WhatFinger

They could have soared like eagles

Unborn Baby Eagles


By —— Bio and Archives--January 20, 2019

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Unborn Baby Eagles
“Don’t fail to rescue those who are doomed to die. Don’t say, “I didn’t know it!”  God can read your mind. He watches each of us and knows our thoughts. And God will pay us back for what we do.” (Proverbs 24:11-12—Contemporary English Version)

Since 1973 when two women, prompted (some might say, used) by their activist radical women’s rights attorneys, challenged laws prohibiting abortions and won, more than 50 million unborn and nearly born babies have been killed.

.

Because of our abortion laws, millions of children will never grow up. Their families will never know them. They will never sit at the dinner table, be educated, grow up, marry, or work at a job. They will never become presidents, explorers, doctors, inventors, the person who discovers a cure for cancer or a cure for human hunger. They will remain just a statistic—one more faceless, nameless potential life that never was. They could have been someone; they could have been a treasure to their parents, a father or mother or sibling or grandparent some day. They could have led exemplary lives. They could have soared like eagles. But the Justices of the Supreme Court—ruled by man’s law and not by God’s—disregarded the obvious religious prohibition against harming the little children, and declared that the mother and her doctor may decide which babies live or die. The baby, in short, has no vote and The Law will not protect it.

Which reminds me of eagles.  The bald eagle and the golden eagle have now been removed from the endangered or threatened species list by the federal government.  This is, of course, wonderful news. I am all in favor of saving the eagles and all other species (including our own) from extinction.  In fact, our laws are so intent on protecting the eagle that simply injuring, molesting or destroying an eagle egg could cost you a serious criminal penalty, civil fines, and a year in the slammer. All for disturbing an egg.  The law takes this seriously.

Whatever else you do, don’t disturb an eagle egg. We go to great lengths to protect unborn baby eagles while they are vulnerable and in the first few weeks of their embryonic life.  In fact, the laws do more than that—they protect unborn eagles from conception to the end of life. That is how much we value eagle life.  So too, the plover.  In 2011,  I discussed the Missouri River with a United States Park Ranger who managed a stretch of the river near Yankton, South Dakota—my home state. I asked him why the government was holding back so much water at the Lewis and Clark Dam near Yankton.  “To protect the baby plover,” he replied. “If we let out too much water right now, the baby plover will drown and they won’t have a chance to fledge, because their parents build their nests next to the water.”  A noble goal I thought—protecting the baby plover. Imagine that…one of the largest rivers in America dammed up and held back for months because the federal government wants to protect baby birds. What lengths will we not go to in order to protect baby birds! We criminalize anyone who disturbs them and we hold back mighty waters so they do not drown.

The esteem in which we hold unborn baby eagles is remarkable. The protection which the law affords them is noble and inspiring.  If only unborn human babies had feathers…perhaps we would not kill them.

(i) Roe v. Wade, 410 U.S. 113 (1973);  Doe v. Bolton, 410 U.S. 179 (1973)
(ii) Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, 16 U.S.C.S.  Section 668 et seq.; Migratory Bird Treaty Act, 16 U.S.C.S. Section 703 et seq.


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William Kevin Stoos -- Bio and Archives | Comments

Copyright © 2017 William Kevin Stoos
William Kevin Stoos (aka Hugh Betcha) is a writer, book reviewer, and attorney, whose feature and cover articles have appeared in the Liguorian, Carmelite Digest, Catholic Digest, Catholic Medical Association Ethics Journal, Nature Conservancy Magazine, Liberty Magazine, Social Justice Review, Wall Street Journal Online and other secular and religious publications.  He is a regular contributing author for The Bread of Life Magazine in Canada. His review of Shadow World, by COL. Robert Chandler, propelled that book to best seller status. His book, The Woodcarver (]And Other Stories of Faith and Inspiration<strong>) © 2009, William Kevin Stoos (Strategic Publishing Company)—a collection of feature and cover stories on matters of faith—was released in July of 2009. It can be purchased though many internet booksellers including Amazon, Tower, Barnes and Noble and others. Royalties from his writings go to support the Carmelites. He resides in Wynstone, South Dakota.


“His newest book, <strong>The Wind and the Spirit (Stories of Faith and Inspiration)
” © 2011, is scheduled for release in the summer of 2011. All the author’s royalties go to support the Carmelite sisters.”


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