American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

Should Santa wear a flame-retardant suit? (VIDEO)

Dec 14, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Saint Nick faces a host of hazards during the holiday season, from the calories in cookies to the dying embers in your fireplace. A flame-retardant suit could save Santa from a seriously un-jolly circumstance. But many believe these molecules belong on the naughty list due to the potential risks they pose to human health. In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of flame retardants and asks whether Father Christmas should bother swapping out his suit:




A banner year for pharma

Dec 7, 2018 — American Chemical Society


As 2018 draws to a close, the pharmaceutical industry is celebrating a prosperous year of new investments and therapeutic breakthroughs. These successes were driven by cutting-edge science and progress in finally translating long-standing technology into actual products, according to a cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs

Dec 7, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs
New Mexico contains hundreds of historic uranium mines. Although active uranium mining in the state has ceased, rates of cardiovascular and metabolic disease remain high in the population residing close to mines within the Navajo Nation. According to a new study in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, inhaled uranium in dusts from the mines could be a factor.


Paving the way for more efficient hydrogen cars

Dec 7, 2018 — American Chemical Society


Hydrogen-powered vehicles emit only water vapor from their tailpipes, offering a cleaner alternative to fossil-fuel-based transportation. But for hydrogen cars to become mainstream, scientists need to develop more efficient hydrogen-storage systems. Now, researchers reporting in ACS’ Chemistry of Materials have used metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) to set a new record for hydrogen storage capacity under normal operating conditions.


Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper

Dec 6, 2018 — American Chemical Society

  Write with heat, cool and then repeat with rewritable paper  
The image on this cell phone case can change because it was made with rewritable paper.

Even in this digital age, paper is still everywhere. Often, printed materials get used once and are then discarded, creating waste and potentially pollution. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of an easy-to-make “rewritable” paper that can be drawn or printed on over and over again. The messages can last more than half a year, compared to other rewritable papers whose messages fade after a few days or a few months.


Why Antarctic fish don’t freeze to death (VIDEO)

Dec 6, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—The notothenioid fishes that inhabit the Antarctic Ocean have evolved an unusual adaptation to living in icy waters. Their blood contains antifreeze proteins that prevent ice from growing within the fishes’ bodies and actually lower the freezing temperature of their tissues. In this video, Reactions meets these bizarre animals:




Flexible electronic skin aids human-machine interactions (video)

Dec 3, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Human skin contains sensitive nerve cells that detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. To help robots and prosthetic devices attain these abilities, scientists are trying to develop electronic skins. Now researchers report a new method in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that creates an ultrathin, stretchable electronic skin, which could be used for a variety of human-machine interactions.




Sharing benefits of digitized DNA

Nov 30, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Sharing benefits of digitized DNA
Today, scientists can sift through quadrillions of genetic sequences in open-access databases, searching (free-of-charge) for new ways to engineer crops, develop medicines or even create synthetic organisms. But a controversial proposal that aims to share the benefits of digitized DNA could affect scientists’ ability to use these data, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


Authenticating the geographic origin of hazelnuts

Nov 30, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Authenticating the geographic origin of hazelnuts
Hazelnuts, like olive oil, cheese and other agricultural products, differ in flavor depending on their geographic origin. Because consumers and processors are willing to pay more for better nuts — especially in fine chocolates and other delicacies — testing methods are needed to reliably authenticate the nuts’ country of origin. Researchers now report in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that NMR analysis could fill the bill.


Checking water quality at the tap

Nov 30, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Checking water quality at the tap
When consumers turn on a faucet, they expect the drinking water that gushes out to be safe. A new report in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology found that U.S. public-supply tap water generally meets all enforceable standards. However, routine testing for most prospective contaminants is carried out before water is distributed, not where it’s used, and the report indicates some consumers are exposed to contaminant mixtures that aren’t commonly monitored.


What’s the difference between relative humidity and dew point?

Nov 30, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Meteorologists often report the amount of moisture in the air as relative humidity or dew point. These measures can be confusing to people who are just trying to determine if the weather outside will feel comfortable. Both relate to the chemistry of water dissolving in air, but in different ways. In this video, Reactions decodes these weather terms to help you make sense of the forecast: .




On-demand biologics

Nov 28, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Making biologics on demand
Many life-saving medicines, including insulin, antibodies and vaccines, are derived from living cells. These “biologics” can be difficult to obtain and store on the battlefield or in remote areas. That’s why scientists are trying to develop portable systems that can quickly manufacture small batches of protein therapeutics on demand, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.


Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells

Nov 28, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells
Pancreatic cancer cells are known for their ability to thrive under extreme conditions of low nutrients and oxygen, a trait known in the cancer field as “austerity.” The cells’ remarkable resistance to starvation is one reason why pancreatic cancer is so deadly. Now researchers have identified a compound from a Congolese plant that has strong “antiausterity” potential, making pancreatic cancer cells susceptible to nutrient starvation. They report their results in ACS’ Journal of Natural Products.


How exercise could help fight drug addiction

Nov 28, 2018 — American Chemical Society

How exercise could help fight drug addiction
The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user’s resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brain, according to a study in the journal ACS Omega.


A bionic mushroom that generates electricity

Nov 28, 2018 — American Chemical Society

A bionic mushroom that generates electricity
In the quest to replace fossil fuels, scientists are always on the lookout for alternative, environmentally friendly sources of energy. But who could have imagined a bionic mushroom that produces electricity? It sounds like something straight out of Alice in Wonderland, but researchers have now generated mushrooms patterned with energy-producing bacteria and an electrode network. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.


How is Leather Made?—VIDEO

Nov 16, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—The chemical process of tanning turns animal hides into durable, supple leather. Although this technology is thousands of years old, scientists are still trying to understand the exact chemical changes involved. In this video, Reactions explains how leather is made:




Watch: Is throwing rice at weddings bad for birds?

Nov 9, 2018 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON—Many people believe that throwing rice at weddings is harmful to wild birds. Supposedly, the rice expands in the birds’ digestive systems and injures them. This myth has become widespread after appearing in places as varied as an “Ann Landers” column and an episode of “The Simpsons.” In this video, Reactions uses some hands-on chemistry to demonstrate that rice is no more harmful than other grains and that this misconception is for the birds:




Powerful method probes small-molecule structures

Nov 8, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Powerful method probes small-molecule structures
Small molecules — from naturally occurring metabolites and hormones to synthetic medicines and pesticides — can have big effects on living things. But for scientists to understand how the molecules work and how to design beneficial ones, they need to know the precise arrangement of atoms and chemical bonds. Now researchers have found a faster, simpler and potentially more reliable way to solve the structures of small molecules. They report their results in ACS Central Science.


A newly discovered, naturally low-caffeine tea plant

Nov 8, 2018 — American Chemical Society

Hongyacha
Tea drinkers who seek the popular beverage’s soothing flavor without its explosive caffeine jolt could soon have a new, naturally low-caffeine option. In a study appearing in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that a recently discovered wild tea plant in China contains little or no caffeine and, unlike many industrially decaffeinated products, could potentially provide many of the health benefits of regular brewed teas.


The when, where and what of air pollutant exposure

Nov 8, 2018 — American Chemical Society

The when, where and what of air pollutant exposure
Scientists have linked air pollution with many health conditions including asthma, heart disease, lung cancer and premature death. Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter is especially harmful because the tiny particles (diameter of 2.5 μm or less) can penetrate deep within the lungs. Now, researchers have integrated data from multiple sources to determine the personal exposure of people in peri-urban India to fine particulate matter. They report their results in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology.