American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

The origin of off-taste in onions

Aug 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

The origin of off-taste in onions
Chopping onions is usually associated with watery and stinging eyes. But after the onions are diced and the tears are dried, the vegetable pieces can sometimes develop an unpleasant bitter taste. Now, one group reports in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that they have identified previously unknown compounds causing this off-taste.


Oral delivery of nanoparticles

Aug 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Oral delivery of nanoparticlesNanoparticles show great promise as diagnostic tools and drug delivery agents. The tiny particles, which scientists can modify with drugs, dyes or targeting molecules, can travel in the circulation and squeeze through small spaces into cells and tissues. But until now, most nanoparticles had to be injected into the bloodstream because they weren’t absorbed well orally. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have modified nanoparticles to improve their uptake in the gastrointestinal tract.


World’s oldest cheese found in Egyptian tomb

Aug 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

World's oldest cheese found in Egyptian tomb, The tomb of Ptahmes

Aging usually improves the flavor of cheese, but that’s not why some very old cheese discovered in an Egyptian tomb is drawing attention. Instead, it’s thought to be the most ancient solid cheese ever found, according to a study published in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry.


Popping balloons with style

Aug 10, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Orange peels contain limonene, and this chemical is the key to a party trick in which you can pop a balloon with a twist. Limonene is an exceptionally good solvent for the rubber in balloons, but some other solvents can do it too. In this video, Reactions explains why only some chemicals can burst your bubble (or balloon):




WATCH: The chemistry of Yellowstone’s hot springs

Aug 3, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Yellowstone National Park is a popular destination for vacationers and nature lovers. But if you don’t obey the park’s rules and regulations, you could end up in off-limits areas where the water is dangerous because of its acidity and extreme heat. In this video, Reactions explains how Yellowstone’s geochemistry leads to its unique waters:




Synthetic suede gives high-end cars that luxury feel

Aug 1, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Synthetic suede gives high-end cars that luxury feel
Leather car seats were once synonymous with luxury, but these days, synthetic suede is becoming the material of choice for high-end automobiles. With increased affluence worldwide, and the growing popularity of car-sharing and luxury-driving services, business is booming for manufacturers of synthetic suede. Among these companies, Japanese firms sit snugly in the driver’s seat, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births

Aug 1, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Placenta barrier-on-a-chip could lead to better understanding of premature births
More than one in 10 babies worldwide are born prematurely, according to the World Health Organization. Now scientists report in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering that they have developed an organ-on-a-chip that could help explain why. The device, which replicates the functions of a key membrane in the placenta, could lead to a better understanding of how bacterial infections can promote preterm delivery. It could also lead to new treatments for this condition.


Fast, cheap and colorful 3D printing

Aug 1, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Fast, cheap and colorful 3D printing
People are exploring the use of 3D printing for wide-ranging applications, including manufacturing, medical devices, fashion and even food. But one of the most efficient forms of 3D printing suffers from a major drawback: It can only print objects that are gray or black in color. Now, researchers have tweaked the method so it can print in all of the colors of the rainbow. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.


Cannabidiol: Hope or hype?

Jul 26, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Cannabidiol: Hope or hype?
Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the major phytochemicals in marijuana, has become a popular ingredient in dietary supplements, beauty products and beverages, with claims that the compound improves health and treats ailments ranging from insomnia to cancer. Although research on CBD is accelerating, medical evidence is still lacking for many of these claims, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


Video: How does air conditioning work?

Jul 26, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Air conditioners pull off the seemingly magical feat of making the air inside a home, car or shopping mall deliciously chilly. The source of that sweet relief is chemistry. In this video, Reactions explains how refrigerants and physical chemistry combine to help you beat the summer heat:




Artificial enzymes perform reactions on living cells

Jul 26, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Artificial enzymes perform reactions on living cells
Nature has evolved thousands of enzymes to facilitate the many chemical reactions that take place inside organisms to sustain life. Now, researchers have designed artificial enzymes that sit on the surfaces of living cells and drive reactions that could someday target drug therapies to specific organs. They report their results in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.


