Health and Medicine

WhatFinger

US Government’s Crackdown On PrimaryCare Physicians

 US Government's Crackdown On PrimaryCare Physicians
To understand how the government has stepped over the line with their current crackdown on primary healthcare physicians, we must look at how the politicians responded to the opioid crisis when it first reared its ugly head.

In the late 1990s, pharmaceutical companies reassured the medical community that patients would not become addicted to opioid pain relievers and encouraged healthcare providers to prescribe them at greater rates. All the more profits for the Big Pharma shareholders, right?

According to a report written by the HHS, “Increased prescription of opioid medications led to widespread misuse of both prescription and non-prescription opioids before it became clear that these medications could indeed be highly addictive.”

By Robert Steven Ingebo - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Fast-tracking endocrine assays

Fast-tracking endocrine assays
Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals can cause health effects, such as reduced fertility and increased incidences of obesity and diabetes. Two decades ago, Congress directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to screen substances for this activity. Now, the agency is ramping up its efforts, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

Mediterranean Diet for a Long Life

Mediterranean Diet for a Long Life

Leonardo da Vinci once remarked, “Trifles make perfection and perfection is no trifle.” Trifles can make a huge difference in surgery, when building rockets, in nutrition, or in life generally. For instance, a report in the publication LifeExtension shows that a Mediterranean Diet prolongs life. As we all age, this is no trifle.

For years doctors and nutritionists have known the Mediterranean Diet is a “Five Star” one. But no one knew why this diet had such remarkable benefits. Now, researchers have discovered its success is due to polyphenols (a plant based compound). They lower the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) by an amazing 60 percent! This means fewer heart attacks, strokes, hypertension and less inflammation.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, March 12, 2018

More realistic and accurate organs-on-chips

More realistic and accurate organs-on-chips
In a step toward better diagnosis and treatment of digestive conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, scientists report in ACS Biomaterials & Engineering that they have developed a first-of-its-kind collagen-based membrane for use in microchips. The membrane is more natural than others that are available, and it could allow organs-on-chips to more accurately replicate how healthy intestinal cells become diseased and how they react to drug treatments.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, March 12, 2018

HCR ManorCare Bankruptcy and Patients

HCR ManorCare Bankruptcy and Patients
One of the largest nursing home chains in the U.S., HCR ManorCare Inc. has filed for bankruptcy protection on March 4, 2018 in the Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Delaware.  Quality Care Properties Inc., HCR’s landlord, will take control of the company.

The private-equity firm Carlyle Group owns HCR ManorCare Inc. The departing CEO, Paul Ormond received $115 million in deferred compensation and severance even though HCR is approximately $230 million in debt.

HCR missed numerous rent payments even though Quality Care Properties Inc. agreed to multiple temporary reductions in such payments. Last August QCP took legal action and sued “to replace the company’s management and to appoint a receiver with the power to collect rent.”

By Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh - Friday, March 9, 2018

Sample storage method could improve health care in resource-limited regions

Sample storage method could improve health care in resource-limited regions
Blood and urine tests play vital roles in modern medicine. Yet in vast regions of the world where refrigeration is not available, preserving samples for testing is virtually impossible. Now in a study appearing in ACS’ journal Chemistry of Materials, scientists report that encapsulating indicators of disease from samples in tiny metal-organic hybrid structures could help. They say finding could lead to better health care in resource-limited countries.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Wine polyphenols could fend off bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease

Wine polyphenols could fend off bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease
Sipping wine is good for your colon and heart, possibly because of the beverage’s abundant and structurally diverse polyphenols. Now researchers report in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that wine polyphenols might also be good for your oral health.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Insomnia; It’s Shortening Your Life

Insomnia; It’s Shortening Your Life
F. Scott Fitzgerald, the author, once remarked, “The worst thing in the world is try to sleep and not to.” I’m sure many readers share Fitzgerald’s problem. But suppose this common trouble kills you? That’s when it’s worthwhile to find out more about insomnia, and why some people suffer from TAT (Tired all the Time).

Professor Matthew Walker is founder of the University of California Berkeley’s Center for Human Sleep Science. He’s also author of the book, “Why We Sleep.” Walker says, “The silent sleep loss epidemic is one of the greatest public health challenges we face in the 21st century.”

