American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

‘Terminator’-like liquid metal moves and stretches in 3D space (video)

Mar 20, 2019 — American Chemical Society

In the blockbuster Terminator movie franchise, an evil robot morphs into different human forms and objects and oozes through narrow openings, thanks to its “liquid-metal” composition. Although current robots don’t have these capabilities, the technology is getting closer with the development of new liquid metals that can be manipulated in 3D space with magnets. Reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, the materials could someday find applications in soft robotics. Watch them in action here.




Sniffing out Parkinson’s disease

Mar 20, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to progressive brain cell death and extensive loss of motor function. Despite much research being conducted on this disease, there are no definitive diagnostic tests currently available. Now, researchers report the identification of compounds that make up the signature odor of the disease with the help an individual who can detect Parkinson’s through smell. They report their findings in ACS Central Science.

 


Fingerprints, revisited

Mar 20, 2019 — American Chemical Society

For more than a century, forensic scientists have linked criminals to crime scenes through the distinctive loops and whorls on their fingertips. But now, researchers are moving beyond simple pattern comparisons to glean more information from fingerprints. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, chemical analysis and DNA techniques could help identify criminals whose prints are too smudged to make a visual match.


Powering devices — with a desk lamp?

Mar 20, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Batteries power most of our devices, and even some cars. But researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a step toward running electronic devices in homes and offices on the light coming from lamps scattered around the room. The team developed special light harvesters, like those used for solar power, optimized to produce energy from ambient indoor lighting.


Are we running out of helium (VIDEO)?

Mar 14, 2019 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Did you realize that just like certain animals here on Earth, there are endangered elements, too? For example, we’re constantly losing helium, a gas that defies gravity and escapes our atmosphere into space. This incredible element is in high demand all over the globe. It’s also way too expensive to create in the laboratory, and that’s bad news for more than just your birthday party! This week on Reactions, we will explore innovations of the industrial era of helium, how much we have left and whether or not this element will go extinct: .




The chemistry behind kibble (VIDEO)

Mar 9, 2019 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Have you ever thought about how strange it is that dogs eat these dry, weird-smelling bits of food for their entire lives and never get sick of them? There are many different dog food formulas on the market, designed for such things as weight loss, long shelf life or a balanced diet. This week on Reactions, you’ll learn what’s behind the chemistry used to make the perfect dog food kibble:




Breast milk as drug-delivery device

Mar 7, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Breast milk as drug-delivery deviceTreating sick babies with engineered breast milk could someday be a reality, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. Modified cells in the liquid could potentially deliver vaccines, fix birth defects or provide proteins that some babies can’t make on their own.


Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanoma

Mar 7, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanomaMalignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed. Now, researchers report in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters that a bacteria from seawater has inspired promising leads for an entirely new way to treat the disease.


Healthier dairy products with bacterial films and nanofiber membranes

Mar 7, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Healthier dairy products with bacterial films and nanofiber membranesBacterial biofilms are typically the target of heavy-duty cleaning regimens, but these films aren’t always bad news. In fact, growing them on thin sheets of nanofibers is a great way to produce a fermented milk product that can deliver hardy probiotics to the digestive tract, according to research just published in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.


Small ‘microdoses’ of psychedelic drugs could treat depression and anxiety

Mar 6, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Small ‘microdoses’ of psychedelic drugs could treat depression and anxietyLava lamps, tambourines and, of course, psychedelic drugs were hallmarks of the 1960s. Psychedelic drugs can make people euphoric, though users can also become extremely anxious and agitated. But that’s at a high dose. Now, in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, researchers report one of the first peer-reviewed studies on a new “microdose” psychedelic treatment regimen. In rats, the treatment appears to relieve anxiety and depression without the typical negative effects of the drugs.


