Health and Medicine

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Can Stem Cell Injections Replace Hip and Knee Surgery?

Can Stem Cell Injections Replace Hip and Knee Surgery?

What should you do if the doctor says, “You need a hip or knee replacement due to severe arthritis? The time – honoured treatment has been a major operation to replace the injured joint. This may still be the best option for some patients. But how many of these joints could be repaired by stem cell injections, thereby saving the potential complications of surgery?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 29, 2018

New clinical protocol after general surgery cuts opioid prescribing in half

New clinical protocol after general surgery cuts opioid prescribing in half,
In recent years deaths from opioid overdoses have become one of the most common injury-related deaths in North America. The continent also has the highest per capita rate of opioid prescription in the world.

Recognizing the role that opioid prescribing plays in the national opioid crisis, a team of researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University have developed a new clinical protocol called STOP Narcotics. A study demonstrating the efficacy of their protocol is being presented at the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress in Boston, Massachusetts on October 24.

By News on the Net - Thursday, October 25, 2018

What You May Not Know About Vaccines

What You May Not Know About Vaccines
Every year readers ask me if I get flu shots. I reply, I don’t. I rely on high daily doses of vitamin C to build up my immune system. But I may be wrong. So, I’ve sought the opinion of experts in the field. Their primary message is that informed consent is vital.

Most people believe vaccines would not be advised unless researchers and doctors deemed them safe. But I’ve often stressed, there’s no such thing as 100 percent safe surgery. The same is true of vaccines. That’s why 3.6 billion dollars has been awarded to families due to the complications of vaccines.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 22, 2018

Catholic Medical Association Speaks Out Against Fellow Medical Organization’s Decision to Take a “Ne

Medical Organization's Decision to Take a Neutral Stance on Physician-Assisted Suicide
PHILADELPHIA, PA—The Catholic Medical Association (CMA) today expressed deep disappointment and concern over the American Academy of Family Physicians’ (AAFP) decision to officially take a “neutral stance” on physician-assisted suicide. The move marks a shift in the American medical communities overall long and deeply held opposition to PAS.

“It is quite startling that the AAFP would be so diametrically opposed to the medical communities historical and long-standing opposition against physician-assisted suicide. It is in direct violation of the “do no harm” Hippocratic Oath. We at the CMA are dedicated to preserving life from conception (not birth) to natural death and will continue to remain staunchly opposed to any form of assisted suicide. It goes against natural law,” said CMA President Peter T. Morrow, MD.

By Catholic Medical Association - Thursday, October 18, 2018

Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney

Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney
There just aren’t enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kidney with the potential to make dialysis more convenient, comfortable and effective.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, October 17, 2018

A Healthy Lifestyle Adds 12 to 14 Years of Life

A Healthy Lifestyle Adds 12 to 14 Years of Life
What results in good health and longevity? I’ve said for years that it’s good genes, good lifestyle and good luck. But since we can’t choose our parents, or know what fate holds in store for us, we must treat lifestyle with tender, loving care.  Now, a report in the publication, Circulation, proves that a sound lifestyle adds 12 to 14 more years to life.

Two epidemiological studies of health professionals involved 120,000 men and women. This group was followed for 34 years. The study concluded that for people over 50 who had never smoked, exercised daily, had good dietary habits, a moderate use of alcohol, and maintained a healthy weight, ended up the winners.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 15, 2018

Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments

Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments
For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It’s hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now in a study appearing in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are released. This visual indicator could help eye doctors and patients readily determine whether these medications are where they should be.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, October 12, 2018

Natural Remedies and Illogical Attacks

Natural Remedies and Illogical Attacks
Break a law and you end up in jail. “Ignorance of the law is no excuse” it’s said. So should ignorance of medical facts excuse anyone? Time and time again so-called medical experts publish illogical reports without repercussion. Recently, a physician stated publicly, “There is no case for vitamin supplementation in normal, healthy, non-pregnant adults who are receiving the recommended daily intake of nutrients”. But is this medical fact or fiction?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Thursday, October 11, 2018


A better system for monitoring unstable blood pressure

A better system for monitoring unstable blood pressure
VitalMiner, a new software system to measure hemodynamic instability – unstable blood pressure – in intensive-care patients is hailed as a potential lifesaver by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, where it is being piloted.

