Global Warming-Energy-Environment

WhatFinger

Wringing water from the air

Wringing water from the air
Scientists estimate that half a billion people in the world lack sufficient water to meet their daily needs, and that number is only expected to rise with the ever-growing population and a changing climate.  Therefore, researchers are working on technologies to soak up water from an abundant resource — the air. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, describes several promising approaches.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - Full Story

Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time

Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time
Moss, one of the world’s oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it. Now in a study appearing in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report that they have found a simple and inexpensive way to detect air pollutants, specifically sulfur dioxide, in real time based on subtle changes in moss leaves. The discovery could rapidly alert authorities to potentially dangerous alterations in air quality using a sustainable, natural plant sensor.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - Full Story

The IPCC’s latest climate hysteria

UN issues yet another climate tipping point – Humans given only 12 more years
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report 15 claims the latest disaster “tipping point” is just 12 years away. If governments around the world fail to make “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society,” human civilization and our planet face cataclysm, the IPCC asserts.

By Paul Driessen - Sunday, October 14, 2018 - Full Story

Wind Power: Negative Effect on Global Warming in the Short Term

Wind Power: Negative Effect on Global Warming in the Short Term
Wind power has expanded 35-fold since 2000 and now provides 8% of the nation’s electricity. The US Department of Energy expects wind turbine capacity to more than quadruple again by 2050. 1

By Jack Dini - Saturday, October 13, 2018 - Full Story

Tiny tools for a big industry

Seeking to boost oil production, petroleum researchers turn to nanotech
Even with technological advances in recent years, the petroleum industry still struggles to squeeze as much oil and gas as possible out of underground reservoirs. Now the big industry is looking to nanotechnology to boost efficiency. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the tiny particles could help pinpoint oil pockets, monitor underground conditions and extract more trapped oil.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, October 12, 2018 - Full Story

The “Carbon Capture Syndrome” (CCS)

The Carbon Capture Syndrome
Most commonly these days, the CCS acronym stands for: “Carbon Capture and Storage”—as you can surmise from the title above, I have a slightly different interpretation of “CCS.”

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Thursday, October 11, 2018 - Full Story

More misplaced environmentalist outrage

More misplaced environmentalist outrage
How we long for the good old days! That’s the tone of some environmental industry leaders who are screaming bloody murder (literally, not figuratively) about Department of the Interior actions under President Trump. The Department’s re-interpretation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act is a case in point.

By Greg Walcher - Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - Full Story

China’s Coal Escapades

China's Coal Escapades
China burns more coal than the rest of the world combined. The dirty fossil fuel has powered the country’s rapid expansion over recent decades, the main reason China is the world’s largest polluter ahead of the United States. This is a problem China wants to fix and it’s retiring the worst sources of pollution while bringing great gobs of cleaner power online. The country has pledged to begin reducing its rising greenhouse gas emissions no late than 2030.  1

By Jack Dini - Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - Full Story

Can Poor Families Sue John Kerry for Climate Policy Deaths?

Can Poor Families Sue John Kerry for Climate Policy Deaths?
It’s not enough that the Climate Crisis-Renewable Energy Cabal (CC-REC) now rails that an average global temperature increase of just 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels would bring “catastrophic risks” of “climate mayhem” to people and planet.

By Paul Driessen - Monday, October 8, 2018 - Full Story

Wind Gives Way to Solar Power and Natural Gas After Federal Subsidies End

Wind Gives Way to Solar Power and Natural Gas After Federal Subsidies End
Wind’s federal subsidy, the production tax credit, is currently set to be phased out by 2020, at which point wind power will likely give way to solar and natural gas plant additions, which will replace retiring generating plants, mostly coal and nuclear, and satisfy slowly increasing electricity demand, according to EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook. The Energy Information Administration projects that wind additions between 2025 and 2040 will be a paltry 1.2 gigawatts, while solar power additions are expected to total 170 gigawatts and natural gas additions are expected to total 78 gigawatts. The investment tax credit for solar power phases down to a permanent 10 percent for commercial and utility investment in 2022 from 30 percent today.

By Institute for Energy Research - Thursday, October 4, 2018 - Full Story

Fiddling With Temperature Data

Fiddling With Temperature Data
The problem with the NOAA data is that it is fake data. NOAA creates the warming trend by altering the data.

