Science-Technology

WhatFinger

Pulling valuable metals from e-waste makes financial sense

Recovering gold, copper and other metals from e-waste is cheaper than mining these metals
Electronic waste — including discarded televisions, computers and mobile phones — is one of the fastest-growing waste categories worldwide. For years, recyclers have gleaned usable parts, including metals, from this waste stream. That makes sense from a sustainability perspective, but it’s been unclear whether it’s reasonable from an economic viewpoint. Now researchers report in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology that recovering gold, copper and other metals from e-waste is cheaper than obtaining these metals from mines.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 18, 2018

What is flame jetting? (video)

What is flame jetting? (video)
WASHINGTON — We know fuels like gasoline and alcohol can burn. But sometimes, when the conditions are just right, a hand-held container of fuel being poured near an ignition source can shoot out a ten-foot jet of flame. Flame jetting is extremely dangerous and has caused several deaths. In this video from Reactions, the bizarre phenomenon is explained with help from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives:



By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Robotics takes mass spec to the third dimension for forensics, pharma applications

Robotic Surface Analysis Mass Spectrometry
Within the past decade, many advancements have been made in the 3-D market from printing to movies. Now scientists report in ACS’ Analytical Chemistry that by combining a robotic arm and mass spectrometry, they can analyze the surface of irregularly shaped 3-D objects, potentially opening up new branches of forensics and pharmaceutics.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 4, 2018

New technology will enable computers to run 100x faster

New technology will enable computers to run 100x faster
Researchers have created technology that will enable our computers, text messages and phone calls to run 100 times faster through terahertz microchips.

Until now, the major challenges that stood in the way of creating the terahertz microchip were overheating and scalability. However, following three years of extensive research, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) physicist Uriel Levy and his team have shown proof of concept using flash memory technology.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Petrichor, the smell of rain (video)

WASHINGTON—The smell that accompanies a spring shower is so evocative that it has its own word: petrichor. Watch as Reactions explores the unique chemistry behind the smell of rain:



By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Browser and search engine team up to help you stay private on the internet

Vivaldi Technologies
“Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean that they aren’t out to get you.”

I don’t know, or care, who said that originally, but in this age of hacking and cyber corruption – and the deep state trying desperately to defeat the forces of light - it’s becoming increasingly clear that there appears to be folks out in cyberspace who don’t have your best interests in mind.

Indeed, you may have heard about how Facebook and Google have been revealed as corrupt data miners more interested in raking in cash and helping their fellow political travellers than in providing the benign platforms for the people they’ve purported to be.

By Jim Bray - Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Today is Yesterday’s Tomorrow

Today is Yesterday's Tomorrow
Science fiction has predicted many of today’s realities from cell phones to tablets. Many things that are today part of History like walking on the moon, organ transplants, and space stations were once flights of fancy.

Futurists build current events on a foundation of History to provide a launching pad for visions of what is to come. One of the most widely recognized Futurists is Alvin Toffler whose seminal works include Future Shock and The Third Wave. He is also the one who told us, “Change is not merely necessary to life - it is life.”

By Dr. Robert R. Owens - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

An eco-friendly alternative to recycling e-waste

An eco-friendly alternative to recycling e-waste
As consumers toss aside old cell phones, tablets and laptops to keep up with the latest technology, landfills are becoming full of the old devices. To address this buildup, scientists are attempting to recover valuable plastics from this electronic waste, or “e-waste.” Now, one group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they have found an eco-friendly alternative to current methods.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Super sniffer: Dog’s nose inspires new gas sensor materials

Super sniffer: Dog's nose inspires new gas sensor materials
It is well known that dogs have a better sense of smell than humans. For years, researchers have been trying to develop an artificial detector that is just as good as a canine’s nose. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano that they were able to mimic a dog’s sniffer with graphene-based nanoscrolls.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

The thousand-year-old egg (video)

WASHINGTON — Century eggs, or pidan, are a preserved food made by fermenting duck eggs in alkali. The green and black color of these eggs is not very appealing at first blush, and the smell is even worse. However, this Ming dynasty innovation effectively extended the shelf life of eggs and has been adopted as a beloved comfort food in China and throughout the world. Reactions explains the chemistry behind this unusual culinary offering:



