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As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concerns

As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concerns
As technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology that by studying lake sediments they can construct a history of tellurium as it was deposited in the environment.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - Full Story

Science for Government Policy Should Be Transparent

Science for Government Policy Should Be Transparent
Suppose a progressive just woke up from a coma and you explained, “There is currently a battle between the Trump Administration and public health and environmental activists. One is favoring government proclamations and edicts issued on the basis of secret information, while the other favors transparency so outside parties can review the methods and data.” The progressive could be forgiven for thinking that the activists would surely be the ones favoring open access. And yet, the opposite situation is currently playing out, as critics blast the EPA’s new proposed rule that requires regulations to be based only on scientific findings that are derived from publicly available information.

By Institute for Energy Research - Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - Full Story

Weather, Climate, Carbon Dioxide and Global Warming.

Weather, Climate, Carbon Dioxide and Global Warming
There are three big drivers of weather for any place on Earth – the latitude, the local environment and solar system cycles.

The biggest weather factor is latitude – are you in the torrid, temperate or frigid zone? These climatic zones are defined by the intensity of heat delivered to Earth’s surface by the sun.


Is climate alarmist consensus about to shatter?

Climate Alarmist Consensus—About to Shatter?
On November 10, 1942, after British and Commonwealth forces defeated the Germans and Italians at the Second Battle of El Alamein, Winston Churchill told the British Parliament, “Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.”

By E. Calvin Beisner, Ph.D. - Tuesday, May 1, 2018 - Full Story

Renewables Generated 103 Percent of Portugal’s Electricity Consumption in March

Renewables Generated 103 Percent of Portugal’s Electricity Consumption in March
Portugal’s renewable electricity production (mostly from hydropower and wind energy) exceeded monthly consumption in March. The average renewable generation for the month exceeded 103.6 percent of consumption. According to the nation’s transmission system operator, renewable energy production reached 4,812 gigawatt hours, surpassing Portugal’s total electricity needs for March, which totalled 4,647 gigawatt hours. But that does not mean that Portugal’s electric system can rely solely on renewable energy. At least, some say, not until 2040—over 20 years from now—will that be able to happen in a cost effective way.

By Institute for Energy Research - Monday, April 30, 2018 - Full Story

Ending secret science at EPA

social cost of carbon
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has proposed to end the longstanding EPA practice of using secretive, often questionable, even deceptive science to support agency policy and regulatory initiatives. His proposed rules will ensure that any science underlying agency actions is transparent and publicly available for independent experts to examine and validate—or point out its flaws.

By Paul Driessen - Sunday, April 29, 2018 - Full Story

From “dirty” jeans to Pruitt’s “dirty laundry”

From dirty jeans to Pruitt's dirty laundry
Environmentalist bubble-browsers can’t seem to get their heads out of their pants. They’re more than happy to remove their britches in public (which most of us would rather not see), but don’t expect much if you ask them to examine their motive for revealing what’s best kept covered—doubtful it goes any deeper than exhibitionism.

By A. Dru Kristenev - Friday, April 27, 2018 - Full Story

A New Lithium War Is About To Begin

A New Lithium War Is About To Begin
It’s the modern gold rush. Around the world, the most sought-after mineral isn’t a precious metal, nor is it oil and gas…it’s lithium.

Lithium, or “white petroleum” as some call it, has become a crucial element in today’s high-tech economy.

By Oilprice.com -- Nick Cunningham- Thursday, April 26, 2018 - Full Story

Sunlight works against oil clean-up efforts

Sunlight works against oil clean-up efforts
Oil spills, whether minor leaks or major environmental disasters, are bound to happen. Chemical dispersants are one of the tools that can help mitigate the impact of such spills, but they become less effective as oil weathers in the environment. Now, one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology Letters that sunlight has a much greater impact than previously thought on the effectiveness of these dispersants.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - Full Story

Stemming the tide of ocean plastics

Stemming the tide of ocean plastics
As people in the developing countries become more affluent, they end up buying more plastics. But these areas often don’t have good waste management procedures in place, so a lot of that plastic eventually ends up in the ocean, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, April 23, 2018 - Full Story

Harvesting water from fog with harps (video)

Harvesting water from fog with harps (video)