Now you see heat, now you don’t

Mar 2, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Hiding an object from heat-sensing cameras could be useful for military and technology applications as well as for research. Efforts to develop such a method have been underway for decades with varying degrees of success. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that they have fabricated an inexpensive, easy-to-produce film that makes objects completely invisible to infrared detectors.


Detecting cyanide exposure

Mar 2, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Cyanide exposure can happen occupationally or in low levels from inhaling cigarette smoke — or from being poisoned by someone out to get you. The effects are fast and can be deadly. But because cyanide is metabolized quickly, it can be difficult to detect in time for an antidote to be administered. Now, in an animal study in ACS’ Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers report a new precise and accurate biomarker of cyanide exposure.


How hair dye works (video)

Mar 2, 2019 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON— Whether you need a disguise to run from the law or are just trying to emulate *NSYNC-era frosted tips, you may need some chemical assistance to put the hue in your do. To understand how these “shade-y” changes happen, you have to dive back into the history of chemistry. In this week’s Reactions episode, get ready to learn everything you’re “dyeing” to know about artificial hair color:




Delhi’s complicated air pollution problem

Feb 25, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Delhi's complicated air pollution problemAccording to the World Health Organization, Delhi is the world’s most polluted large city. And it’s only going to get worse if something isn’t done about it, say some experts in an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


Keeping heavy metals out of beer and wine

Feb 25, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Keeping heavy metals out of beer and wine A frosty mug of beer or ruby-red glass of wine just wouldn’t be the same if the liquid was murky or gritty. That’s why producers of alcoholic beverages usually filter them. But in a study appearing in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers report that a material often used as a filter could be transferring heavy metals such as arsenic to beer and wine. They also found ways to possibly limit this contamination.


A scientific method for perfect fondue

Feb 25, 2019 — American Chemical Society

A scientific method for perfect fondueCheese fondue is an icon of Swiss cuisine and a dinner party staple. While it may seem like a simple dish, getting the texture right can be a challenge for optimal mouthfeel, dipping and flavor release. This requires the perfect balance of cheese, wine and starch. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Omega reveal how to use these key ingredients to produce deliciously melted fondue.


Watch: Can mixing household cleaners kill you?

Feb 21, 2019 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—When the bathroom starts looking grimy, and it’s time to whip out yellow gloves, the only thing that matters is getting the job done quickly. So you open the cabinet, see a bunch of bottles and think, “Hey, this cleans, and that cleans, so why not mix them all together? That’ll kill dirt and grime even faster!” Think again –– your all-purpose cleaning cocktail could turn a bad day even worse. Can death by toilet-bowl cleaning really happen? Today on Reactions, you’re about to find out:




Powering a pacemaker with a patient’s heartbeat

Feb 20, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Powering a pacemaker with a patient's heartbeatImplantable pacemakers have without doubt altered modern medicine, saving countless lives by regulating heart rhythm. But they have one serious shortcoming: Their batteries last only five to 12 years, at which point they have to be replaced surgically. Now, researchers have surmounted this issue by designing a pacemaker powered by the energy of heartbeats, according to a report in ACS Nano. The device was successfully tested in pigs, which have a similar physiology to humans.


Polymers pave way for wider use of recycled tires in asphalt

Feb 20, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Polymers pave way for wider use of recycled tires in asphaltEach year, about 27 million tires end up in landfills, dumps and stockpiles, where they pose health and environmental hazards. These tires could get a second life as components of the roads they once traveled, but blends of ground tires and asphalt can be unstable. Now, researchers have identified polymer additives that increase the storage stability of asphalt rubber. They report their results in the ACS journal Energy & Fuels.


Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA

Feb 20, 2019 — American Chemical Society

Sensitive sensor detects Down syndrome DNA According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Down syndrome is the most common birth defect, occurring once in every 700 births. However, traditional non-invasive prenatal tests for the condition are unreliable or carry risks for the mother and fetus. Now, researchers have developed a sensitive new biosensor that could someday be used to detect fetal Down syndrome DNA in pregnant women’s blood. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.