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Elberton, Georgia Guidestones

Dismantling "R.C. Christian's" Monument

by Judi McLeod, Canadafreepress.com
Tuesday, March 22, 2005

The Georgia Guidestones have been part of the landscape in Elberton, Georgia for a quarter of a century. Tourists flood to Elberton each year to see the 19-foot-tall granite monument, often posing for pictures standing beside it.

After 25 years, a Christian organization named The Resistance is calling for the monument's immediate removal.

"The satanic Georgia Guidestones must be destroyed," insists John Conner of The Resistance. "The Guidestones should be smashed into a million pieces, and then the rubble used for a construction purpose."

The notion of hacking the monument into smithereens for construction scrap has a certain appeal, given the hype of how it came to dominate the lonely landscape in the first place.

The Georgia Guidestones were ordered, constructed and paid for in total anonymity.

The monument, which has stood since 1980, consists of four large stones with 10 commandments engraved into the sides in eight different languages.

Some folk call them the 10 commandments, others a set of New Age Golden Rules.

The first commandment or rule calls on everyone to "Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature."

A little difficult to achieve when considering that the current world population tops 6 billion.

Other commandments or rules speak of a world court and a new universal language.

The origination of the Georgia Guidestones is steeped in bizarre mysticism. They were said to be paid for by an anonymous man with the unlikely name of R.C. Christian back in 1979. Indeed, the name of the donor has remained a secret ever since. As folk legend would have it, a certain Mr. Christian came to town out of nowhere and just as quickly returned to nowhere.

Elberton, Georgia is self-touted as the granite capitol of the world, leading many to believe the creation of the monument was a publicity stunt for the town.

Then there is the camp that dismisses the stones as the creation of an eccentric environmentalist.

Many Christians have seen the Georgia Guidestones as the New World Order's 10 Commandments, of the type already written up by United Nations Poster Boy Maurice Strong and former Soviet Union President Mikhail Gorbachev, the duo who authored the Earth Charter.

Others see the stones as an out-of-the-way monument of the occult.

Whatever the reasons for their existence, Conner and Company have organized a national movement for the destruction of the stones.

Conner is the author of The Resistance Manifesto, a publication that exposes Satanic influences in America, including the meaning behind the pseudonym "R.C. Christian", the name of the man who paid to have the monument erected.

The Resistance is a worldwide subculture of Christians "fighting the invasion of privacy from the growing New World Order."

In addition to organizing national movements for the destruction of the Georgia Guidestones, members of The Resistance organize to hit the airwaves. They often flood the airwaves of call-in radio and television shows on topics of interests where they can throw the direction of the show and its host in their favour.

"Power to The Resistance" is both their motivation and their catchphrase.

According to Conner, the flood of calls has been made to numerous national programs, including Larry King, Bill O'Reilly, Shawn Hannity. Allan Colmes and Michael Savage.

"People need to remember that the airwaves belong to the public, and that these corporations have the privilege of using them," says Conner. "We simply exercise our rights to free speech over the airwaves, which we own."

If you've never had a gander at the Guidestones, you can see them by logging on to www.TheResistanceManifesto.com. But you better log on soon, as group members insist they're coming down.

Meanwhile, stray dogs, cats and coyotes in Elberton, Georgia, will be looking for a new place to leave their collective calling cards.

Previous article on the Guidestones.


Canada Free Press founding editor Most recent by Judi McLeod is an award-winning journalist with 30 years experience in the print media. Her work has appeared on Newsmax.com, Drudge Report, Foxnews.com, Glenn Beck. Judi can be reached at: judi@canadafreepress.com


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