As summertime draws near, some people around the U.S. will face annual water usage restrictions as water supplies become strained. But for those who live in arid climates year-round, water shortages are a constant concern. In these areas, residents must capitalize on even the smallest bit of moisture in the air. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a type of “harp” to harvest fresh water from fog.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, April 23, 2018 - Full Story

Pepper plant sops up personal care product antibiotic

Pepper plant sops up personal care product antibiotic
It sometimes can be hard to find toothpastes, soaps and other toiletries without antibiotics. Their popularity has caused an increase in environmental levels of antimicrobial substances, such as triclocarban (TCC), which end up in the water and soil used to grow crops. Scientists report in the ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that TCC and related molecules can end up in food, with potentially negative health effects.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, April 23, 2018 - Full Story

Coal is King in India and Elsewhere


India is going to use coal as its backbone energy for the next thirty years, is buying coal mines all around the world, and will double production by 2020 to a massive 1,500 million tons per annum. 1

By Jack Dini - Monday, April 23, 2018 - Full Story

Earth Day should Celebrate “Engines and Electricity”.

Earth Day should Celebrate Engines and Electricity
Most chapters of human history are defined by the tools and machines that were used.

In the Stone Age, the first tools were “green tools” – digging sticks, spears, boomerangs, bows and arrows made of wood; and axes, clubs, knives and grinders made of stone. These were all powered by human energy.

By Viv Forbes - Monday, April 23, 2018 - Full Story

Climate adaptation, reparation and restoration

Climate adaptation, reparation and restoration
This Earth Day (April 22) we need to ask whether environmentalism has gone completely bonkers.

Back in the 1970s, I skied Colorado’s cross-country and downhill slopes pretty regularly. Some years were incredible: many feet of snow as glorious to behold as to ski on. Other years, like 1977, I’d come around a bend on my XC skis, see nothing but rock in front of me, and just ditch.

By Paul Driessen - Sunday, April 22, 2018 - Full Story

One reason to celebrate Earth Day: It provides us with super clean natural gas!

One reason to celebrate Earth Day: It  provides us with super clean natural gas!
WASHINGTON, D.C. — It’s official.  U.S. natural gas production has reached record highs.  The federal Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports natural gas production for 2017 reached “the highest volume on record.”  The U.S. has led the world in natural gas production since 2009, thanks to technological breakthroughs that unlocked previously inaccessible energy reserves.

By Todd A. Snitchler - Thursday, April 19, 2018 - Full Story

Polar Bears Doing Well Say The Natives

Polar Bears Doing Well Say The Natives
Grim predictions of the imminent demise of polar bears have been touted since at least 2001.

Yet tales of doom and gloom about polar bears reflect what some people think might happen in the future, not what is happening right now. Currently, polar bears are doing just fine despite the low summer sea ice coverage they’ve experienced since 2007. In other words, there has been no global population decline as predicted: officially the numbers were 22,000-31,000 (or 26,500 average) in 2015 but about 28,500 when estimates published since then are included. 1

By Jack Dini - Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - Full Story

The Bullish And Bearish Case For Oil

The Bullish And Bearish Case For Oil
Oil prices could rise due to the “perfect storm of stagnant supply, geopolitical risk, and a harsh winter,” according to an April 12 note from Barclays.

Geopolitical events specifically could help keep Brent above $70 through April and May, which comes on the back of a substantial decline in oil inventories.

By Oilprice.com -- Nick Cunningham- Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - Full Story

Massachusetts Limits Gas Pipelines, Imports LNG from Russia Instead

Massachusetts Limits Gas Pipelines, Imports LNG from Russia Instead
Environmentalists are winning in Massachusetts by getting natural gas infrastructure projects shelved. Natural gas consumers in the state, however, are losing out because those pipelines would supply natural gas to consumers at a lower cost than imported liquefied natural gas (LNG)—some of which is coming from Russia through the Everett LNG terminal—the only LNG import terminal still operating in the lower 48.

By Institute for Energy Research - Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - Full Story

The double standards industry

The double standards industry
It’s a good thing environmentalists have double standards—or they wouldn’t have any standards at all.

Empire State legislators worry that anything above the current 0.0001% methane in Earth’s atmosphere will cause catastrophic climate change, and that pipelines will disturb wildlife habitats. So they oppose fracking for natural gas in New York and pipelines that would import the clean fuel from Pennsylvania.

By Paul Driessen - Monday, April 16, 2018 - Full Story