Science-Technology

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WATCH: What makes tardigrades such great survivors

WASHINGTON—Tardigrades are tiny animals that can live in water droplets just about anywhere. When those water droplets dry out, tardigrades undergo an astonishing transformation to survive the lack of water. In this video, Reactions explores the chemistry of these remarkable survivors



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, October 11, 2018


Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator
Water covers most of the globe, yet many regions still suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. If scientists could efficiently and sustainably turn seawater into clean water, a looming global water crisis might be averted. Now, inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers have devised a solar steam generator that approaches 100 percent efficiency for the production of clean water. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 29, 2018

Ants surrender their venomous secrets

Ants surrender their venomous secrets
Venoms produced by snails, snakes, scorpions and spiders contain numerous bioactive compounds that could lead to therapeutic drugs or insect-specific pesticides. Yet little is known about venoms produced by insects, in part because each bug contains such a tiny amount. Researchers recently responded to this challenge by conducting one of the first intensive studies of ant venom. They have now published their findings in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 24, 2018

Sensors that are literally ‘music to one’s ears’ (video)

Researchers have found a new use for a 3,000-year-old African musical instrument: detecting toxic substances and counterfeit medications. The sensor, based on the mbira (pronounced “em-bir’-uh”) is inexpensive and easy to operate, allowing its use in developing regions, the researchers say.



By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 24, 2018

How silver nanoparticles cut odors (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON, — Trendy workout clothes may advertise that special silver nanoparticles embedded in the fabric will cut the sweaty odor that builds up from repeated gym visits. It turns out there’s some truth to these claims. Silver can kill the bacteria that cause B.O., and new techniques, including nanotech, allow clothing manufacturers to incorporate silver that doesn’t come out in the wash or harm the environment. In this video, Reactions explains how all of that is possible. And don’t forget: #NationalNanoDay is October 9, and ACS is celebrating science on the nanoscale all week. Whether you’re a nano expert, a teacher in the classroom, a student interested in career opportunities or just curious to learn more, visit http://www.acs.org/nano

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By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 22, 2018

Biodegradable plastic blends offer new options for disposal

Biodegradable plastic blends offer new options for disposal
Imagine throwing your empty plastic water bottle into a household composting bin that breaks down the plastic and produces biogas to help power your home. Now, researchers have taken an early step toward this futuristic scenario by showing that certain blends of bioplastics can decompose under diverse conditions. They report their results in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 10, 2018

On the Red-Green Confusion

On the Red-Green Confusion
To begin with, I’m not color-blind and can quite easily differentiate between those two colors. My commiserations to anyone who cannot!

On a larger scale, you might think it’s no issue. Let me tell you, nothing could be further from the truth.

Let’s begin with the easy part.

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Sunday, September 9, 2018

How “double-acting” baking powder acts twice (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON—Baking powder is used to raise baked goods like cakes and cookies. It’s often sold under the label “double-acting,” but what does that mean? In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of how baking powder can act twice to make bubbles in your baked goods:



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 6, 2018

Why plastic bottles are recycled into clothes (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON—Exercise clothes and trendy handbags made from recycled plastic are all the rage and help consumers feel as if they are doing their part for the environment. But there are several reasons plastic bottles are recycled into clothes, which can’t be recycled a second time, instead of new bottles. In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry behind what happens to your soda bottle after you toss it in the bin:



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, August 30, 2018

Popping balloons with style

WASHINGTON—Orange peels contain limonene, and this chemical is the key to a party trick in which you can pop a balloon with a twist. Limonene is an exceptionally good solvent for the rubber in balloons, but some other solvents can do it too. In this video, Reactions explains why only some chemicals can burst your bubble (or balloon):



By American Chemical Society - Friday, August 10, 2018

New laser solution could slow spread of forest fires

Aggressive wildfires are rampaging through many countries this summer, bringing death and destruction in their wake. In California alone, firefighters are scrambling to control 18 separate blazes.

Texas, Oregon, Florida, New Jersey, as well as Canada, Greece, India, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the UK are among other areas battling massive forest fires, a phenomenon experts expect will only increase due to climate change.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Fast, cheap and colorful 3D printing

Fast, cheap and colorful 3D printing
People are exploring the use of 3D printing for wide-ranging applications, including manufacturing, medical devices, fashion and even food. But one of the most efficient forms of 3D printing suffers from a major drawback: It can only print objects that are gray or black in color. Now, researchers have tweaked the method so it can print in all of the colors of the rainbow. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 1, 2018

Video: How does air conditioning work?

WASHINGTON—Air conditioners pull off the seemingly magical feat of making the air inside a home, car or shopping mall deliciously chilly. The source of that sweet relief is chemistry. In this video, Reactions explains how refrigerants and physical chemistry combine to help you beat the summer heat:



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, July 26, 2018

Scientists discover 12-mile-long lake under the surface of Mars

Scientists discover 12-mile-long lake under the surface of MarsI’m not sure this means we’ll soon be making contact with Uncle Martin or Gazoo, you dum dums.

There may not be any life on Mars at all, and Rob is the big Bowie fan so it feels like he should have written this. But water is a necessity for any type of life – plant or animal – and until now we didn’t know for sure that there was any water at all on Mars.

By Dan Calabrese - Wednesday, July 25, 2018