Medical and Health Pages

Health and Medicine, Cancer, Weight loss, Vitamins, Healthy Living, Surgery, Alternative Medicine, Health News

Old Health and Medicine Articles from 2007 and Before

“Inflammaging”: The Dr. Jekyll Reaction

Inflammaging: The Dr. Jekyll Reaction
This week I’ve learned a new word, “inflammaging”. Researchers at the University of California use it in a report that claims chronic inflammation has a profound effect on how we age, and what diseases we develop.

No one can go through life without experiencing the red, warm sensation of an injury or infection. But none see the immune cells rushing to the site to release a variety of chemicals to combat it. Without this immune response we would die.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, September 17, 2018 - Full Story

Monitor your metabolism on the phone with a single breath

Identical twins Michal and Merav Mor have more than looks in common: both earned PhDs in physiology at Ben-Gurion University, both compete in triathlons, both are health researchers and mothers.

Wanting to manage their nutrition scientifically, the Mor sisters came across a metric called respiratory quotient (RQ), the ratio of carbon dioxide (CO2) to oxygen (O2) in the breath. Measuring RQ after sleeping, eating or working out reveals whether the body is producing energy from fat or carbohydrates.

By ISRAEL21c - Thursday, September 13, 2018 - Full Story

Moving forward with mRNA medicines

Moving forward with mRNA medicines
In cells, ribosomes translate messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. And in the nascent field of mRNA therapeutics, researchers and investors are hoping to translate mRNA drugs from the lab to the medicine cabinet. Until now, the mRNA firm Moderna Therapeutics has been secretive about its technology, but now the company is opening up about its progress and challenges, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 10, 2018 - Full Story

A pill for delivering biomedical micromotors

A pill for delivering biomedical micromotors
Using tiny micromotors to diagnose and treat disease in the human body could soon be a reality. But keeping these devices intact as they travel through the body remains a hurdle. Now in a study appearing in ACS Nano, scientists report that they have found a way to encapsulate micromotors into pills. The pill’s coating protects the devices as they traverse the digestive system prior to releasing their drug cargo.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 10, 2018 - Full Story

What a Horrible Way to Start the Day!

research has proven alcohol makes platelets more slippery, less likely to clot, resulting in a fatal heart attack. It also dilates arteries, increases the good cholesterol and decreases fibrinogen to decrease the risk of a coronary death
The first thing I do every morning is read the newspaper. This AM I should have stayed in bed. The headline read, “No amount of alcohol is safe.” The report claimed to be one of the largest studies of alcohol consumption that’s ever been done. To make my day worse, the litany of alcohol problems was reported in one of the worlds most respected medical journals, The Lancet. So, should I be hung up by my thumbs, pour chardonnay down the drain, nail my bar doors shut, then repent my sins of writing for years that moderate drinking is medically beneficial?

But, in a world loaded with alarmist headlines and falsehoods, is this study “The Holy Grail” of Alcohol? First, it’s a large study and studies of this magnitude require a huge amount of statistics. And, as one of the most brilliant professors at The Harvard Medical School once remarked, “If anything has to be proven by statistics, it’s usually wrong.” I say amen to that and hope he’s right.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, September 10, 2018 - Full Story

Tune-Up Your Heart in 30 Days

The 30-Day Heart Tune-Up
Have I been missing a vital remedy to maintain a healthy heart? I wondered if that was the case when I read an article in LifeExtension titled, “The 30-Day Heart Tune-Up.” The author, Dr. Steven Masley, is a Fellow of both The American Heart Association and The American Academy of Nutrition. He has   devoted his career to heart disease and aging. So how does his treatment differ from that of other cardiologists?

Masley reports that most doctors rely on lowering blood cholesterol and blood pressure to prevent heart disease. He says this is a boon for Big Pharma, but not necessarily for patients. He admits that, although statin drugs are needed in some instances, they increase the risk of diabetes.  Unfortunately, statins also result in weight gain and, by lowering testosterone, reduce sexual pleasure.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Tuesday, September 4, 2018 - Full Story

Constipation: There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute

Constipation: There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute
Why must humans be so foolish and reach for laxatives when there’s a natural, safe, and inexpensive way to treat constipation and stop grunting? Barnum and Bailey, the circus promoters, were right when they said, “There’s a sucker born every minute.” In this case it’s the suckers who fall easy prey to T.V ads that preach health benefits of laxatives.

I realize that at a dinner party one is more inclined to talk about cholesterol numbers than frequency of bowel movements. But chronic grunting with BMs is not just an annoyance. It’s also associated with increased risk of hemorrhoids, and may be related to diverticulosis, small hernias of the large bowel which lead to inflammation. It’s also a sign of faulty dietary habits that result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart attack.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Wednesday, August 29, 2018 - Full Story

How drug expiration dates work (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON — We’ve all seen the expiration dates on prescription and over-the-counter medications. What’s less obvious to us as consumers is how these dates are determined and to what extent medicines actually go bad. In this video,



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, August 23, 2018 - Full Story

Advanced eye drops may allow you to chuck your glasses

Advanced eye drops may allow you to chuck your glasses
Would you rather wear glasses or contact lenses, have laser surgery, or put drops in your eyes to see well? Consumers are starting to demand the third option, as new scientific advances have made corrective eye drops possible.