“Earlier prediction of physiological deterioration of patients by using ‘smart’ monitoring software and machine learning algorithms will save lives and enable better informed resuscitation of the critically ill and injured,” said Cincinnati Children’s Hospital’s Prof. Victor F. Garcia, founding director of the hospital’s trauma services and a professor of surgery and pediatrics.

By ISRAEL21c - Sunday, October 7, 2018

Artificial sweeteners are poisoning your gut

Artificial sweeteners are poisoning your gut
FDA-approved artificial sweeteners and sport supplements are toxic to digestive gut microbes, according to a new paper published in the journal Molecules by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) in Israel and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.


The collaborative study indicated relative toxicity of six artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, saccharine, neotame, advantame, and acesulfame potassium-k) and 10 sport supplements containing these artificial sweeteners. The bacteria in the digestive system became toxic when exposed to concentrations of only one milligram per milliliter of these substances.

By ISRAEL21c - Sunday, October 7, 2018

Contact lenses for the nose that may help you lose weight

Contact lenses for the nose that may help you lose weight
Some years ago, Adva Beck experienced an “aha” moment when she bit into her favorite fruit, a peach, and quickly discarded it because her stuffy nose prevented her from tasting it properly.

She didn’t have any background in biology or medicine but the phenomenon intrigued her and she started to study scientific literature about how smell affects appetite and weight.

By ISRAEL21c - Sunday, October 7, 2018

Gallstones: For Surgery or the Crematorium?

Gallstones: For Surgery or the Crematorium?
What should you do if you are diagnosed with gallstones? Today, 10 percent of North Americans share this medical problem. For some patients surgery is the prudent choice. But now, a report from the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA), shows that, in some cases, leaving gallstones to the crematorium can prevent serious complications and even death.

In 1991 Dr. Joacques Perissat at the University of Bordeau, in France, removed a gallbladder by laparoscopic (keyhole) surgery. This innovation provided a huge advantage for patients from a technical standpoint. But is it foolproof?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 1, 2018

Protecting probiotics from the stomach


The small intestine is a hotbed of microbial activity and a target of probiotic treatments for diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, among other conditions. To make it to the intestine, though, probiotics must first pass through the stomach, a hostile acidic environment that can kill these beneficial bacteria. Now, scientists report in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering the development of a protective gel sphere that may offer probiotics a safer route.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 29, 2018

‘Paintable’ chemotherapy shrinks skin tumors in mice

'Paintable' chemotherapy shrinks skin tumors in mice
Skin acts as the first line of defense against pathogens and other harmful material from outside the body. Yet this barrier also excludes some beneficial drugs that could treat skin diseases. Now, researchers have taken the first steps in developing a chemotherapy for melanoma that can be “painted” directly on the skin, rather than injected or taken orally. They report their results in ACS Nano.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 29, 2018

Compound improves social interaction in autism mouse model

Compound improves social interaction in autism mouse model
Children with autism often find social interactions awkward, leaving them isolated. Now in a study appearing in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, scientists report that they have discovered a first-of-its-kind compound that promotes social interaction among laboratory mice that display autistic traits. The finding could lead to the development of drugs capable of improving social behaviors in those who have autism.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 29, 2018

Harmful bacteria thrived in post-Hurricane Harvey floodwaters

Harmful bacteria thrived in post-Hurricane Harvey floodwaters
Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017, bringing more than 50 inches of rain and extreme flooding to the city of Houston. In addition to wreaking havoc on buildings and infrastructure, urban floodwaters harbor hidden menaces in the form of bacteria that can cause disease. Now, researchers have surveyed the microbes that lurked in Houston floodwaters, both inside and outside of homes. They report their results in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 29, 2018

Green tea compound helps siRNA slip inside cells

Green tea compound helps siRNA slip inside cells

Drinking green tea has been linked to health benefits ranging from cardiovascular disease prevention to weight loss. Although many of these claims still need to be verified in the clinic, an antioxidant in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) appears to have beneficial effects in cells and animals. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for EGCG: sneaking therapeutic RNAs into cells. They report their results in ACS Central Science.

