American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

Watch: How Milk Becomes Cheese

May 17, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Making cheese is an ancient exercise in preserving the nutritional value of milk. And it’s also pretty tasty. With help from the St. James Cheese Company in New Orleans, Reactions explains how milk becomes cheese, why microbes make it taste better, and why cheese is yellow.




Beef peptides block bitter tastes

May 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Beef peptides block bitter tastes
From burgers to steaks, beef has a long history of being a delicious part of dinner. But what if that pleasant experience of eating beef could extend beyond the dinner plate? Now, one group reports in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that beef protein, when broken down into peptides, can block bitter taste receptors on the tongue. Such peptides could someday be used to make other foods and even medicines taste better.


Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pill

May 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Diagnosing breast cancer with an imaging pill
For women, mammograms are a sometimes uncomfortable, but necessary, annual ritual. But this procedure doesn’t always provide accurate results, and it exposes women to X-rays. In a study appearing in ACS’ journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, scientists report that they have developed a non-invasive “disease screening pill” that can make cancerous tumors light up when exposed to near-infrared light in mice without using radiation.


Step aside Superman, steel is no competition for this new material

May 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Step aside Superman, steel is no competition for this new material
When it comes to materials, there is no question as to who wins the strongman competition. Spider silk is known as being the strongest fabric, and steel, ceramics and glass fibers are the best building materials. But now, researchers are reporting in ACS Nano that specially arranged nano-sized cellulose fibers are the strongest material of them all, in a move that might cause some to re-name Superman the “man of cellulose.”


Does Melatonin Do Anything? (VIDEO)

May 10, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Melatonin is a widely used supplement. Many people turn to the hormone hoping it will improve their sleep, but do claims of its efficacy have any merit? Clinical evidence suggests that the benefits of melatonin are modest, and it may not help everyone. And there’s little to stop supplement makers from selling you snake oil. Reactions explains the chemistry of this popular sleep aid:




A detective story of wildfires and wine

May 9, 2018 — American Chemical Society

A detective story of wildfires and wine
In this story of wine and smoke taint, everyone knows “whodunit” — it’s the smoke from wildfires. But it’s the “how” that’s got researchers and winemakers stymied. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are making some headway, sifting through complex, and perhaps misleading, clues.


Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugs

May 9, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Red Sea fungus yields leads for new epilepsy drugs
New treatments for epilepsy are sorely needed because current medications don’t work for many people with the disease. To find new leads, researchers have now turned to the sea — a source of unique natural products that have been largely untapped for prospective drugs. The scientists report in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience that two metabolites produced by a fungus from the Red Sea look promising.


Battery-free ‘smart’ toys move closer to commercial reality (video)

May 9, 2018 — American Chemical Society

battery-free-smart-toys-move-closer-to-commercial-reality-video
Rubber duckies could soon be at the forefront of an electronic revolution. In ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, scientists report they have used specialized nanogenerators that gather energy from mechanical vibrations to transform squeaky bathtub companions and other conventional children’s toys into ‘smart’ electronics. They say the finding could have broad commercial applications, leading to the development of battery-free, self-powered toys, medical sensors and other devices. Watch a video of prototype toys here.




Nutmeg’s hidden power: Helping the liver

May 9, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Nutmeg's hidden power: Helping the liver, Nutmeg prevents damage to the liver
Smelling nutmeg evokes images of fall, pumpkin pie and hot apple cider. But the spice has been used for years in traditional Chinese medicine to treat gastrointestinal illnesses. Now one group reports in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research that they have figured out how nutmeg helps other organs, specifically the liver.


Harvesting health information from an unusual place: The wastewater treatment plant

May 2, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Harvesting health information from an unusual place: The wastewater treatment plant
Every day, people all over the world unwittingly release a flood of data on what drugs they are taking and what illnesses they are battling, simply by going to the bathroom and flushing. And according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers aren’t letting all of that information go to waste.


As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concerns

May 2, 2018 — American Chemical Society

As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concerns
As technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology that by studying lake sediments they can construct a history of tellurium as it was deposited in the environment.


Precise targeting technique could regulate gut bacteria, curtailing disease

May 2, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Precise targeting technique could regulate gut bacteria, curtailing disease
Emerging evidence suggests that microbes in the digestive system have a big influence on human health and may play a role in the onset of disease throughout the body. Now, in a study appearing in ACS Chemical Biology, scientists report that they have potentially found a way to use chemical compounds to target and inhibit the growth of specific microbes in the gut associated with diseases without causing harm to other beneficial organisms.


Improving 3-D printing of plastic parts

May 2, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Improving 3-D printing of plastic parts
Robots that can build homes, marathoners’ running shoes and NASA’s upcoming spacecraft all have one thing in common: 3-D printed parts. But as enthusiasm for 3-D printing continues to grow and expand across markets, the objects printed by the process can have weaknesses. Now, one group reports in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that using a simple modification to the manufacture of the starting materials improves the toughness of these printable plastics.


How airbags work (video)

May 2, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON — Normally, something blowing up in your face is bad. But in the event of a vehicle accident, and in conjunction with a seatbelt, one particular explosion could very well save your life. It’s the chemical reaction that inflates your airbags. In this episode of Reactions, learn about the past and present of vehicle airbags and the lifesaving chemistry and physics that make them work:




Generic drug manufacturers see new opportunities ahead

Apr 25, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Generic drug manufacturers see new opportunities ahead
Declining prices and a saturated market could spell doom-and-gloom for the generic pharmaceutical industry, but some in the business are turning lemons into lemonade, seeing opportunities instead. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, these companies are putting their special expertise in chemistry to work.


Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson’s Disease

Apr 25, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson's Disease
The rabies virus wreaks havoc on the brain, triggering psychosis and death. To get where it needs to go, the virus must first trick the nervous system and cross the blood brain barrier — a process that makes it of interest in drug design. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a way to exploit the rabies virus machinery to deliver a Parkinson’s disease medication directly to the brain.


Sunlight works against oil clean-up efforts

Apr 25, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Sunlight works against oil clean-up effortsOil spills, whether minor leaks or major environmental disasters, are bound to happen. Chemical dispersants are one of the tools that can help mitigate the impact of such spills, but they become less effective as oil weathers in the environment. Now, one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology Letters that sunlight has a much greater impact than previously thought on the effectiveness of these dispersants.


Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries safer

Apr 25, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries safer
From cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer battery, scientists report in the ACS journal Nano Letters that the addition of nanowires can not only enhance the battery’s fire-resistant capabilities, but also its other properties.



Stemming the tide of ocean plastics

Apr 23, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Stemming the tide of ocean plastics
As people in the developing countries become more affluent, they end up buying more plastics. But these areas often don’t have good waste management procedures in place, so a lot of that plastic eventually ends up in the ocean, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


Harvesting water from fog with harps (video)

Apr 23, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Harvesting water from fog with harps (video)

As summertime draws near, some people around the U.S. will face annual water usage restrictions as water supplies become strained. But for those who live in arid climates year-round, water shortages are a constant concern. In these areas, residents must capitalize on even the smallest bit of moisture in the air. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a type of “harp” to harvest fresh water from fog.