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, March 5, 2018

Recruiting the immune system to prevent relapse

Vaccines against addictive drugs push forward despite past failures
Substance abuse, particularly opioid abuse, is an ongoing issue in the U.S. While treatments such as drug counseling and a handful of medications to combat withdrawal symptoms and cravings exist, the fear and risk of relapsing is real. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, describes how vaccines targeting drugs of abuse could prevent relapse.

As C&EN Deputy Executive Editor Michael Torrice reports, the idea of preventing relapse with vaccines has been around since the 1970s. But researchers have been unable to translate success in animal studies to those involving humans. About a decade ago, several vaccines entered clinical trials, but these vaccines were met with disappointing results.

Researchers learned from these failed studies that not all participants react to the vaccines similarly. While some people’s immune systems created high levels of antibodies against the drugs, others did not. As a result, groups went back to the drawing board and started optimizing and reformulating their vaccines and are now awaiting clinical trial data to see if these new formulations worked.

Vaccines against addictive drugs push forward despite past failures

By American Chemical Society - Sunday, March 4, 2018

An improved anti-addiction medication

An improved anti-addiction medication
Drug addiction continues to plague vast numbers of people across the world, destroying and ending lives, while attempts to develop more effective pharmaceutical addiction treatments continue. Scientists now report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society the development of a potent new medicine to fight addiction, which might also be an effective treatment for epilepsy and other conditions.

By American Chemical Society - Sunday, March 4, 2018

Why Don’t They Read History to Save Lives?

Why Don’t They Read History to Save Lives?
It’s been said that “If you don’t learn from history, you’re destined to relive it”. So today I have to repeat what I’ve said before. It’s apparent that the medical profession, TV anchors, and Medical Officers of Health (MOH), have never read history. So young children, and others, are dying of influenza.

Today, rather than believing what I write, go to the internet and read about the history of Dr Klenner. During the great polio epidemic of 1948, Dr. Frederick Klenner, a family doctor in North Carolina, was placed in charge of a ward of 60 patients stricken with this paralyzing disease.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, February 26, 2018

Saving lives in the ICU through artificial intelligence

Saving lives in the ICU through artificial intelligence
Two years ago, Gal Salomon’s mother developed sepsis during a stay in the hospital. “It was a big hospital with a lot of patients and no one saw or understood it was happening,” Salomon recalls bitterly. “We lost her after two days.”

So when Salomon, then a partner at Israeli venture capital firm Pitango, was introduced to Clew Medical, he knew immediately that he had to get involved. Clew develops software that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to predict which patients in a hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) are at the highest risk of imminent deterioration, and it alerts staff so they can intervene early.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Researchers bring high res magnetic resonance imaging to nanometer scale

Researchers bring high res magnetic resonance imaging to nanometer scale
A new technique that brings magnetic resonance imaging to the nanometer scale with unprecedented resolution will open the door for major advances in understanding new materials, virus particles and proteins that cause diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

Researchers at the Institute for Quantum Computing at the University of Waterloo used a new type of hardware and numerical algorithms to implement high-precision spin control, which allowed them to image proton spins with a resolution below 2nm.

By Waterloo - Wednesday, February 21, 2018

A Great View, But Will it Kill You?

A Great View, But Will it Kill You?
What is the greatest threat to having a heart attack, the nation’s number one killer? Ask this question and most people will answer it’s having high blood cholesterol. Or they respond, it’s due to hypertension, obesity, diabetes, or a stressful lifestyle.

But suppose you ask what things will improve the chance of surviving coronary attack? I’d predict that after some hesitation the answer will be having someone nearby to administer cardio-pulmonary respiration (CPR).  But how many will know it depends on the floor you’re living on in a high rise building? And what should you know about the 26th floor?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Nanotechnology could redefine oral surgery

Nanotechnology could redefine oral surgery
A trip to the dentist or orthodontist usually instills a sense of dread in most patients, and that’s before the exam even begins. Add to that the fear of oral surgery with a painful recovery, and many people will avoid these visits at all costs. Now, one group reports a pre-clinical study in ACS Nano showing that they could potentially reduce pain and recovery time with the aid of specialized nanotechnology.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, February 16, 2018