By American Chemical Society - Saturday, September 29, 2018

Travelling Anywhere? If So, Don’t Believe These Myths

Travelling Anywhere? If So, Don’t Believe These Myths
What’s the worst of times when travelling? It’s when you’re sitting on a bus tour 100 miles from the next stop and you begin to suffer the bowel spasms of traveller’s diarrhea. If the worst scenario happens, it’s a moment you will never forget. But this common risk, and the chance of acquiring other infections, can be decreased by ridding yourself of several travellers’ myths.

Myth: Only in the Amazon jungle do you have to worry about mosquito-transmitted diseases.

Fact: That’s not so. In the jungle, mosquitoes spread disease to humans by biting infected monkeys. In a cafe in Paris, Rome or Istanbul, mosquitoes infect you after biting infected humans.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, September 24, 2018

Sen. Rick Santorum: American Healthcare Through the Eyes of a Dad with a Special Child

Sen. Rick Santorum: American Healthcare Through the Eyes of a Dad with a Special Child
DALLAS, TX—The Catholic Medical Association (CMA) welcomes Senator Rick Santorum as this year’s conference keynote speaker. The staunch pro-life leader will candidly share his family’s personal story regarding his 7th and youngest child Bella’s life-threatening condition. Now 10, Bella was born with Trisomy 18, a rare chromosomal abnormality. Only half of those born with it survive a week; fewer than 1 in 10 make it to their first birthday.

By Catholic Medical Association - Saturday, September 22, 2018

“Inflammaging”: The Dr. Jekyll Reaction

Inflammaging: The Dr. Jekyll Reaction
This week I’ve learned a new word, “inflammaging”. Researchers at the University of California use it in a report that claims chronic inflammation has a profound effect on how we age, and what diseases we develop.

No one can go through life without experiencing the red, warm sensation of an injury or infection. But none see the immune cells rushing to the site to release a variety of chemicals to combat it. Without this immune response we would die.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, September 17, 2018

Monitor your metabolism on the phone with a single breath

Identical twins Michal and Merav Mor have more than looks in common: both earned PhDs in physiology at Ben-Gurion University, both compete in triathlons, both are health researchers and mothers.

Wanting to manage their nutrition scientifically, the Mor sisters came across a metric called respiratory quotient (RQ), the ratio of carbon dioxide (CO2) to oxygen (O2) in the breath. Measuring RQ after sleeping, eating or working out reveals whether the body is producing energy from fat or carbohydrates.

By ISRAEL21c - Thursday, September 13, 2018

Moving forward with mRNA medicines

Moving forward with mRNA medicines
In cells, ribosomes translate messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. And in the nascent field of mRNA therapeutics, researchers and investors are hoping to translate mRNA drugs from the lab to the medicine cabinet. Until now, the mRNA firm Moderna Therapeutics has been secretive about its technology, but now the company is opening up about its progress and challenges, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 10, 2018

A pill for delivering biomedical micromotors

A pill for delivering biomedical micromotors
Using tiny micromotors to diagnose and treat disease in the human body could soon be a reality. But keeping these devices intact as they travel through the body remains a hurdle. Now in a study appearing in ACS Nano, scientists report that they have found a way to encapsulate micromotors into pills. The pill’s coating protects the devices as they traverse the digestive system prior to releasing their drug cargo.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 10, 2018