By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, March 13, 2018

With a TENG, solar cells could work come rain or shine

With a TENG, solar cells could work come rain or shine
Despite the numerous advances in solar cells, one thing remains constant: cloudy, rainy conditions put a damper on the amount of electricity created. Now researchers reporting in the journal ACS Nano have developed hybrid solar cells that can generate power from raindrops.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, March 12, 2018

New graphene laser technique opens door for edible electronics

New graphene laser technique opens door for edible electronics
Electronics, the lifeblood of the modern world, could soon be part of our daily diet. In a study appearing in ACS Nano, scientists report that they have developed a way to write graphene patterns onto virtually any surface including food. They say the new technique could lay the groundwork for the edible electronics capable of tracing the progression of foods from farm to table, as well as detecting harmful organisms that can cause gastric distress.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Home theatre not rumbling enough? Here are some ways to tweak your system

Home theatre not rumbling enough? Here are some ways to tweak your system
You’ve shelled out good, after tax disposable income on a home theatre setup but instead of that room-rattling bass you’ve been promised you’re only getting a thin gruel oozing its way to your ears. Did you get ripped off?

That’s always a possibility, but even an inexpensive “home theatre in a box” can deliver good, room filling sound with chest thumping low frequency effects, so before you box it up again and toss it back across the counter at the retailer from whom you purchased it, take a while to do some tweaking to ensure it’s performing to the best of its capabilities.

By Jim Bray - Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Seeing the Light

Seeing the Light
The renowned Smithsonian Institute recently published an article “Scientists Create a New Form of Light by Linking Photons.” Yeah, a “New Form of Light”—really?

This revolutionary discovery is eloquently described by freelance journalist Marissa Fessenden in a post published as noted above. The research report she refers to has recently been  published in the Science magazine, authored by no less than ten authors from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Harvard University, Princeton University, National Institute of Standards and Technology and University of Maryland(NIST/UM) , and the University of Chicago, surely, all renowned institutes of higher learning and top notch research. The lead author, Dr. Qi-Yu Liang, currently hails from the NIST/UM.

By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Saturday, February 24, 2018

How chemistry can improve bargain hot cocoa (video)

WASHINGTON— Nobody really likes bargain hot cocoa powder. It’s lumpy, it’s too thin and it leaves scummy residue behind. But premium hot cocoa mix is too expensive for some imbibers. Fortunately, Reactions is here with some easy kitchen chemistry hacks to turn cheap cocoa mix into a satisfying cold weather pick-me-up:



By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, February 21, 2018

On the Fly

Are you waiting for delivery – of your EV, electric vehicle, SPACEX
Sorry to have to disappoint you (again). As the main-stream media reported everywhere, the top Roadster model, modified, and complete with a mannequin behind the wheel together with its miniature relative, was just sent into a circum-solar trajectory – never to be seen again by potential eager buyers on this planet. But it is really fast, travelling at a speed of 6,864 miles/hour!



By Dr. Klaus L.E. Kaiser - Saturday, February 17, 2018

Thermal blankets melt snow quickly

Thermal blankets melt snow quickly
Removing snow piled high in parking lots and along roadsides could soon be a far less tedious task. In a study appearing in ACS’ journal Langmuir, scientists report that they have tested sunlight-absorbing thermal blankets capable of melting snow three times faster than it would on its own. They say the blankets could slash snow-removal costs and reduce the risk of environmental contamination caused by soot and other products used to melt the white stuff.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, February 16, 2018

Replay software suite lets you replay, record, re-use audio and video from the Web

Applian Technology's Replay Capture Suite
What happens when you watch a particularly hot - or controversial - video on YouTube and just have to have it for yourself, forever? Or what happens when you want to listen to your favourite streaming talk show but have to be away from the computer while it’s on?

That’s the rationale behind Applian Technology’s Replay Capture Suite, a series of interacting apps that will do all that and much more. It’s a pretty impressive set of tools and it appears to work well.

The $79USD suite, individual modules of which are also available separately, includes tools for capturing video or music from any website, as well as conversion and editing tools you can use to file the serial numbers off your purloined programming. And that still isn’t all the suite can let you do!

By Jim Bray - Sunday, February 11, 2018

Chemtrails vs. contrails (video)

WASHINGTON, Feb. 6, 2018 — It’s easy to look at the white trail behind a jet aircraft and imagine all manner of chemicals raining down from above. However, airplane contrails are simply what happens when jet engines burn fuel. In this video, Reactions explains the straightforward chemistry of contrails: https://youtu.be/ZonPvpgcBc0.



