Health and Medicine

WhatFinger

Cell discovery holds out promise for Parkinson’s therapy

Cell discovery holds out promise for Parkinson’s therapy
An Israeli-led international study featured on the cover of The Journal of Neuroscience in February, holds the promise of advancing the field of cell-replacement therapy for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD).

PD, which affects millions of people worldwide, causes devastating motor symptoms due to a loss of dopamine-secreting brain cells (dopaminergic neurons). Although there is no cure for PD, its symptoms can be treated.

By ISRAEL21c - Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Israeli scientist working on Alzheimer’s vaccine

Israeli scientist working on Alzheimer’s vaccine
Alzheimer’s disease, affecting some 47 million people worldwide, for now remains an irreversible and fatal brain disorder. Taking a proactive approach, an Israeli brain researcher is developing a vaccine against this devastating disease.

Most vaccines work by mounting an immune response toward a weakened pathogen to boost the immune system’s ability to fight the real pathogen. Prof. Eitan Okun’s vaccine primes the body to attack amyloid beta protein accumulations in the brain, one of the signature signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

By ISRAEL21c - Tuesday, April 17, 2018

We Need Lee Kwan Yew – Not an Opioid Summit

Lee Kwan Yew, Death for Drug Dealers, Opiods
Why don’t we learn from history when the question is a no-brainer? For instance, a recent editorial in a major Canadian newspaper states, “We Need an Opioid Summit.”  One could add to this headline, “a Summit that would solve nothing and cost taxpayers millions of dollars.” What we actually need is the perspective of Lee Kwan Yew, Prime Minister of Singapore. Unfortunately he’s dead.

Saskatoon police recently disclosed publicly the name and telephone number of a known drug dealer. They warned people that cocaine purchased from the dealer might also contain fentanyl. It could kill them. Last year the Canadian government stated that about 4,000 citizens died from drug overdose. More bluntly, they were murdered by poison by drug dealers, more easily than being murdered by a gun.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, April 16, 2018

Exercise Can Kill You

Exercise Can Kill You
The Earl of Darby once remarked that “Those who don’t take time for wellness, will eventually have to make time for sickness.” Like many doctors, I too have advised patients and readers to exercise as part of a healthy lifestyle. Now, Dr. Maureen Brogan, Associate Professor of Medicine at New York Medical College, reports that intense, repetitive, motion exercise can cause rhabdomyolysis. And in rare cases it can kill.

Brogan explains that when muscle is damaged, it dumps myoglobin, an iron and oxygen-binding muscle protein, into blood circulation.  Excessive amounts of myoglobin can obstruct the kidney’s filtration system and cause serious damage.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, April 9, 2018

Lighting the way to targeted therapies and fewer side effects

Lighting the way to targeted therapies and fewer side effects
Side effects from drugs working in non-target locations within the body can cause debilitating symptoms, often resulting in patients stopping their course of treatment early. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are developing strategies to reduce side effects by turning drugs on and off with light in specific locations, such as a tumor.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Connecting hearing helper molecules to the ear bone

Connecting hearing helper molecules to the ear bone
Hearing loss is a common affliction associated with advancing age and exposure to very loud noises, affecting two-thirds of adults over age 70. But living with hearing loss may not be inevitable. Scientists report in the ACS journal Bioconjugate Chemistry a novel approach to the restoration of hearing that delivers stimulants of cell growth and connectivity directly to damaged ear cells.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, April 4, 2018

ECGs on the move, thanks to Israeli ingenuity

ECGs on the move, thanks to Israeli ingenuity
If your doctor orders an electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) to check your heart rhythm and blood flow or to diagnose a heart attack, a technician will stick 10 or 12 adhesive electrodes to your chest, arms and legs. A computer then creates a graph showing the electrical impulses moving through your heart while you’re lying still or exercising.

That’s how an ECG is done today. Advanced wearable technologies from Israel aim to change the procedure radically.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Is There a Doctor On the Plane?

