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Step aside Superman, steel is no competition for this new material

Step aside Superman, steel is no competition for this new material
When it comes to materials, there is no question as to who wins the strongman competition. Spider silk is known as being the strongest fabric, and steel, ceramics and glass fibers are the best building materials. But now, researchers are reporting in ACS Nano that specially arranged nano-sized cellulose fibers are the strongest material of them all, in a move that might cause some to re-name Superman the “man of cellulose.”

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 16, 2018 - Full Story

Placeboism

Placeboism
Everyone knows (or ought to): Everything is getting better all the time. That’s certainly true in spring or early summer, when nature re-awakens after a long and cold winter but, just perhaps, not all the time.

And that’s why cunning politicians like to make big promises and have elections at those times.  That’s just one example of the placebo effect, the proclamation that “your vote counts.”

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Saturday, May 12, 2018 - Full Story

Battery-free ‘smart’ toys move closer to commercial reality (video)

battery-free-smart-toys-move-closer-to-commercial-reality-video
Rubber duckies could soon be at the forefront of an electronic revolution. In ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, scientists report they have used specialized nanogenerators that gather energy from mechanical vibrations to transform squeaky bathtub companions and other conventional children’s toys into ‘smart’ electronics. They say the finding could have broad commercial applications, leading to the development of battery-free, self-powered toys, medical sensors and other devices. Watch a video of prototype toys here.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 9, 2018 - Full Story

Jeeves, the ashtray is full—buy a new (flying) car!

Jeeves, the ashtray is full -- buy a new (flying) car!
Are you ready to get your new (electric) flying machine? Perhaps you already know, it’s supposed to be coming to a store near you, soon:

Airbus is already working on several electric aircraft programs, including an autonomous electric VTOL aircraft, but now they are partnering with Audi and Italdesign to combine that with electric cars.

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Sunday, May 6, 2018 - Full Story

Improving 3-D printing of plastic parts

Improving 3-D printing of plastic parts
Robots that can build homes, marathoners’ running shoes and NASA’s upcoming spacecraft all have one thing in common: 3-D printed parts. But as enthusiasm for 3-D printing continues to grow and expand across markets, the objects printed by the process can have weaknesses.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - Full Story

Israeli protective vest to be tested on Orion spacecraft

Israeli protective vest to be tested on Orion spacecraft
The AstroRad radiation protection vest designed by Tel Aviv-based StemRad will be worn by a mannequin on NASA’s test flight of its unmanned Orion spacecraft, according to an agreement signed by NASA Acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot and Israel Space Agency Director Avi Blasberger during the 34th Space Symposium in Colorado last month.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - Full Story

How airbags work (video)

How airbags work (video)

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - Full Story

Cheaper and easier way found to make plastic semiconductors

Cheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors
Cheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors will soon be a reality thanks to a breakthrough by chemists at the University of Waterloo.

Professor Derek Schipper and his team at Waterloo have developed a way to make conjugated polymers, plastics that conduct electricity like metals, using a simple dehydration reaction the only byproduct of which is water.

By Waterloo - Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - Full Story

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries safer

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries safer
From cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer battery, scientists report in the ACS journal Nano Letters that the addition of nanowires can not only enhance the battery’s fire-resistant capabilities, but also its other properties.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - Full Story

Portable device to sniff out trapped humans

Portable device to sniff out trapped humans
The first step after buildings collapse from an earthquake, bombing or other disaster is to rescue people who could be trapped in the rubble. But finding entrapped humans among the ruins can be challenging. Scientists now report in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry the development of an inexpensive, selective sensor that is light and portable enough for first responders to hold in their hands or for drones to carry on a search for survivors.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, April 23, 2018 - Full Story

Space—an Eternal Frontier

Space--an Eternal Frontier
From astronomers to futuristic dreamers, the inter-stellar space is the real frontier—for many centuries already.

Anyone who’s looking at the firmament on a clear summer night is likely to agree. There is a “world” of stars, planets, moons, galaxies, and a host of other—mostly unfathomable—objects out there. One can’t deny that.

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Friday, April 20, 2018 - Full Story

Old proteins tell tales of historical artifacts and the people who touched them

Old proteins tell tales of historical artifacts and the people who touched them  
Pages like this one from the Milan death registries, recorded during the height of the plague outbreak in 1630, have revealed biochemical secrets..

“Dead men tell no tales” is a common saying, but according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the old proteins on historical artifacts, such as manuscripts and clothing, can tell quite a yarn.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - Full Story

Cactus roots inspire creation of water-retaining material

Cactus roots inspire creation of water-retaining material
During rare desert rainfalls, cacti waste no time sopping up and storing a storm’s precious precipitation. Inspired by this natural phenomenon, scientists report in a study appearing ACS Macro Letters that they have developed a material that mimics cactus roots’ ability to rapidly absorb and retain vast amounts of water with a minimal amount of evaporation. They say this unique material could lead to new and improved cosmetics, medical devices and other everyday products.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - Full Story

Pulling valuable metals from e-waste makes financial sense

Recovering gold, copper and other metals from e-waste is cheaper than mining these metals
Electronic waste — including discarded televisions, computers and mobile phones — is one of the fastest-growing waste categories worldwide. For years, recyclers have gleaned usable parts, including metals, from this waste stream.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - Full Story

What is flame jetting? (video)

What is flame jetting? (video)
Bizarre phenomenon is explained with help from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - Full Story

Robotics takes mass spec to the third dimension for forensics, pharma applications

Robotic Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry
Within the past decade, many advancements have been made in the 3-D market from printing to movies. Now scientists report in ACS’ Analytical Chemistry that by combining a robotic arm and mass spectrometry, they can analyze the surface of irregularly shaped 3-D objects, potentially opening up new branches of forensics and pharmaceutics.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 4, 2018 - Full Story

New technology will enable computers to run 100x faster

New technology will enable computers to run 100x faster
Researchers have created technology that will enable our computers, text messages and phone calls to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, April 4, 2018 - Full Story

Petrichor, the smell of rain (video)

Petrichor, the smell of rain

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, April 3, 2018 - Full Story

Browser and search engine team up to help you stay private on the internet

Vivaldi Technologies
“Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean that they aren’t out to get you.”

I don’t know, or care, who said that originally, but in this age of hacking and cyber corruption – and the deep state trying desperately to defeat the forces of light - it’s becoming increasingly clear that there appears to be folks out in cyberspace who don’t have your best interests in mind.

By Jim Bray - Tuesday, March 27, 2018 - Full Story

Today is Yesterday’s Tomorrow

Today is Yesterday's Tomorrow
Science fiction has predicted many of today’s realities from cell phones to tablets. Many things that are today part of History like walking on the moon, organ transplants, and space stations were once flights of fancy.

By Dr. Robert R. Owens - Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - Full Story