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Wynne probably didn’t mean to suggest carbon taxes have nothing to do with carbon emissions either

What did Kathleen Wynne mean by ‘old white people’?


By —— Bio and Archives--March 21, 2018

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What did Kathleen Wynne mean by ‘old white people’?
Ontario premier Kathleen Wynne seems to be in panic mode these days. She and her Liberal Party are low in the polls, occasionally dipping into “Elvis territory.” In other words the percentage of people willing to support the Liberals is about the same as those who think the King of Rock and Roll is still alive.

The election of Doug Ford as leader of the opposition PC Party seems to have driven Wynne further into a frenzy. When that happens to politicians they sometimes do the unfathomable—they blurt out the truth. Ford made it clear if he forms the government the PCs will do away with the carbon tax currently in the party’s platform. This led Wynne to say 40,000 government jobs will be lost without the revenue from the tax. Wynne admitted what we all know; the carbon tax has absolutely nothing to do with reducing carbon emissions and climate change. It is just a cash grab to fund, among other things, Ontario’s bloated civil service.

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Wynne’s Liberals and the NDP are engaged in a contest to try and outdo each other bribing taxpayers with their own money

Speaking to a group of Humber College students, many of whom were non-white, the premier urged them to go out and vote. She told the students, “If you don’t vote, then someone who looks like me is going to vote, some senior person, older than me, some white person.”

At first blush it seems the premier was simply engaged in white-bashing. Trashing white people, Christians and Jews to the extent it can be done without appearing too anti-Semitic is a favourite pastime of the left these days. She was just engaging in identity politics as the left also likes to do when they are devoid of anything constructive to say.

That is all well and good except for the fact she threw in age as well as race and this combination leads to another possible interpretation of the premier’s comments.

Age of course does become a factor in voting because young people lack the life experience of their elders. Many, snuggly ensconced in their parents’ warm basements have never even seen a hydro bill let alone have to pay one month after month. They can afford to be idealistic and love the thought governments exist to give people “free stuff” and make the world a happy place. Currently Wynne’s Liberals and the NDP are engaged in a contest to try and outdo each other bribing taxpayers with their own money.

The appeal of her government’s nanny state to young people is the reason she had one of her trained seals, MPP Arthur Potts, introduce a private members’ bill lowering the voting age to 16. (The one good thing about Potts introducing the bill is I live in his riding and get to directly vote against him.)

 

Wynne, like others on the left, love to say there is systemic racism in Ontario

Where Wynne’s comments were especially problematic is when she lumped these young people in with middle age and elderly non-whites. In combining both race and age, she seems to be suggesting older non-whites are as naïve as young people are. She is assuming these non-whites do not work, have never worked, and cannot survive without her government’s help. They do not have the same life experiences as their white contemporaries do. These black, brown and yellow people are just too backward to look after themselves like white people do.

Wynne, like others on the left, love to say there is systemic racism in Ontario. Yet she puts older non-whites in the same category as young people and children. Surely Wynne did not mean to suggest whites are superior to non-whites. But she probably didn’t mean to suggest carbon taxes have nothing to do with carbon emissions either.

Listen to Wynne’s comments here.


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Arthur Weinreb -- Bio and Archives | Comments

Arthur Weinreb is an author, columnist and Associate Editor of Canada Free Press. Arthur’s latest book, Ford Nation: Why hundreds of thousands of Torontonians supported their conservative crack-smoking mayor is available at Amazon. Racism and the Death of Trayvon Martin is also available at Smashwords. His work has appeared on Newsmax.com,  Drudge Report, Foxnews.com.

Older articles (2007) by Arthur Weinreb


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