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Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson’s Disease

Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson's Disease
The rabies virus wreaks havoc on the brain, triggering psychosis and death. To get where it needs to go, the virus must first trick the nervous system and cross the blood brain barrier — a process that makes it of interest in drug design. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a way to exploit the rabies virus machinery to deliver a Parkinson’s disease medication directly to the brain.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - Full Story

Marijuana for Gifford-Jones?

Marijuana for Gifford-Jones?

Why would I, at my age, want to start smoking pot, when I’d much prefer a glass of chardonnay? It’s because I’ve suffered annoying neck pain for years due to an old injury which happened in Japan. Besides, my experience with the plant may help others who suffer from chronic pain day after day, and find no relief from other painkillers.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, April 23, 2018 - Full Story

FDA recommends approval of marijuana-derived drug that doesn’t get you high

FDA recommends approval of marijuana-derived drug that doesn’t get you highSo that’s it, right? We can end all the nonsense about weed being “medicine” because the properties in weed that get you high are not the same ones that can help with pain relief – and the least efficient delivery method for any substance is smoking it.

By Dan Calabrese - Thursday, April 19, 2018 - Full Story

Synthesizing a deadly mushroom toxin

Synthesizing a deadly mushroom toxin, Death-Cap Mushroom Toxin α-Amanitin, fight cancer
The death-cap mushroom has a long history as a tool of murder and suicide, going back to ancient Roman times. The fungus, Amanita phalloides, produces one of the world’s deadliest toxins: α‐amanitin. While it may seem ill-advised, researchers are eager to synthesize the toxin because studies have shown that it could help fight cancer. Scientists now report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society how they overcame obstacles to synthesize the death-cap killer compound.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - Full Story

Cell discovery holds out promise for Parkinson’s therapy

Cell discovery holds out promise for Parkinson’s therapy
An Israeli-led international study featured on the cover of The Journal of Neuroscience in February, holds the promise of advancing the field of cell-replacement therapy for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD).

By ISRAEL21c - Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - Full Story

Israeli scientist working on Alzheimer’s vaccine

Israeli scientist working on Alzheimer’s vaccine
Alzheimer’s disease, affecting some 47 million people worldwide, for now remains an irreversible and fatal brain disorder. Taking a proactive approach, an Israeli brain researcher is developing a vaccine against this devastating disease.

By ISRAEL21c - Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - Full Story

We Need Lee Kwan Yew – Not an Opioid Summit

Lee Kwan Yew, Death for Drug Dealers, Opiods
Why don’t we learn from history when the question is a no-brainer? For instance, a recent editorial in a major Canadian newspaper states, “We Need an Opioid Summit.”  One could add to this headline, “a Summit that would solve nothing and cost taxpayers millions of dollars.” What we actually need is the perspective of Lee Kwan Yew, Prime Minister of Singapore. Unfortunately he’s dead.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, April 16, 2018 - Full Story

Exercise Can Kill You

Exercise Can Kill You
The Earl of Darby once remarked that “Those who don’t take time for wellness, will eventually have to make time for sickness.” Like many doctors, I too have advised patients and readers to exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. Now, Dr. Maureen Brogan, Associate Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College, reports that intense, repetitive, motion exercise can cause rhabdomyolysis. And in rare cases it can kill.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, April 9, 2018 - Full Story

Lighting the way to targeted therapies and fewer side effects

Lighting the way to targeted therapies and fewer side effects
Side effects from drugs working in non-target locations within the body can cause debilitating symptoms, often resulting in patients stopping their course of treatment early. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are developing strategies to reduce side effects by turning drugs on and off with light in specific locations, such as a tumor.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 4, 2018 - Full Story

Connecting hearing helper molecules to the ear bone

Connecting hearing helper molecules to the ear bone
Hearing loss is a common affliction associated with advancing age and exposure to very loud noises, affecting two-thirds of adults over age 70. But living with hearing loss may not be inevitable. Scientists report in the ACS journal Bioconjugate Chemistry a novel approach to the restoration of hearing that delivers stimulants of cell growth and connectivity directly to damaged ear cells.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 4, 2018 - Full Story

ECGs on the move, thanks to Israeli ingenuity

ECGs on the move, thanks to Israeli ingenuity
If your doctor orders an electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) to check your heart rhythm and blood flow or to diagnose a heart attack, a technician will stick 10 or 12 adhesive electrodes to your chest, arms and legs. A computer then creates a graph showing the electrical impulses moving through your heart while you’re lying still or exercising.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, April 4, 2018 - Full Story

Is There a Doctor On the Plane?

Is There a Doctor On the Plane?
What is it that doctors worry about when they’re flying?  It’s not fear of flying. They know that travelling by air is safer than driving a car. Rather, it’s the possibility that they will hear a sudden announcement, “Is there a doctor on the plane?” This is when the brain shifts into high gear.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, April 2, 2018 - Full Story

High-tech capsule could be alternative to colonoscopy

High-tech capsule could be alternative to colonoscopy
Let’s face it: Nobody wants to go through a colonoscopy, recommended for people over 50 to screen for colorectal cancer — the third most common cancer, with approximately 1.4 million new cases diagnosed worldwide each year, and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - Full Story

New drug-release method avoids harming healthy tissue

New drug-release method avoids harming healthy tissue
Researchers at the Technion Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Engineering have developed a new, highly targeted technology for drug delivery that uses light to affect only the diseased tissue the drug is targeting.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - Full Story

Making water from the air to keep kids healthy in India

Making water from the air to keep kids healthy in India
Max Simonovsky’s two-and-a-half-year-old son was well trained in routine handwashing. But one day when the water in his Rehovot neighborhood was shut off for repairs, the boy reasoned that if water wasn’t available, he therefore had no need to wash his hands after playing outside.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - Full Story

The Philippines Finance Oral Insulin Pill

The Philippines Finance Oral Insulin Pill,
A Spanish proverb states, “He loses all who loses the right moment.” I had a similar thought a few weeks ago when I wrote that, “a brain that’s full of knowledge has no room left to dream.”

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, March 19, 2018 - Full Story

US Government’s Crackdown On PrimaryCare Physicians

 US Government's Crackdown On PrimaryCare Physicians
To understand how the government has stepped over the line with their current crackdown on primary healthcare physicians, we must look at how the politicians responded to the opioid crisis when it first reared its ugly head.

By Robert Steven Ingebo - Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - Full Story

Fast-tracking endocrine assays

Fast-tracking endocrine assays
Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals can cause health effects, such as reduced fertility and increased incidences of obesity and diabetes. Two decades ago, Congress directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to screen substances for this activity. Now, the agency is ramping up its efforts, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - Full Story

Mediterranean Diet for a Long Life

Mediterranean Diet for a Long Life

Leonardo da Vinci once remarked, “Trifles make perfection and perfection is no trifle.” Trifles can make a huge difference in surgery, when building rockets, in nutrition, or in life generally. For instance, a report in the publication LifeExtension shows that a Mediterranean Diet prolongs life. As we all age, this is no trifle.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, March 12, 2018 - Full Story

More realistic and accurate organs-on-chips

More realistic and accurate organs-on-chips
In a step toward better diagnosis and treatment of digestive conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, scientists report in ACS Biomaterials & Engineering that they have developed a first-of-its-kind collagen-based membrane for use in microchips.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, March 12, 2018 - Full Story