American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

Wringing water from the air

Oct 17, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Wringing water from the air
Scientists estimate that half a billion people in the world lack sufficient water to meet their daily needs, and that number is only expected to rise with the ever-growing population and a changing climate.  Therefore, researchers are working on technologies to soak up water from an abundant resource — the air. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, describes several promising approaches.


Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney

Oct 17, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney
There just aren’t enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kidney with the potential to make dialysis more convenient, comfortable and effective.


Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time

Oct 17, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time
Moss, one of the world’s oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it. Now in a study appearing in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report that they have found a simple and inexpensive way to detect air pollutants, specifically sulfur dioxide, in real time based on subtle changes in moss leaves. The discovery could rapidly alert authorities to potentially dangerous alterations in air quality using a sustainable, natural plant sensor.


3D-printed lithium-ion batteries

Oct 17, 2018 — American Chemical Society

3D-printed lithium-ion batteries
Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially available batteries. But researchers have developed a new method to 3D print lithium-ion batteries in virtually any shape. They report their results in ACS Applied Energy Materials.


Tiny tools for a big industry

Oct 12, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Seeking to boost oil production, petroleum researchers turn to nanotech
Even with technological advances in recent years, the petroleum industry still struggles to squeeze as much oil and gas as possible out of underground reservoirs. Now the big industry is looking to nanotechnology to boost efficiency. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the tiny particles could help pinpoint oil pockets, monitor underground conditions and extract more trapped oil.


Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments

Oct 12, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Color-changing contact lens could enhance monitoring of eye disease treatments
For all the good they do, eye drops and ointments have one major drawback: It’s hard to tell how much of the medication is actually getting to the eye. Now in a study appearing in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, scientists report that they have developed a contact lens that changes color as drugs are released. This visual indicator could help eye doctors and patients readily determine whether these medications are where they should be.


Blue roses could be coming soon to a garden near you

Oct 11, 2018 — American Chemical Society


For centuries, gardeners have attempted to breed blue roses with no success. But now, thanks to modern biotechnology, the elusive blue rose may finally be attainable. Researchers have found a way to express pigment-producing enzymes from bacteria in the petals of a white rose, tinting the flowers blue. They report their results in ACS Synthetic Biology.


WATCH: What makes tardigrades such great survivors

Oct 11, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Tardigrades are tiny animals that can live in water droplets just about anywhere. When those water droplets dry out, tardigrades undergo an astonishing transformation to survive the lack of water. In this video, Reactions explores the chemistry of these remarkable survivors




Natto, the stinky, slimy soybean snack (VIDEO)

Sep 29, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Natto, a food made from fermented soybeans, often turns off newcomers to Japanese food due to its strong smell and stringy slime. But many people love its earthy, cheesy flavor or eat it for its supposed health benefits. In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of natto — and we try some for ourselves.




Protecting probiotics from the stomach

Sep 29, 2018 — American Chemical Society


The small intestine is a hotbed of microbial activity and a target of probiotic treatments for diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, among other conditions. To make it to the intestine, though, probiotics must first pass through the stomach, a hostile acidic environment that can kill these beneficial bacteria. Now, scientists report in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering the development of a protective gel sphere that may offer probiotics a safer route.


‘Paintable’ chemotherapy shrinks skin tumors in mice

Sep 29, 2018 — American Chemical Society

'Paintable' chemotherapy shrinks skin tumors in mice
Skin acts as the first line of defense against pathogens and other harmful material from outside the body. Yet this barrier also excludes some beneficial drugs that could treat skin diseases. Now, researchers have taken the first steps in developing a chemotherapy for melanoma that can be “painted” directly on the skin, rather than injected or taken orally. They report their results in ACS Nano.


