Science-Technology

WhatFinger

A bullet-proof heating pad

A bullet-proof heating pad
Sometimes nothing feels better on stiff, aching joints than a little heat. But many heating pads and wraps are rigid and provide uneven warmth, especially when the person is moving around. Researchers have now made a wearable heater by modifying woven Kevlar® fabric with nanowires that conduct and retain heat. They report their results in ACS’ journal Nano Letters.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, November 3, 2018

Questioning Medical Research

Medical Research
John Ioannidis first burst onto the national scene in 2005 with a groundbreaking paper titled “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False.” 1 His statistical analysis and logic are impeccable, and his paper has never been seriously refuted. Furthermore, he has had a tremendous impact: the paper has been viewed more than 2.5 million times.2

Since then, Ioannidis has gone on to show that the best scientists don’t always get funded, why neuroscience is unreliable, why most clinical research is useless, and that most economic studies are exaggerated. In other words, the process by which we acquire new knowledge is fundamentally flawed and much of what we think we know is wrong2
These days he’s aimed his attacks at nutrition research and guidelines on disease definition statements.

By Jack Dini - Sunday, October 28, 2018

Do astronauts need sunscreen? (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON — Space is full of potentially dangerous radiation. Here on Earth, our atmosphere and magnetic field protect us from the worst of it. Astronauts on a deep-space mission would need other forms of protection. In collaboration with National Chemistry Week, this Reactions video is all about chemistry in space:



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, October 25, 2018

3D-printed lithium-ion batteries

3D-printed lithium-ion batteries
Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially available batteries. But researchers have developed a new method to 3D print lithium-ion batteries in virtually any shape. They report their results in ACS Applied Energy Materials.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, October 17, 2018

WATCH: What makes tardigrades such great survivors

WASHINGTON—Tardigrades are tiny animals that can live in water droplets just about anywhere. When those water droplets dry out, tardigrades undergo an astonishing transformation to survive the lack of water. In this video, Reactions explores the chemistry of these remarkable survivors



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, October 11, 2018


Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator
Water covers most of the globe, yet many regions still suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. If scientists could efficiently and sustainably turn seawater into clean water, a looming global water crisis might be averted. Now, inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers have devised a solar steam generator that approaches 100 percent efficiency for the production of clean water. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 29, 2018

Ants surrender their venomous secrets

Ants surrender their venomous secrets
Venoms produced by snails, snakes, scorpions and spiders contain numerous bioactive compounds that could lead to therapeutic drugs or insect-specific pesticides. Yet little is known about venoms produced by insects, in part because each bug contains such a tiny amount. Researchers recently responded to this challenge by conducting one of the first intensive studies of ant venom. They have now published their findings in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 24, 2018

Sensors that are literally ‘music to one’s ears’ (video)

Researchers have found a new use for a 3,000-year-old African musical instrument: detecting toxic substances and counterfeit medications. The sensor, based on the mbira (pronounced “em-bir’-uh”) is inexpensive and easy to operate, allowing its use in developing regions, the researchers say.



By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 24, 2018

How silver nanoparticles cut odors (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON, — Trendy workout clothes may advertise that special silver nanoparticles embedded in the fabric will cut the sweaty odor that builds up from repeated gym visits. It turns out there’s some truth to these claims. Silver can kill the bacteria that cause B.O., and new techniques, including nanotech, allow clothing manufacturers to incorporate silver that doesn’t come out in the wash or harm the environment. In this video, Reactions explains how all of that is possible. And don’t forget: #NationalNanoDay is October 9, and ACS is celebrating science on the nanoscale all week. Whether you’re a nano expert, a teacher in the classroom, a student interested in career opportunities or just curious to learn more, visit http://www.acs.org/nano

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By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 22, 2018

Biodegradable plastic blends offer new options for disposal

Biodegradable plastic blends offer new options for disposal
Imagine throwing your empty plastic water bottle into a household composting bin that breaks down the plastic and produces biogas to help power your home. Now, researchers have taken an early step toward this futuristic scenario by showing that certain blends of bioplastics can decompose under diverse conditions. They report their results in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 10, 2018

On the Red-Green Confusion

On the Red-Green Confusion
To begin with, I’m not color-blind and can quite easily differentiate between those two colors. My commiserations to anyone who cannot!

On a larger scale, you might think it’s no issue. Let me tell you, nothing could be further from the truth.

Let’s begin with the easy part.

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Sunday, September 9, 2018

How “double-acting” baking powder acts twice (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON—Baking powder is used to raise baked goods like cakes and cookies. It’s often sold under the label “double-acting,” but what does that mean? In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of how baking powder can act twice to make bubbles in your baked goods:



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 6, 2018

Why plastic bottles are recycled into clothes (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON—Exercise clothes and trendy handbags made from recycled plastic are all the rage and help consumers feel as if they are doing their part for the environment. But there are several reasons plastic bottles are recycled into clothes, which can’t be recycled a second time, instead of new bottles. In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry behind what happens to your soda bottle after you toss it in the bin:



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, August 30, 2018

Popping balloons with style

WASHINGTON—Orange peels contain limonene, and this chemical is the key to a party trick in which you can pop a balloon with a twist. Limonene is an exceptionally good solvent for the rubber in balloons, but some other solvents can do it too. In this video, Reactions explains why only some chemicals can burst your bubble (or balloon):



By American Chemical Society - Friday, August 10, 2018