Health and Medicine

WhatFinger

A breath test for early-stage Parkinson’s

A breath test for early-stage Parkinson's
Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include tremor, loss of smell and neuropsychiatric problems. However, many people aren’t diagnosed until their disease is well-advanced, which could limit their treatment options. Now, researchers have tested a sensor to detect early-stage Parkinson’s disease from the breath of patients. They report their results in ACS Chemical Neuroscience.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, July 26, 2018

Smart probes pinpoint cancer cells for precise surgery

Smart probes pinpoint cancer cells for precise surgery
Many cancer patients die not from the primary malignant tumor, but rather the spread of lingering cancer cells to other parts of the body, known as metastasis. The so-called “smart probe” developed by a team of Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers may be able to help surgeons pinpoint cancer cells more precisely, allowing them to guarantee the removal of more cancer cells than ever before.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Long Term Family Doctor Decreases Chance of Death

Long Term Family Doctor Decreases Chance of Death
How important are new tests to diagnose and treat disease? Or improved surgical techniques, speedier emergency care and doctors specializing in various fields of medicine? The fact is that all improvements in medical care make life easier for patients and save lives. But a long overdue English report shows the family doctor (FD) also helps to prolong life.

Sir Denis Pereira Gray, former head of the Royal College of General Practitioners, spear-headed research that analyzed 22 different studies. His conclusion, published in the British Medical Journal, claims that a long-term FD who knows you inside and out decreases the risk of early death by up to 53 percent. So, in this era of heart transplantation, medical advances, and drug therapy, the FD remains the solid bedrock of patient care.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, July 23, 2018

Children and Grandchildren Headed for Liver transplants

nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)
Who hasn’t heard of the “Mayflower”, the ship that brought pilgrims to the U.S. in 1620? What is rarely known is that towards the end of that voyage, it was necessary to ration beer, and some pilgrims died as a result. In those days beer was safer to drink than water. It’s still a safe drink when used moderately, but excessive amounts can cause cirrhosis of the liver. And how many know that too much food can also cause nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in young people, and eventually require a liver transplant?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Thursday, July 19, 2018

A safe and effective way to whiten teeth

A safe and effective way to whiten teeth
In the age of Instagram and Snapchat, everyone wants to have perfect pearly whites. To get a brighter smile, consumers can opt for over the counter teeth-whitening treatments or a trip to the dentist to have their teeth bleached professionally. But both types of treatments can harm teeth. According to an article published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers have now developed a new, less destructive method.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, July 19, 2018

CRISPR’s growing pains

CRISPR gene editing
In the six years since its inception, CRISPR gene editing has experienced ups and downs, from giddy excitement over the technology’s potential to cure genetic diseases to patent disputes, ethical considerations and cancer scares. Despite recent setbacks, companies developing CRISPR therapies are forging ahead, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, July 14, 2018

Cleaning out pollen shells

As allergy season intensifies, many people are cursing pollen – the powdery substance released by plants for reproduction. However, pollen may serve a purpose beyond making new plants and triggering sneezes. In ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers report a new method for cleaning out the insides of pollen grains so that the non-allergenic shells can be used to carry medicines or vaccines into the human body. A video of the process is here.



By American Chemical Society - Friday, July 13, 2018

Doug Ford Is Dead Right, Injection Sites Dead Wrong

Doug Ford
Not all the lunatics are in the asylum. Why? Because federal prison officials are providing needles to prisoners so they can inject themselves with illegal drugs. Now, Doug Ford, Premier of Ontario, is being criticized for damning the use of injection sites in prison and in Canadian cities. Condoning drug use is the most illogical way to combat North America’s opioid epidemic. But what else would work?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, July 9, 2018

Why Did Anthony Bourdain Commit Suicide?

Why Did Anthony Bourdain Commit Suicide?
Albert Camus, the French humanist, wrote, “There is only one true philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy.” Pliny the Elder had said earlier, “Admit the miseries of our life on earth, suicide is God’s best gift to man.”

But what prompted Anthony Bourdain of TV’s “Parts Unknown” to hang himself? And could medical care have prevented it?

Suicide rates are rising in North America. For instance, among girls 10 to 19 the suicide rate has increased a shocking 70 percent.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, July 2, 2018

The Greatest Threat to Your Life

Blood clot, Thrombosis, that occurs in the heart, brain or legs
Ask anyone, “What’s the greatest medical risk of dying?” and they’ll answer “Heart attack.” The correct answer is a blood clot (Thrombosis) that occurs in the heart, brain or legs.  Now, a shocking report in the health publication, “LifeExtension”, shows what can happen to our legs when we’re flying at 35,000 feet. So with an aging population, and increased air travel, what can be done to decrease the risk of a blood clot?

Thrombosis can happen anytime and anywhere. But the greatest risk is a long air flight. This is when venous blood pools in the lower leg due to inactivity. But the extent of this threat has surprised researchers. Using ultrasound imaging they detected venous thrombosis in the lower legs in 5 to 7 percent of passengers, whose flights lasted 7 to 8 hours. But without symptoms, passengers were totally unaware of the presence of the thrombosis, or that it could kill them!

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Tuesday, June 26, 2018

“But Roosevelt Knows How To Be President!”

But Roosevelt Knows How To Be President!
72 years ago I arrived in Boston. I’d been accepted as a student at The Harvard Medical School. That night a full moon shone on the school’s white marble buildings, an awe-inspiring sight I’ve never forgotten.

I recently returned for a 68th reunion, attended lectures, and as a former student was interviewed by a film crew. At one point the interviewer asked, “What are your thoughts in this robotic age of medicine?”

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, June 18, 2018

Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfaces

Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfaces
Sharks are often the subject of TV specials or news stories focusing on their attacks on humans. But scientists are finding that sharks could inspire a new type of surface that would attack bacteria, helping humans instead of hurting them. As reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, researchers have designed a coating that is infused with antimicrobial agents and has the patterned diamond-like texture of shark skin.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Inexpensive detector is like ‘Velcro®’ for cancer cells

Inexpensive detector is like 'Velcro®' for cancer cells
Researchers have developed a new type of sensor that acts like Velcro® for prostate cancer cells, sticking them to a modified frosted glass slide, like those used in science classes, so that they can be identified from blood samples. The low-cost method, reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, could help doctors better diagnose and monitor the disease.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Sensor detects whiff of bad breath

Sensor detects whiff of bad breath
Ever wish you could do a quick “breath check” before an important meeting or a big date? Now researchers, reporting in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, have developed a sensor that detects tiny amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas, the compound responsible for bad breath, in human exhalations.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, June 6, 2018

What Women (and Men) Should Know About HRT

What Women (and Men) Should Know About HRT
The year 2002 was a worrying year for women who were taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to combat troublesome menopausal symptoms.  Bold newspaper headlines reported that a study called The Women’s Health Initiative, conducted by the National Institute of Health, showed an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease, stroke, gall bladder disease and blood clots in the legs and lungs of those taking HRT for longer than five years. It was hardly prime time to be prescribed estrogen. But what are the facts in 2018?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, June 4, 2018