Compound improves social interaction in autism mouse model

Sep 29, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Compound improves social interaction in autism mouse model
Children with autism often find social interactions awkward, leaving them isolated. Now in a study appearing in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, scientists report that they have discovered a first-of-its-kind compound that promotes social interaction among laboratory mice that display autistic traits. The finding could lead to the development of drugs capable of improving social behaviors in those who have autism.


Harmful bacteria thrived in post-Hurricane Harvey floodwaters

Sep 29, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Harmful bacteria thrived in post-Hurricane Harvey floodwaters
Hurricane Harvey made landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017, bringing more than 50 inches of rain and extreme flooding to the city of Houston. In addition to wreaking havoc on buildings and infrastructure, urban floodwaters harbor hidden menaces in the form of bacteria that can cause disease. Now, researchers have surveyed the microbes that lurked in Houston floodwaters, both inside and outside of homes. They report their results in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.


Green tea compound helps siRNA slip inside cells

Sep 29, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Green tea compound helps siRNA slip inside cells

Drinking green tea has been linked to health benefits ranging from cardiovascular disease prevention to weight loss. Although many of these claims still need to be verified in the clinic, an antioxidant in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) appears to have beneficial effects in cells and animals. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for EGCG: sneaking therapeutic RNAs into cells. They report their results in ACS Central Science.


Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator

Sep 29, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator
Water covers most of the globe, yet many regions still suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. If scientists could efficiently and sustainably turn seawater into clean water, a looming global water crisis might be averted. Now, inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers have devised a solar steam generator that approaches 100 percent efficiency for the production of clean water. They report their results in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.


‘Hoppy’ beer without exploding bottles and too much alcohol

Sep 29, 2018 — American Chemical Society

What-Is-Dry-Hopping.jpg
The forgotten art of “dry-hopping” beer to enhance flavor is back in vogue. But this practice sometimes has undesirable side effects, such as an unexpectedly high alcohol content and high pressures that could cause beer bottles to break. Now, research published in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry explains the biochemical basis of these unintended consequences, which could help brewers create “hoppy” beverages without the quality-control and safety issues.


Ants surrender their venomous secrets

Sep 24, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Ants surrender their venomous secrets
Venoms produced by snails, snakes, scorpions and spiders contain numerous bioactive compounds that could lead to therapeutic drugs or insect-specific pesticides. Yet little is known about venoms produced by insects, in part because each bug contains such a tiny amount. Researchers recently responded to this challenge by conducting one of the first intensive studies of ant venom. They have now published their findings in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research.


A wearable device for regrowing hair

Sep 24, 2018 — American Chemical Society

A wearable device for regrowing hair
Although some people embrace the saying “bald is beautiful,” for others, alopecia, or excessive hair loss, can cause stress and anxiety. Some studies have shown that stimulating the skin with lasers can help regrow hair, but the equipment is often large, consumes lots of energy and is difficult to use in daily life. Now, researchers have developed a flexible, wearable photostimulator that speeds up hair growth in mice. They report their results in ACS Nano.


Sensors that are literally ‘music to one’s ears’ (video)

Sep 24, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Researchers have found a new use for a 3,000-year-old African musical instrument: detecting toxic substances and counterfeit medications. The sensor, based on the mbira (pronounced “em-bir’-uh”) is inexpensive and easy to operate, allowing its use in developing regions, the researchers say.




How silver nanoparticles cut odors (VIDEO)

Sep 22, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, — Trendy workout clothes may advertise that special silver nanoparticles embedded in the fabric will cut the sweaty odor that builds up from repeated gym visits. It turns out there’s some truth to these claims. Silver can kill the bacteria that cause B.O., and new techniques, including nanotech, allow clothing manufacturers to incorporate silver that doesn’t come out in the wash or harm the environment. In this video, Reactions explains how all of that is possible. And don’t forget: #NationalNanoDay is October 9, and ACS is celebrating science on the nanoscale all week. Whether you’re a nano expert, a teacher in the classroom, a student interested in career opportunities or just curious to learn more, visit http://www.acs.org/nano

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