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EPA Chief Puts Science Back Into Environmental Protection

EPA Chief Puts Science Back Into Environmental Protection

Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt may be just a lawyer, but so far he has done more to bring sound science to the EPA than any scientist ever affiliated with the agency.

By Steve Milloy - Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - Full Story

Limiting California’s Waiver Authority Is Not a Federalism Issue

Limiting California’s Waiver Authority Is Not a Federalism Issue
The federal government has passed two main laws regulating the efficiency and emissions of motor vehicles nationwide. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, created by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) in 1975 in reaction to the Arab fuel embargo, mandate higher fuel efficiency for vehicles in an effort to reduce U.S. reliance on foreign oil.

By Institute for Energy Research - Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - Full Story

Natural Gas Plants Under Attack in Several States

Natural Gas Plants Under Attack in Several States
California, Arizona, Michigan, and Massachusetts are saying “no” to new natural gas generating plants, and California even wants to get rid of some of its older gas plants. Recently, the California Public Utilities Commission directed Pacific Gas and Electric, the state’s largest electric utility, to solicit bids for renewable energy and storage projects to replace three natural gas plants.

By Institute for Energy Research - Tuesday, March 27, 2018 - Full Story

Adélie and Emperor Penguins Doing Fine In New Locations

Adélie and Emperor Penguins Doing Fine In New LocationsBiologists studying animal life on Antarctica believed that a particular species of penguin was in peril, undergoing precipitous population decline since the 1970s. However, new findings show a massive discovery of the black-and-white seabirds—mainly because researchers missed looking on one group of islands on the tip of the continental peninsula. 1

By Jack Dini - Sunday, March 25, 2018 - Full Story

Gasoline—not corn alcohol—belongs in our fuel tanks!

Gasoline—not corn alcohol—belongs in our fuel tanks!
DALLAS, Texas—President Trump frequently boasts of his success in rolling back costly and harmful regulations.  Let’s hope that effort includes the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

The RFS is the latest phase in Congress’s decades-long support for the ethanol industry.  The problem is that support has outlived its usefulness.

By Merrill Matthews - Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - Full Story

No, China Will Not Outsmart America’s Energy Renaissance

No, China Will Not Outsmart America’s Energy Renaissance
Imagine a centrally planned economy out-thinking and out-performing a consumer-driven, free-market one.

That is the prognostication, even hope, of Amy Myers Jaffe, director of the program on Energy and Climate Change at the Council on Foreign Relations, as stated in the current edition of Foreign Affairs (“Green Giant: Renewable Energy and Chinese Power”) and in the Houston Chronicle (“Will Clean Energy Push China Past the U.S”).

By Institute for Energy Research - Saturday, March 17, 2018 - Full Story

Specious arguments fuel climate lawsuits to kill autonomy

Specious arguments fuel climate lawsuits to kill autonomy
When you can’t win the argument on the merits of facts, you do the next best thing – sue.

It’s nothing new to see environmental groups lawyer up to protect fish spawning, insect habitat or weed propagation.

By A. Dru Kristenev - Friday, March 16, 2018 - Full Story

The Gas Tax Has Little to Do With Road Costs

The Gas Tax Has Little to Do With Road Costs
In a previous article, I explained that the federal gasoline tax was a very crude way to fund highways, because there is only a tenuous link between gasoline consumption and highway usage.

By Institute for Energy Research - Friday, March 16, 2018 - Full Story

White House Looks Into Permanent Jones Act Waiver for Puerto Rico

White House Looks Into Permanent Jones Act Waiver for Puerto Rico
According to several reports, the Trump White House is pursuing a permanent waiver to the Jones Act for Puerto Rico. This decision comes after the law received heavy criticism during last year’s hurricane season when it was blamed for impeding emergency efforts in Puerto Rico during the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. In response to this criticism, on September 28, the Trump administration issued a 10-day Jones Act waiver for Puerto Rico to help support the emergency relief effort.

By Institute for Energy Research - Friday, March 16, 2018 - Full Story

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Pollution

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and Pollution
Many folks worldwide live in constant fear of chemicals. High up on the list are volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as hydrocarbons, which vaporize easily. VOCs come from gasoline combustion and from evaporation of liquid fuels, solvents, and organic chemicals such as those in some paints, cleaners, nail polish remover, soaps, pesticides, and even we humans.

