breakthrough in battle against virusesViruses are often able to “highjack” our immune system, allowing them to pass through undetected and cause harm. But a recent study just got the better of them, opening up new ways to battle virus attacks.


Many viruses contain RNA genetic material in the form of a double helix. The immune system can identify these double-stranded RNA fragments as a viral pathogen that must be fought.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, December 19, 2018 - Full Story

Rx: For Christmas Make a Telephone Call

What’s the most important gift you could give this holiday season? The Greek philosopher, Plato, once remarked, “Whoever likes being alone must be either a beast or a God”. I’d say Amen to that statement. Crisis workers tell us that at this time of the year, depression and suicide risk is highest. So what can we all do to decrease holiday melancholy?

I’ve never seen it in the index of disease in medical texts, but loneliness should be listed in big print. It’s an illness that sooner or later disrupts the lives of   many people. Chopin, the great pianist and composer, must have been deeply depressed. He complained of being, “alone, alone, alone”.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, December 17, 2018 - Full Story

Low Intensity Laser Therapy For Bruised Brains

How far have we come since Egyptians drilled holes in the skull in an attempt to cure a variety of diseases? We’ve seen tremendous advances in brain surgery. But relatively little progress in how to treat concussion. Basically, medical advice has been to rest while waiting for the brain to recover. But research now shows Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) can dramatically speed up the healing of bruised brains. So why isn’t it used more by doctors, and for more conditions?

To learn about this therapy I interviewed Dr. Fred Kahn, founder of Meditech International. Last year his Toronto clinic treated over 800 concussion patients, those who have been in a car accident, suffered a fall, or who years ago   had a blow to the head. Some had not lost consciousness, so failed to realize they’d suffered a concussion.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, December 10, 2018 - Full Story

A banner year for pharma


As 2018 draws to a close, the pharmaceutical industry is celebrating a prosperous year of new investments and therapeutic breakthroughs. These successes were driven by cutting-edge science and progress in finally translating long-standing technology into actual products, according to a cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, December 7, 2018 - Full Story

Migraine relief from an Israeli neuro-modulation device

Migraine relief from an Israeli neuro-modulation device
Neurolief’s device under development for banishing severe headache pain. Photo: courtesy

Fourteen percent of American adults suffer from migraines or severe headaches. Among women aged 18 to 44, the number soars to 23%. There is no cure for migraines, and over-the-counter pain relief medicines do not always work.

By ISRAEL21c - Thursday, December 6, 2018 - Full Story

Remedies to Prevent Death from AAA

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
Ask anyone about AAA and they will immediately think of the American Automobile Association. But in this case it stands for abdominal aortic aneurysm.  Sir William Osler once remarked, “There is no disease more conducive to clinical humility than aneurysm of the aorta.” He could have added that it’s a lethal disease, so prevention is better than cure.         

Every year over 20,000 North Americans die from a ruptured aorta. Albert Einstein, the physicist who expounded the Theory of Relativity, and Lucille Ball, the TV star that made us laugh, both died of AAA.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, December 3, 2018 - Full Story

Medical Research Issues and Peer-Review

Medical Research Issues and Peer-Review
John Ioannidis reported in 2005 that most published medical research findings are false. 1 His statistical analysis and logic are impeccable and his paper has never been seriously refuted. Furthermore, he has had a tremendous impact: the paper has been viewed more than 2.5 million times.

In 2009, Dr. Marcia Angell, former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, wrote that, “It is simply no longer possible to believe much of the clinical research that is published, or to rely on the judgment of trusted physicians or authoritative medical guidelines. I take no pleasure in this conclusion, which I reached slowly and reluctantly over my two decades as an editor.” 2

By Jack Dini - Saturday, December 1, 2018 - Full Story

Sharing benefits of digitized DNA

Sharing benefits of digitized DNA
Today, scientists can sift through quadrillions of genetic sequences in open-access databases, searching (free-of-charge) for new ways to engineer crops, develop medicines or even create synthetic organisms. But a controversial proposal that aims to share the benefits of digitized DNA could affect scientists’ ability to use these data, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, November 30, 2018 - Full Story

On-demand biologics

Making biologics on demand
Many life-saving medicines, including insulin, antibodies and vaccines, are derived from living cells. These “biologics” can be difficult to obtain and store on the battlefield or in remote areas. That’s why scientists are trying to develop portable systems that can quickly manufacture small batches of protein therapeutics on demand, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - Full Story

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells
Pancreatic cancer cells are known for their ability to thrive under extreme conditions of low nutrients and oxygen, a trait known in the cancer field as “austerity.” The cells’ remarkable resistance to starvation is one reason why pancreatic cancer is so deadly. Now researchers have identified a compound from a Congolese plant that has strong “antiausterity” potential, making pancreatic cancer cells susceptible to nutrient starvation. They report their results in ACS’ Journal of Natural Products.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - Full Story

How exercise could help fight drug addiction

How exercise could help fight drug addiction
The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user’s resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brain, according to a study in the journal ACS Omega.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - Full Story

Israelis discover promising treatment for aggressive brain tumors

Hebrew University PhD student Maxim Mogilevsky and Prof. Rotem Karni in the Institute for Medical Research-Israel Canada lab. Photo by Polina Denichenko courtesy of Hebrew University
A new treatment for aggressive brain tumors (glioblastoma) shows great promise, according to a report by Israeli scientists that was published recently in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.

Glioblastoma is a serious and incurable brain cancer. Patients receiving this diagnosis typically have 11 to 20 months to live. One of the main difficulties in treating this cancer is that its cells quickly build up a resistance to chemotherapy.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - Full Story

What Can a Psychiatrist Tell Us About Vitamin D?

What Can a Psychiatrist Tell Us About Vitamin D?
Winter’s coming, so how much vitamin D do we need? How much time do you have to spend in the sunlight to obtain adequate amounts? How does obesity affect the dosage? How many diseases can be prevented by adequate amounts of this vitamin? And what can a psychiatrist tell us about this vital vitamin?

Years ago I reported that Dr. Catharine Gordon, a professor of pediatrics at The Harvard Medical School, tested the vitamin D levels of teenagers 11 to 18 years of age. She found that 14 percent of these adolescents were deficient in vitamin D. Today about 30 percent of adults are low in D.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, November 26, 2018 - Full Story

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