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Why Did Anthony Bourdain Commit Suicide?

Why Did Anthony Bourdain Commit Suicide?
Albert Camus, the French humanist, wrote, “There is only one true philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy.” Pliny the Elder had said earlier, “Admit the miseries of our life on earth, suicide is God’s best gift to man.”

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, July 2, 2018 - Full Story

The Greatest Threat to Your Life

Blood clot, Thrombosis, that occurs in the heart, brain or legs
Ask anyone, “What’s the greatest medical risk of dying?” and they’ll answer “Heart attack.” The correct answer is a blood clot (Thrombosis) that occurs in the heart, brain or legs.  Now, a shocking report in the health publication, “LifeExtension”, shows what can happen to our legs when we’re flying at 35,000 feet. So with an aging population, and increased air travel, what can be done to decrease the risk of a blood clot?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Tuesday, June 26, 2018 - Full Story

“But Roosevelt Knows How To Be President!”

But Roosevelt Knows How To Be President!
72 years ago I arrived in Boston. I’d been accepted as a student at The Harvard Medical School. That night a full moon shone on the school’s white marble buildings, an awe-inspiring sight I’ve never forgotten.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, June 18, 2018 - Full Story

Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfaces

Attacking bacteria with shark skin-inspired surfaces
Sharks are often the subject of TV specials or news stories focusing on their attacks on humans. But scientists are finding that sharks could inspire a new type of surface that would attack bacteria, helping humans instead of hurting them.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, June 13, 2018 - Full Story

Inexpensive detector is like ‘Velcro®’ for cancer cells

Inexpensive detector is like 'Velcro®' for cancer cells
Researchers have developed a new type of sensor that acts like Velcro® for prostate cancer cells, sticking them to a modified frosted glass slide, like those used in science classes, so that they can be identified from blood samples. The low-cost method, reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, could help doctors better diagnose and monitor the disease.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, June 6, 2018 - Full Story

Sensor detects whiff of bad breath

Sensor detects whiff of bad breath
Ever wish you could do a quick “breath check” before an important meeting or a big date? Now researchers, reporting in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, have developed a sensor that detects tiny amounts of hydrogen sulfide gas, the compound responsible for bad breath, in human exhalations.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, June 6, 2018 - Full Story

What Women (and Men) Should Know About HRT

What Women (and Men) Should Know About HRT
The year 2002 was a worrying year for women who were taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to combat troublesome menopausal symptoms.  Bold newspaper headlines reported that a study called The Women’s Health Initiative, conducted by the National Institute of Health, showed an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease, stroke, gall bladder disease and blood clots in the legs and lungs of those taking HRT for longer than five years. It was hardly prime time to be prescribed estrogen. But what are the facts in 2018?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, June 4, 2018 - Full Story

Helping dental retainers and aligners fight off bacteria

Helping dental retainers and aligners fight off bacteriaClear, plastic aligners have been growing in popularity as alternatives to bulky, metal braces. And once the teeth are straightened, patients graduate to plastic retainers to maintain the perfect smile. But these appliances can become contaminated, so one group is now reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a film to prevent bacteria from growing on them.

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, May 29, 2018 - Full Story

Heart Failure, What You Should Know About Mitochondria

Heart Failure, What You Should Know About Mitochondria
Ask anyone what is the nation’s number one killer and most people will say heart attack. But how many know that congestive heart failure (CHF) is the fastest growing cause of heart disease in North America? Why is this happening? And why are mitochondria of vital importance, particularly as we all grow older?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, May 21, 2018 - Full Story

Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pill

Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pill
For women, mammograms are a sometimes uncomfortable, but necessary, annual ritual. But this procedure doesn’t always provide accurate results, and it exposes women to X-rays. In a study appearing in ACS’ journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, scientists report that they have developed a non-invasive “disease screening pill” that can make cancerous tumors light up when exposed to near-infrared light in mice without using radiation.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 16, 2018 - Full Story

Why Humans Get Kidney Stones and Gorillas Rarely

Why Humans Get Kidney Stones and Gorillas Rarely
Do large doses of vitamin C increase the risk of kidney stones? It’s a question I’m often asked, having reported the medical value of vitamin C in decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). So is this concern fact or fiction? Or does vitamin C, by making acid urine, combine with calcium and oxalate to form stones?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, May 14, 2018 - Full Story

Does Melatonin Do Anything? (VIDEO)

Does Melatonin Do Anything?

Reactions explains the chemistry of this popular sleep aid:

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, May 10, 2018 - Full Story

Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugs

Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugs
New treatments for epilepsy are sorely needed because current medications don’t work for many people with the disease. To find new leads, researchers have now turned to the sea — a source of unique natural products that have been largely untapped for prospective drugs. The scientists report in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience that two metabolites produced by a fungus from the Red Sea look promising.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 9, 2018 - Full Story

Coaxing the immune system to fight cancer

Coaxing the immune system to fight cancer
Immuno therapy was once the black sheep of cancer research. Originally conceived over a century ago, it aims to stimulate a patient’s own immune system to fight cancer. That’s a very different approach than chemotherapy, which essentially poisons tumors.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, May 9, 2018 - Full Story

Nutmeg’s hidden power: Helping the liver

Nutmeg's hidden power: Helping the liver, Nutmeg prevents damage to the liver
Smelling nutmeg evokes images of fall, pumpkin pie and hot apple cider. But the spice has been used for years in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gastrointestinal illnesses. Now one group reports in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research that they have figured out how nutmeg helps other organs, specifically the liver.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 9, 2018 - Full Story

Politicians Take Note - Readers Damn Opioid Summit

Politicians Take Note - Readers Damn Opioid Summit
This week my e-mail nearly developed “Rigor Mortis” from the volume of responses to my column about an opioid summit. I recently told readers the government’s proposed opioid summit was a waste of money. I asked for their opinion. The majority agreed with me. But some labelled me barbaric, cruel and Godless for praising Singapore’s system of justice.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, May 7, 2018 - Full Story

Precise targeting technique could regulate gut bacteria, curtailing disease

Precise targeting technique could regulate gut bacteria, curtailing disease
Emerging evidence suggests that microbes in the digestive system have a big influence on human health and may play a role in the onset of disease throughout the body. Now, in a study appearing in ACS Chemical Biology, scientists report that they have potentially found a way to use chemical compounds to target and inhibit the growth of specific microbes in the gut associated with diseases without causing harm to other beneficial organisms.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - Full Story

New, accurate Israeli method detects early breast cancer

New, accurate Israeli method detects early breast cancer
Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Soroka University Medical Center in Beersheva announced the development of a new and accurate method of screening for early breast cancer, using inexpensive technology for breath and urine analysis.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - Full Story

Gifford-Jones; Do I Look Like an Addict?

Gifford-Jones; Do I Look Like an Addict?
“But why must I give you a urine sample?” I asked the receptionist at the marijuana clinic. She replied, “Because we won’t see you without one, and each time you come back you must give us one. It’s to make sure you’re not taking illegal drugs.”

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, April 30, 2018 - Full Story

Is cannabis the new wonder drug?

Is cannabis the new wonder drug?
Israeli scientists are exploring cannabis as a treatment, or even cure, for conditions ranging from cancer to Parkinson’s, asthma, insomnia, PTSD, epilepsy and IBS.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - Full Story