This is big business: A couple of years ago, pharma giant Novartis acquired a company developing a topical treatment for age-related farsightedness (presbyopia), while others are experimenting with eye drops to dissolve cataracts.

By ISRAEL21c - Thursday, August 23, 2018 - Full Story

When Are Heart Stents Lifesaving? When Not?

When Are Heart Stents Lifesaving? When Not?
Every year over 300,000 North Americans have a stent implanted to increase the flow of blood to heart’s muscle. Stents have been inserted for decades because of cardiologists’ concern that, without a stent, a heart attack may occur. Or, a coronary attack may have already caused angina, due to inadequate blood supply. Now, a study published in the medical journal, The Lancet, reports that some stents are life-saving, while others could have been avoided.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, August 20, 2018 - Full Story

Oral delivery of nanoparticles

Oral delivery of nanoparticlesNanoparticles show great promise as diagnostic tools and drug delivery agents. The tiny particles, which scientists can modify with drugs, dyes or targeting molecules, can travel in the circulation and squeeze through small spaces into cells and tissues. But until now, most nanoparticles had to be injected into the bloodstream because they weren’t absorbed well orally. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have modified nanoparticles to improve their uptake in the gastrointestinal tract.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, August 16, 2018 - Full Story

Marijuana; Did It Cure My Neck Pain?

Marijuana; Did It Cure My Neck Pain?
Is marijuana as good as its reputation for treating painful conditions? Many years ago I suffered a neck injury in Japan which resulted in chronic pain. So I decided to try medical marijuana as painkillers, acupuncture, chiropractic treatment, and massage have had no effect. So what has happened?

During my first visit to the marijuana clinic I was surprised when asked to provide a urine specimen to prove I was not taking illegal drugs. I’m 94, a doctor, have lots of gray hair, walk with a cane, and was tired after fighting Toronto traffic. So I asked the receptionist, “Do I really look like an addict?” This tack didn’t work. I did as I was told. But what a waste of taxpayer’s money because some people are dishonest!  It’s costing millions.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, August 13, 2018 - Full Story


Ingenious upcycling turns discarded medical device into water filter

NUFiltration’s water recycling technology for greenhouses. Photo courtesy of NUFiltration
Every year across the world, more than 250 million dialysis filters are thrown away after only a single use cleansing a kidney patient’s blood of toxins. What if those filters could be recycled for a new use, wondered Tel Aviv University Faculty of Medicine Prof. Yoram Lass.

Could a medical filter that can remove even the slightest unwanted particle from human blood also work for, say, water purification?

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, August 1, 2018 - Full Story


New study offers hope of recovery from spinal-cord injury

New study offers hope of recovery from spinal-cord injury
An Israeli study shows great promise for improving the outcome of spinal-cord injuries, which often cause permanent changes in strength, sensation and other body functions.

In experiments with mice, scientists from Tel Aviv University found that injecting a potent enzyme hours after spinal injury can put the brakes on a cascade of pathological events responsible for neuronal death, such as inflammation and scarring.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, August 1, 2018 - Full Story

New sweet protein holds out hope for diabetics

New sweet protein holds out hope for diabetics
Ninety-nine percent of all fruits in the world derive their sweetness from sugar. But there are a dozen or so fruits that grow along the equatorial belt that contain a sweet protein, rather than a sugar.

What if that protein could be turned into a commercial product? Proteins used as a sweetener would have significant advantage over added sugar: they’re digested by the body just like any other protein in the GI tract, they don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels, they steer clear of your liver, don’t burden your kidneys, nor do they affect the microbiome in the same way as sugar.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, August 1, 2018 - Full Story

Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births

Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births
More than one in 10 babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to the World Health Organization. Now scientists report in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering that they have developed an organ-on-a-chip that could help explain why. The device, which replicates the functions of a key membrane in the placenta, could lead to a better understanding of how bacterial infections can promote preterm delivery. It could also lead to new treatments for this condition.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 1, 2018 - Full Story

Prostate Cancer; Updated Advice for the PSA Test

Prostate Cancer; Updated Advice for the PSA Test
What’s a man to do? Equally important, what’s a doctor to advise when the PSA test is reported elevated? Or should men even be screened for this test? During the last 10 years there’s been considerable flip-lopping about it. Now a large study from the United Kingdom, reported in The Journal of the American Medical Association has new recommendations about PSA testing.

First, this shocking finding. The study showed that men who take the PSA test are just as likely to die of prostate cancer as those who do not have the test! Moreover, some men who do take a PSA are exposed to unnecessary treatment and develop complications that are very annoying.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, July 30, 2018 - Full Story

Cannabidiol: Hope or hype?

Cannabidiol: Hope or hype?
Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the major phytochemicals in marijuana, has become a popular ingredient in dietary supplements, beauty products and beverages, with claims that the compound improves health and treats ailments ranging from insomnia to cancer. Although research on CBD is accelerating, medical evidence is still lacking for many of these claims, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, July 26, 2018 - Full Story