A breath test for early-stage Parkinson’s

Jul 26, 2018 — American Chemical Society

A breath test for early-stage Parkinson's
Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include tremor, loss of smell and neuropsychiatric problems. However, many people aren’t diagnosed until their disease is well-advanced, which could limit their treatment options. Now, researchers have tested a sensor to detect early-stage Parkinson’s disease from the breath of patients. They report their results in ACS Chemical Neuroscience.


Why do I have so many kitchen gadgets? (VIDEO)

Jul 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Bulky kitchen gadgets like slow cookers and pressure cookers take up a lot of space. Many people might wonder if owning so many glorified pots is worthwhile. In this video, Reactions explains how slow cookers, pressure cookers and immersion circulators work, and the chemistry of how they cook your food:




‘Greener’ ways to color clothes

Jul 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society

'Greener' ways to color clothes
When buying a new outfit, most people don’t consider the process that went into tinting that vivid red shirt or colorfully patterned dress. But dyeing clothes requires massive amounts of water, energy and chemicals. So companies are working on new ways to color textiles that are both environmentally friendly and cost-effective, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


Water may be key to understanding sweetness

Jul 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Water may be key to understanding sweetness
A cranberry, honey or a candy bar – which tastes the sweetest? These foods contain sugars that humans can perceive differently. A cranberry seems tart, whereas a candy bar can be excessively sweet, and honey is somewhere in the middle. Now, in a study in ACS’ The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers have shown that the perception of sweetness depends on molecular interactions between specific sugars and water in the saliva.


A safe and effective way to whiten teeth

Jul 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society

A safe and effective way to whiten teeth
In the age of Instagram and Snapchat, everyone wants to have perfect pearly whites. To get a brighter smile, consumers can opt for over the counter teeth-whitening treatments or a trip to the dentist to have their teeth bleached professionally. But both types of treatments can harm teeth. According to an article published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, researchers have now developed a new, less destructive method.


‘Nowcasting’ beach water quality

Jul 19, 2018 — American Chemical Society

'Nowcasting' beach water quality
Arriving at your favorite beach only to discover it’s closed because of bacterial contamination can be a bummer. But even worse would be unknowingly swimming in waters polluted with fecal material — a very real possibility, given that current detection methods can require up to 24 hours to obtain results. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology have identified computer models that provide accurate short-term forecasts, or “nowcasts,” of beach water quality.


CRISPR’s growing pains

Jul 14, 2018 — American Chemical Society

CRISPR gene editing
In the six years since its inception, CRISPR gene editing has experienced ups and downs, from giddy excitement over the technology’s potential to cure genetic diseases to patent disputes, ethical considerations and cancer scares. Despite recent setbacks, companies developing CRISPR therapies are forging ahead, reports an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.


The ultimate ‘smell test’: Device sends rotten food warning to smartphones

Jul 14, 2018 — American Chemical Society

The ultimate 'smell test': Device sends rotten food warning to smartphones
When it comes to the “smell test,” the nose isn’t always the best judge of food quality. Now in a study appearing in ACS’ journal Nano Letters, scientists report that they have developed a wireless tagging device that can send signals to smartphones warning consumers and food distributors when meat and other perishables have spoiled. They say this new sensor could improve the detection of rotten food so it is tossed before consumers eat it. 


Building a chemical weapons detector with Legos®

Jul 13, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Building a chemical weapons detector with Legos®
Nerve agents are scary stuff. They are among the most deadly substances on earth, yet can be odorless, tasteless and difficult to detect. But researchers now report in ACS Central Science that they have adapted building materials normally associated with children’s toys and a cell phone to help sense these compounds. The new method can sensitively detect these poisons, quantify the amount and distinguish between different classes present at contaminated sites.