By Jack Dini - Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - Full Story

United States to Be the World’s Largest Producer of Oil by 2023

United States to Be the World’s Largest Producer of Oil by 2023
According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), when accounting for most of the global growth in petroleum supplies, the United States is expected to overtake Russia to become the world’s largest oil producer by 2023.

By Institute for Energy Research - Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - Full Story

Taming biofuel-loving microbes

Taming biofuel-loving microbes
Most people are cautious around gasoline and diesel for good reason, but some microbes love the stuff — especially biofuels that contain fatty acid derivatives.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, March 12, 2018 - Full Story

Raw Drinks and Food

Raw Drinks and Food
There are many reasons why some people think about drinking raw milk, which is milk that has not been pasteurized to kill harmful germs. Some people want to eat less processed food. Others have heard that raw milk contains more of certain nutrients than pasteurized milk, or that it can prevent or even solve various health problems. Still others think buying raw milk is one way to support local farmers and sustainable agriculture. 1

By Jack Dini - Thursday, March 8, 2018 - Full Story

The D.C. Carbon Tax Comedy of Errors

The D.C. Carbon Tax Comedy of Errors
Washington City Paper’s February 8 article discussing the ongoing carbon tax initiative in the District of Columbia—A Carbon Tax Is Popular, But District Lawmakers Can’t Decide How To Implement It—reads like a comedy of errors.

By Institute for Energy Research - Thursday, March 8, 2018 - Full Story

Those fraudulent climate litigation shakedowns

Those fraudulent climate litigation shakedowns
The ultra liberal enclaves of New York City and San Francisco, Oakland, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, Marin, and Imperial Beach, California all claim to be deeply worried about manmade climate cataclysms. They detest petroleum, oppose pipelines, fracking and onshore and offshore drilling, and strongly support renewable energy and expensive electricity: already 17-18¢ a kilowatt-hour for families, rich and poor.

By Paul Driessen - Thursday, March 8, 2018 - Full Story

Tomorrow’s Grim, Global, Green Dictatorship

Tomorrow’s Grim, Global, Green Dictatorship
Greens hate individual freedom and private property. They dream of a centralised unelected global government, financed by taxes on developed nations and controlled by all the tentacles of the UN.

No longer is real pollution of our environment the main Green concern. The key slogan of the Green religion is “sustainable development”, with them defining what is sustainable.

By Viv Forbes - Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - Full Story

Pot and—Tarantulas?

Pot and--Tarantulas?
Canada exports a variety of goods to the world market. A good chunk of that is semi-processed materials like metal ores, zinc ingots, coils of rolled steel, sheets of aluminum, lumber and plywood, crude oil and “syncrude” (a liquefied form of bitumen), natural gas, agricultural livestock and its products, grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables, processed products from the seafood industry, and so forth.

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - Full Story

Will Congress finally get tough on junk science?

Will Congress finally get tough on junk science?
A growing problem for modern industrialized Western societies is the legion of government agencies and unelected bureaucrats and allied nongovernmental organizations that seem impervious to transparency, accountability or reform. Their expansive power often controls public perceptions and public policies.

Prominent among them are those involved in climate change research and energy policy. In recent years, they have adjusted data to fit the dangerous manmade climate chaos narrative, while doling out billions of taxpayer dollars for research that supports this perspective, and basing dire predictions and policy demands primarily on climate models that assume carbon dioxide now drives climate and weather (and the sun, water vapor, ocean currents and other powerful natural forces have been relegated to minor roles).

By Paul Driessen - Monday, March 5, 2018 - Full Story

A genetic trigger adds branches to plants, could boost crop yields

A genetic trigger adds branches to plants, could boost crop yields
When it comes to agriculture from branched plants, such as apple trees, the more branches that bear fruit, the better. But in the real world, there’s a limit to the number of branches that plants make — a gene tends to put the brakes on this splitting process called shoot branching. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers reveal a chemical that can reverse this limitation, possibly leading to improved crop production.

By American Chemical Society - Sunday, March 4, 2018 - Full Story

Oil Market Fears: War, Default And Nuclear Weapons

Oil Market Fears: War, Default And Nuclear Weapons
The U.S. is one of the few areas of the world in which there is an energy investment boom underway, a development that could smooth out the uncertainties of geopolitical events around the world. At the same time, outside of the U.S., there is a deterioration of stability in many oil-producing regions, aggravating risks for both oil companies and the oil market, according to a new report.

By Oilprice.com -- Nick Cunningham- Friday, March 2, 2018 - Full Story