Science-Technology

WhatFinger

Should Santa wear a flame-retardant suit? (VIDEO)

By American Chemical Society - Friday, December 14, 2018 - Full Story

Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper

  Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper  
The image on this cell phone case can change because it was made with rewritable paper.

Even in this digital age, paper is still everywhere. Often, printed materials get used once and are then discarded, creating waste and potentially pollution. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of an easy-to-make “rewritable” paper that can be drawn or printed on over and over again. The messages can last more than half a year, compared to other rewritable papers whose messages fade after a few days or a few months.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, December 6, 2018 - Full Story

Why Antarctic fish don’t freeze to death (VIDEO)

Why Antarctic fish don't freeze to death (VIDEO)
WASHINGTON—The notothenioid fishes that inhabit the Antarctic Ocean have evolved an unusual adaptation to living in icy waters. Their blood contains antifreeze proteins that prevent ice from growing within the fishes’ bodies and actually lower the freezing temperature of their tissues. In this video, Reactions meets these bizarre animals:

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, December 6, 2018 - Full Story

Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions (video)

Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions
Human skin contains sensitive nerve cells that detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. To help robots and prosthetic devices attain these abilities, scientists are trying to develop electronic skins. Now researchers report a new method in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that creates an ultrathin, stretchable electronic skin, which could be used for a variety of human-machine interactions.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, December 3, 2018 - Full Story

California fire crews drink water pulled from thin air

  California fire crews drink water pulled from thin air  
A victim of Hurricane Michael in Florida receiving water from a Watergen unit, October 2018. Photo courtesy of Watergen USA

An emergency response vehicle (ERV) carrying an innovative Israeli machine that pulls pure drinking water directly out of ambient air is on its way to California, to provide hydration to police and firefighters dealing with the aftermath of two massive wildfires that have taken at least 87 lives and destroyed over 10,000 homes and businesses.

By ISRAEL21c -- Abigail Klein Leichman- Friday, November 30, 2018 - Full Story

What’s the difference between relative humidity and dew point?

What's the difference between relative humidity and dew point?
WASHINGTON—Meteorologists often report the amount of moisture in the air as relative humidity or dew point. These measures can be confusing to people who are just trying to determine if the weather outside will feel comfortable. Both relate to the chemistry of water dissolving in air, but in different ways. In this video, Reactions decodes these weather terms to help you make sense of the forecast: .

By American Chemical Society - Friday, November 30, 2018 - Full Story

A bionic mushroom that generates electricity

A bionic mushroom that generates electricity
In the quest to replace fossil fuels, scientists are always on the lookout for alternative, environmentally friendly sources of energy. But who could have imagined a bionic mushroom that produces electricity? It sounds like something straight out of Alice in Wonderland, but researchers have now generated mushrooms patterned with energy-producing bacteria and an electrode network. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - Full Story

How is Leather Made?—VIDEO

How is Leather Made? -- VIDEO

By American Chemical Society - Friday, November 16, 2018 - Full Story

Powerful method probes small-molecule structures

Powerful method probes small-molecule structures
Small molecules — from naturally occurring metabolites and hormones to synthetic medicines and pesticides — can have big effects on living things. But for scientists to understand how the molecules work and how to design beneficial ones, they need to know the precise arrangement of atoms and chemical bonds. Now researchers have found a faster, simpler and potentially more reliable way to solve the structures of small molecules. They report their results in ACS Central Science.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, November 8, 2018 - Full Story

A bullet-proof heating pad

A bullet-proof heating pad
Sometimes nothing feels better on stiff, aching joints than a little heat. But many heating pads and wraps are rigid and provide uneven warmth, especially when the person is moving around. Researchers have now made a wearable heater by modifying woven Kevlar® fabric with nanowires that conduct and retain heat. They report their results in ACS’ journal Nano Letters.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, November 3, 2018 - Full Story

Questioning Medical Research

Medical Research
John Ioannidis first burst onto the national scene in 2005 with a groundbreaking paper titled “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False.” 1 His statistical analysis and logic are impeccable, and his paper has never been seriously refuted. Furthermore, he has had a tremendous impact: the paper has been viewed more than 2.5 million times.2

By Jack Dini - Sunday, October 28, 2018 - Full Story

Do astronauts need sunscreen? (VIDEO)

Do astronauts need sunscreen?

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, October 25, 2018 - Full Story

3D-printed lithium-ion batteries

3D-printed lithium-ion batteriesElectric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially available batteries. But researchers have developed a new method to 3D print lithium-ion batteries in virtually any shape. They report their results in ACS Applied Energy Materials.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - Full Story

WATCH: What makes tardigrades such great survivors

WATCH: What makes tardigrades such great survivors

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, October 11, 2018 - Full Story

Science, which is never wrong, knows everything—stumped by particles flying out of Antarctica’s ice

stumped by particles flying out of Antarctica's ice
Science is a wonderful discipline, a fascinating process by which we seek to understand what goes on throughout God’s creation. We’ve discovered and learned many things through science. We’ve also learned of new questions we wouldn’t have otherwise known to ask.

By Dan Calabrese - Monday, October 1, 2018 - Full Story

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator
Water covers most of the globe, yet many regions still suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. If scientists could efficiently and sustainably turn seawater into clean water, a looming global water crisis might be averted. Now, inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers have devised a solar steam generator that approaches 100 percent efficiency for the production of clean water. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 29, 2018 - Full Story

Ants surrender their venomous secrets

Ants surrender their venomous secrets
Venoms produced by snails, snakes, scorpions and spiders contain numerous bioactive compounds that could lead to therapeutic drugs or insect-specific pesticides. Yet little is known about venoms produced by insects, in part because each bug contains such a tiny amount. Researchers recently responded to this challenge by conducting one of the first intensive studies of ant venom. They have now published their findings in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 24, 2018 - Full Story

Sensors that are literally ‘music to one’s ears’ (video)

3,000-year-old African musical instrument
Researchers have found a new use for a 3,000-year-old African musical instrument: detecting toxic substances and counterfeit medications. The sensor, based on the mbira (pronounced “em-bir’-uh”) is inexpensive and easy to operate, allowing its use in developing regions, the researchers say.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 24, 2018 - Full Story

How silver nanoparticles cut odors (VIDEO)

How silver nanoparticles cut odors

WASHINGTON, — Trendy workout clothes may advertise that special silver nanoparticles embedded in the fabric will cut the sweaty odor that builds up from repeated gym visits. It turns out there’s some truth to these claims.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 22, 2018 - Full Story

Biodegradable plastic blends offer new options for disposal

Biodegradable plastic blends offer new options for disposal
Imagine throwing your empty plastic water bottle into a household composting bin that breaks down the plastic and produces biogas to help power your home. Now, researchers have taken an early step toward this futuristic scenario by showing that certain blends of bioplastics can decompose under diverse conditions. They report their results in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 10, 2018 - Full Story


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