Is There a Doctor On the Plane?
What is it that doctors worry about when they’re flying?  It’s not fear of flying. They know that travelling by air is safer than driving a car. Rather, it’s the possibility that they will hear a sudden announcement, “Is there a doctor on the plane?” This is when the brain shifts into high gear.

Every time it happens to me, it reminds me of my days of internship at the Montreal General Hospital.  Interns took turns riding in the ambulance on emergency calls. We never knew what we might encounter. But at least our feet were on terra firma, and we knew that on returning to the hospital specific   expertise would be available.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, April 2, 2018

High-tech capsule could be alternative to colonoscopy

High-tech capsule could be alternative to colonoscopy
Let’s face it: Nobody wants to go through a colonoscopy, recommended for people over 50 to screen for colorectal cancer — the third most common cancer, with approximately 1.4 million new cases diagnosed worldwide each year, and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths.

Because nearly one-third of the eligible US population and more than 60 percent of people outside the US choose to avoid the invasive endoscopic colonoscopy procedure and its laxative preparation, global screening rates remain low. Yet evidence shows the removal of adenomatous polyps found through colonoscopy can reduce colorectal incidence and mortality.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, March 28, 2018

New drug-release method avoids harming healthy tissue

New drug-release method avoids harming healthy tissue
Researchers at the Technion Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Engineering have developed a new, highly targeted technology for drug delivery that uses light to affect only the diseased tissue the drug is targeting.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Making water from the air to keep kids healthy in India

Making water from the air to keep kids healthy in India
Max Simonovsky’s two-and-a-half-year-old son was well trained in routine handwashing. But one day when the water in his Rehovot neighborhood was shut off for repairs, the boy reasoned that if water wasn’t available, he therefore had no need to wash his hands after playing outside.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, March 21, 2018

The Philippines Finance Oral Insulin Pill

The Philippines Finance Oral Insulin Pill,
A Spanish proverb states, “He loses all who loses the right moment.” I had a similar thought a few weeks ago when I wrote that, “a brain that’s full of knowledge has no room left to dream.”

Why these philosophical mutterings?  Because I was annoyed that Canada had lost a major medical opportunity. Now, the insulin mouth rinse that should have been a “Canadian First”, is a Philippine economic coup. It’s a loss for Canada. But the Philippines had the vision to see that an oral insulin product offers immense medical and financial benefits.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, March 19, 2018

US Government’s Crackdown On PrimaryCare Physicians

 US Government's Crackdown On PrimaryCare Physicians
To understand how the government has stepped over the line with their current crackdown on primary healthcare physicians, we must look at how the politicians responded to the opioid crisis when it first reared its ugly head.

In the late 1990s, pharmaceutical companies reassured the medical community that patients would not become addicted to opioid pain relievers and encouraged healthcare providers to prescribe them at greater rates. All the more profits for the Big Pharma shareholders, right?

According to a report written by the HHS, “Increased prescription of opioid medications led to widespread misuse of both prescription and non-prescription opioids before it became clear that these medications could indeed be highly addictive.”

By Robert Steven Ingebo - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Fast-tracking endocrine assays

Fast-tracking endocrine assays
Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals can cause health effects, such as reduced fertility and increased incidences of obesity and diabetes. Two decades ago, Congress directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to screen substances for this activity. Now, the agency is ramping up its efforts, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Mediterranean Diet for a Long Life

Mediterranean Diet for a Long Life

Leonardo da Vinci once remarked, “Trifles make perfection and perfection is no trifle.” Trifles can make a huge difference in surgery, when building rockets, in nutrition, or in life generally. For instance, a report in the publication LifeExtension shows that a Mediterranean Diet prolongs life. As we all age, this is no trifle.

For years doctors and nutritionists have known the Mediterranean Diet is a “Five Star” one. But no one knew why this diet had such remarkable benefits. Now, researchers have discovered its success is due to polyphenols (a plant based compound). They lower the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by an amazing 60 percent! This means fewer heart attacks, strokes, hypertension and less inflammation.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, March 12, 2018