What a Horrible Way to Start the Day!

research has proven alcohol makes platelets more slippery, less likely to clot, resulting in a fatal heart attack. It also dilates arteries, increases the good cholesterol and decreases fibrinogen to decrease the risk of a coronary death
The first thing I do every morning is read the newspaper. This AM I should have stayed in bed. The headline read, “No amount of alcohol is safe.” The report claimed to be one of the largest studies of alcohol consumption that’s ever been done. To make my day worse, the litany of alcohol problems was reported in one of the worlds most respected medical journals, The Lancet. So, should I be hung up by my thumbs, pour chardonnay down the drain, nail my bar doors shut, then repent my sins of writing for years that moderate drinking is medically beneficial?

But, in a world loaded with alarmist headlines and falsehoods, is this study “The Holy Grail” of Alcohol? First, it’s a large study and studies of this magnitude require a huge amount of statistics. And, as one of the most brilliant professors at The Harvard Medical School once remarked, “If anything has to be proven by statistics, it’s usually wrong.” I say amen to that and hope he’s right.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, September 10, 2018

Tune-Up Your Heart in 30 Days

The 30-Day Heart Tune-Up
Have I been missing a vital remedy to maintain a healthy heart? I wondered if that was the case when I read an article in LifeExtension titled, “The 30-Day Heart Tune-Up.” The author, Dr. Steven Masley, is a Fellow of both The American Heart Association and The American Academy of Nutrition. He has   devoted his career to heart disease and aging. So how does his treatment differ from that of other cardiologists?

Masley reports that most doctors rely on lowering blood cholesterol and blood pressure to prevent heart disease. He says this is a boon for Big Pharma, but not necessarily for patients. He admits that, although statin drugs are needed in some instances, they increase the risk of diabetes.  Unfortunately, statins also result in weight gain and, by lowering testosterone, reduce sexual pleasure.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Constipation: There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute

Constipation: There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute
Why must humans be so foolish and reach for laxatives when there’s a natural, safe, and inexpensive way to treat constipation and stop grunting? Barnum and Bailey, the circus promoters, were right when they said, “There’s a sucker born every minute.” In this case it’s the suckers who fall easy prey to T.V ads that preach health benefits of laxatives.

I realize that at a dinner party one is more inclined to talk about cholesterol numbers than frequency of bowel movements. But chronic grunting with BMs is not just an annoyance. It’s also associated with increased risk of hemorrhoids, and may be related to diverticulosis, small hernias of the large bowel which lead to inflammation. It’s also a sign of faulty dietary habits that result in obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart attack.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Wednesday, August 29, 2018

How drug expiration dates work (VIDEO)

WASHINGTON — We’ve all seen the expiration dates on prescription and over-the-counter medications. What’s less obvious to us as consumers is how these dates are determined and to what extent medicines actually go bad. In this video,



By American Chemical Society - Thursday, August 23, 2018

Advanced eye drops may allow you to chuck your glasses

Advanced eye drops may allow you to chuck your glasses
Would you rather wear glasses or contact lenses, have laser surgery, or put drops in your eyes to see well? Consumers are starting to demand the third option, as new scientific advances have made corrective eye drops possible.

This is big business: A couple of years ago, pharma giant Novartis acquired a company developing a topical treatment for age-related farsightedness (presbyopia), while others are experimenting with eye drops to dissolve cataracts.

By ISRAEL21c - Thursday, August 23, 2018

When Are Heart Stents Lifesaving? When Not?

When Are Heart Stents Lifesaving? When Not?
Every year over 300,000 North Americans have a stent implanted to increase the flow of blood to heart’s muscle. Stents have been inserted for decades because of cardiologists’ concern that, without a stent, a heart attack may occur. Or, a coronary attack may have already caused angina, due to inadequate blood supply. Now, a study published in the medical journal, The Lancet, reports that some stents are life-saving, while others could have been avoided.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, August 20, 2018

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