By Jack Dini - Wednesday, October 3, 2018 - Full Story

California’s 100-Percent Zero-Emission Power Goal

California's 100-Percent Zero-Emission Power Goal
California lawmakers have set a goal of relying entirely upon zero-emission energy sources for the state’s electricity by 2045. The bill requires that 50 percent of California’s electricity be supplied by renewable resources by 2025 and 60 percent by 2030, and 100 percent “zero-carbon” electricity by 2045, which can include nuclear power.

By Institute for Energy Research - Tuesday, October 2, 2018 - Full Story

Big Green Carpetbagging: Environmental Foundations’ Out-of-State Spending

Big Green Carpetbagging: Environmental Foundations' Out-of-State Spending
The fact that the shale revolution has saved Americans $74 billion per year and has made the U.S. the top oil producer in the world is, to put it mildly, a big deal.

By Institute for Energy Research - Tuesday, October 2, 2018 - Full Story

Rooting out scientific corruption

Rooting out scientific corruption
Dr. Brian Wansink recently resigned from his position as Columbia University professor, eating behavior researcher and director of the Cornell “food lab.” A faculty investigation found that he had misreported research data, failed to preserve data and results properly, and employed dubious statistical techniques.

By Paul Driessen - Monday, October 1, 2018 - Full Story

Questioning Climate Hysteria

Kenneth Richard and Pierre Gosselin have been compiling lists which question climate hysteria.

Questioning Climate Hysteria
In just the first 6 months of 2018,  254 scientific papers were published that cast doubt on the position that anthropogenic CO2 emissions function as the climate’s fundamental control knob, or that otherwise serve to question the efficacy of climate models or the related ‘consensus’ position commonly endorsed by policymakers and mainstream media sources.

By Jack Dini - Saturday, September 29, 2018 - Full Story

Ethanol in gasoline is a boon for farmers, but rips-off American consumers

Ethanol in gasoline is a boon for farmers, but rips-off American consumers
WASHINGTON, D.C — U.S. oil and natural gas producers are shattering records — recently overtaking Saudi Arabia and Russia to lead the world in crude oil production.

By Frank J Macchiarola - Friday, September 28, 2018 - Full Story

We must all sacrifice for the environment

San francisco, water, environmentalists
Have we become a society of people who want to regulate others, but not ourselves? We laugh at those who suddenly object to a policy that seemed perfectly OK when (they thought) it only applied to others.

By Greg Walcher - Thursday, September 27, 2018 - Full Story

$100 Oil Is A Distinct Possibility

$100 Oil Is A Distinct Possibility
An oil price spike is starting to look increasingly possible, with a rerun of 2008 not entirely out of the question, according to a new report.

The outages from Iran are worse than most analysts expected, and bottlenecks in the U.S. shale patch could prevent non-OPEC supply from plugging the gap. To top it off, new regulations from the International Maritime Organization set to take effect in 2020 could significantly tighten supplies.

By Oilprice.com -- Nick Cunningham- Thursday, September 27, 2018 - Full Story

Australia Shows Futility of Climate Legislation

Australia Shows Futility of Climate Legislation
An article last month in the New York Times showcases the futility of climate legislation, regardless of one’s views on the desirability of government measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Specifically, Somini Sengupta’s piece explained that the Australian government was toppled because of climate policy, and then drew parallels to the United States and Canada. Whether it was her intention, Sengupta demonstrated that if indeed climate change is a problem, activists should realize that the political process offers a very unreliable “solution.”

By Institute for Energy Research - Thursday, September 27, 2018 - Full Story

Is the Environmental Left Really ‘David’ Fighting Goliath?

Is the Environmental Left Really 'David' Fighting Goliath?
In the narrative crafted by environmental groups, the fossil fuel industry is depicted as a greedy, politically connected, and downright evil conspirator working to undermine the democratic will. It has been compared to the mid-century tobacco industry as a disseminator of misinformation about the harm of its products to keep people “addicted” to them. To fight this evil Goliath there has emerged a ‘David’—a scrappy, rag tag team of environmental groups and renewable energy companies, whose weapons of “truth” and science must overcome the larger might of money and power wielded by their opposition. But this self-serving narrative is false.

By Institute for Energy Research - Monday, September 24, 2018 - Full Story