By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Getting ready for the summer sun with ‘green’ sunscreens

Getting ready for the summer sun with 'green' sunscreens
Although it’s been a tough winter for many people in the U.S., summer is coming. And that means backyard barbeques, fun on the beach and, of course, slathering on sunscreen. But one particular environmentally friendly sunscreen ingredient has been difficult to obtain — that ingredient, shinorine, could only be harvested from nature. Scientists now report in ACS Synthetic Biology the laboratory production of that compound.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, February 5, 2018

Skin-inspired coating that’s as hard as teeth and can heal itself

Skin-inspired coating that's as hard as teeth and can heal itself
Self-healing smart coatings could someday make scratches on cell phones a thing of the past. But researchers often have to compromise between strength and the ability to self-repair when developing these materials. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano the development of a smart coating that is as hard as tooth enamel on the outside but can heal itself like skin can.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, February 5, 2018

The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage

The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage
From popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. But little is known about the chemistry behind the bubbles. Now, one group sheds some light on how carbonation can affect the creaminess and smoothness of beverages, as reported in ACS’ The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, February 5, 2018

Whiskey’s Complex Chemistry

Whiskey's Complex Chemistry
Whiskeys contain hundreds of compounds, including fatty acids, esters, alcohols and aldehydes, in a wide range of concentrations. The most important flavors in a whiskey come from the raw materials, the distillation process, and the maturation. 1

Chemist Thomas Collins and his team have identified about 4,000 unique compounds in 70 American whiskeys. 2

Whiskeys come in different variants (scotch, bourbon, rye, and so on) but are all essentially produced with just three simple ingredients; water, grain, and yeast. As part of the process, distillate is transferred into charred oak barrels for aging, where flavors such as vanilla, coconut and butterscotch are extracted into the whiskey. 3

By Jack Dini - Sunday, February 4, 2018

Algorithm identifies vulnerable people during natural disasters

Algorithm identifies vulnerable people during natural disasters
A new algorithm developed at the University of Waterloo will help first responders and home care providers better help the elderly during natural disasters.

According to the World Health Organization, older adults who live at home face disproportionally high fatality rates during natural disasters as evidenced by Hurricane Katrina where 71 per cent of the deaths resulting from that disaster involved people over 60 years of age.

By Waterloo - Saturday, February 3, 2018

New technique can capture images of ultrafast energy-time entangled photon pairs

Jean-Phillipe MacLean works in his lab
Scientists at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo have captured the first images of ultrafast photons that are energy-time entangled.

The new technique will have direct applications for quantum cryptography and communication protocols, including the possibility for establishing highly secure communication channels over long distances.

By Waterloo - Thursday, February 1, 2018

Gallium and the history of the periodic table (video)

WASHINGTON — Some chemists might see the periodic table of elements as a holy testament to the power of science. However, when it first debuted, it was a different kind of holey, and its journey to classroom walls everywhere had a whole lot of bumps. Watch as Reactions digs into the history of the periodic table with the help of a vanishing spoon, a man named after a rooster, and a bearded Russian



By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Lab-grown horns and tusks could stop poaching — or not

Lab-grown horns and tusks could stop poaching — or not
Scientists are making mimics of rhino horns and elephant tusks, hoping to drive down the prices of these items on the black market and discourage poaching. But many conservation groups argue that it could have the opposite effect, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, January 25, 2018

Pearly material for bendable heating elements (video)

The iridescent shimmer of a string of pearls may one day be more than pretty adornment. Scientists now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a hybrid material consisting of imitation pearl combined with silver nanowires that works as a heater, with the added benefit of high flexibility, suggesting a potential role in wearable devices.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, January 25, 2018

A step toward ridding register receipts of BPA


Although the U.S and other countries have banned or restricted the use of bisphenol A (BPA) because of environmental and health concerns, it is still used in thermally printed receipts and labels. Now researchers report in a study in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research that they have developed potentially safer polymers that could replace BPA for printed papers.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, January 19, 2018

Scaling to new heights with gecko-inspired adhesive

Scaling to new heights with gecko-inspired adhesive
Some animals, such as geckos, can easily climb up walls and across ceilings. But currently, no material exists that allows everyday people to scale walls or transverse ceilings as effortlessly. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces a dry adhesive that could someday make it easier to defy gravity.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, January 17, 2018

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