WhatFinger

We cannot change the climate no matter what we spend. But we must adapt and prepare for the inevitable cyclones, floods, droughts and bushfires

Surviving “the Worst Evaaaah”.


By —— Bio and Archives--March 1, 2019

Global Warming-Energy-Environment | Comments | Print Friendly | Subscribe | Email Us

Surviving the Worst EvaaaahThe media loves disaster stories – floods, cyclones, heat waves, droughts and fires - each one “the worst Evaaaah” (evaah since the last one). Each report of catastrophe is usually followed by a religious chant about “man-made global warming”.

Pretending we can change global climate by waging a war on carbon dioxide is foolish and dangerous nonsense.

Sensible people accept that natural disasters have happened, and will happen again. We cannot stop that, but like the Boy Scouts, we can “Be Prepared” by ensuring our essential infrastructure is more weather-proof.

.

When cyclones, floods, droughts and bushfires strike we need disaster-proof helipads, rail links, roads, bridges, water and electricity supply.

Not one solar farm or wind turbine will survive a severe cyclone, and in wild, cloudy weather they will produce zero power. And giant batteries/pumped storage are just a short-term energy crutch, not a source of reliable energy.

We cannot change the climate no matter what we spend. But we must adapt and prepare for the inevitable cyclones, floods, droughts and bushfires. There will always be one that challenges past records.

Three things are needed:

To prevent catastrophic bushfires, we need to remove excess fuel with frequent small controlled fires.

To reduce the severity of droughts and floods, we need more dams and weirs.

And for everything, we need the continuous reliable electricity that comes from coal, gas or nuclear.

 


CFPSubcribe

Only YOU can save CFP from Social Media Suppression. Tweet, Post, Forward, Subscribe or Bookmark us

Viv Forbes -- Bio and Archives | Comments

Viv Forbes, Chairman, The Carbon Sense Coalition, has spent his life working in exploration, mining, farming, infrastructure, financial analysis and political commentary. He has worked for government departments, private companies and now works as a private contractor and farmer.

Viv has also been a guest writer for the Asian Wall Street Journal, Business Queensland and mining newspapers. He was awarded the “Australian Adam Smith Award for Services to the Free Society” in 1988, and has written widely on political, technical and economic subjects.


Commenting Policy

Please adhere to our commenting policy to avoid being banned. As a privately owned website, we reserve the right to remove any comment and ban any user at any time.

Comments that contain spam, advertising, vulgarity, threats of violence and death, racism, anti-Semitism, or personal or abusive attacks on other users may be removed and result in a ban.
-- Follow these instructions on registering: