Science-Technology

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Polymers pave way for wider use of recycled tires in asphalt

Polymers pave way for wider use of recycled tires in asphaltEach year, about 27 million tires end up in landfills, dumps and stockpiles, where they pose health and environmental hazards. These tires could get a second life as components of the roads they once traveled, but blends of ground tires and asphalt can be unstable. Now, researchers have identified polymer additives that increase the storage stability of asphalt rubber. They report their results in the ACS journal Energy & Fuels.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, February 20, 2019

‘Unclonable’ tag combats counterfeiters

'Unclonable' tag combats counterfeiters
Discovering that your new designer handbag or gold watch is a fake is costly and annoying, and counterfeit medical devices or drugs could have even more serious consequences. But seemingly as soon as manufacturers develop a new method to ensure product authenticity, counterfeiters find a way to outsmart it. Now, researchers have created an “unclonable” tag that can never be replicated, even by the manufacturer. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, February 14, 2019

5G Wireless Broadband and how (not) to Boil Eggs

5G Wireless Broadband and how (not) to Boil EggsThe new 5G wireless broadband technology that is said to be rolled out soon for wireless communication everywhere has some people concerned about potential health effects.

In my perception, that concern is not without thought—and not only for human health reasons.

In order to understand why, one has to review not just the numerous studies done about the safety of the current (4G) technology but also the technology of microwave ovens and traditional ways of cooking. Let’s begin with the latter.

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Thursday, February 14, 2019

How shaving cream works (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON — Whether you rock sideburns or baby-smooth legs, all shavers share one concern –– the threat of razor-sharp metal. But luckily, shaving cream packs the right chemistry to keep us looking good while protecting our sensitive skin. What is this fantastic foam in a can? Today, with the help of YouTuber Ms. Beautyphile, Reactions gets up close and personal with the chemistry of your bathroom’s most magical soap: .



By American Chemical Society - Sunday, February 3, 2019

What makes the deadly pufferfish so delectable

What makes the deadly pufferfish so delectable Some people consider pufferfish, also known as fugu, a delicacy because of its unique and exquisite flavor, which is perhaps seasoned by knowledge that consumption of the fish could be deadly. Now, researchers have identified the major compounds responsible for the taste of pufferfish, minus the thrill of living dangerously. They report their results in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Artificial bug eyes

Artificial bug eyes
Single lens eyes, like those in humans and many other animals, can create sharp images, but the compound eyes of insects and crustaceans have an edge when it comes to peripheral vision, light sensitivity and motion detection. That’s why scientists are developing artificial compound eyes to give sight to autonomous vehicles and robots, among other applications. Now, a report in ACS Nano describes the preparation of bioinspired artificial compound eyes using a simple low-cost approach.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, January 14, 2019

How compostable plastic works (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON—Due to the demands of eco-conscious consumers, manufacturers are making more and more disposable plastic products from compostable polylactic acid. However, there are a few things everyone should know before tossing these plastics in the compost bin. In this video, Reactions explains how polylactic acid becomes compost:

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By American Chemical Society - Friday, January 11, 2019

Should Santa wear a flame-retardant suit? (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON—Saint Nick faces a host of hazards during the holiday season, from the calories in cookies to the dying embers in your fireplace. A flame-retardant suit could save Santa from a seriously un-jolly circumstance. But many believe these molecules belong on the naughty list due to the potential risks they pose to human health. In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of flame retardants and asks whether Father Christmas should bother swapping out his suit:



By American Chemical Society - Friday, December 14, 2018

Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper

  Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper  
The image on this cell phone case can change because it was made with rewritable paper.

Even in this digital age, paper is still everywhere. Often, printed materials get used once and are then discarded, creating waste and potentially pollution. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of an easy-to-make “rewritable” paper that can be drawn or printed on over and over again. The messages can last more than half a year, compared to other rewritable papers whose messages fade after a few days or a few months.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, December 6, 2018

Why Antarctic fish don’t freeze to death (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON—The notothenioid fishes that inhabit the Antarctic Ocean have evolved an unusual adaptation to living in icy waters. Their blood contains antifreeze proteins that prevent ice from growing within the fishes’ bodies and actually lower the freezing temperature of their tissues. In this video, Reactions meets these bizarre animals:



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, December 6, 2018

Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions (video)

Human skin contains sensitive nerve cells that detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. To help robots and prosthetic devices attain these abilities, scientists are trying to develop electronic skins. Now researchers report a new method in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that creates an ultrathin, stretchable electronic skin, which could be used for a variety of human-machine interactions.



By American Chemical Society - Monday, December 3, 2018

California fire crews drink water pulled from thin air

  California fire crews drink water pulled from thin air  
A victim of Hurricane Michael in Florida receiving water from a Watergen unit, October 2018. Photo courtesy of Watergen USA

An emergency response vehicle (ERV) carrying an innovative Israeli machine that pulls pure drinking water directly out of ambient air is on its way to California, to provide hydration to police and firefighters dealing with the aftermath of two massive wildfires that have taken at least 87 lives and destroyed over 10,000 homes and businesses.

The vehicle and the GEN-350 atmospheric water generator were sent by Watergen USA, the American subsidiary of the Israeli company that invented the system.

By ISRAEL21c -- Abigail Klein Leichman- Friday, November 30, 2018

What’s the difference between relative humidity and dew point?

WASHINGTON—Meteorologists often report the amount of moisture in the air as relative humidity or dew point. These measures can be confusing to people who are just trying to determine if the weather outside will feel comfortable. Both relate to the chemistry of water dissolving in air, but in different ways. In this video, Reactions decodes these weather terms to help you make sense of the forecast: .



By American Chemical Society - Friday, November 30, 2018

A bionic mushroom that generates electricity

A bionic mushroom that generates electricity
In the quest to replace fossil fuels, scientists are always on the lookout for alternative, environmentally friendly sources of energy. But who could have imagined a bionic mushroom that produces electricity? It sounds like something straight out of Alice in Wonderland, but researchers have now generated mushrooms patterned with energy-producing bacteria and an electrode network. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, November 28, 2018

How is Leather Made?—VIDEO

WASHINGTON—The chemical process of tanning turns animal hides into durable, supple leather. Although this technology is thousands of years old, scientists are still trying to understand the exact chemical changes involved. In this video, Reactions explains how leather is made:



By American Chemical Society - Friday, November 16, 2018