World

WhatFinger

Update on Iran: Continued Defiance, No Sanctions, and More Talk of Possible Military Action

By Emily B. Landau

Iran began a process of negotiations with the IAEA this summer with the aim of clearing up the lingering outstanding questions regarding its past nuclear activities. As always with Iran, this involves a complicated process, including pre-talks and then endless room for further conditions and clarifications down the road. Once again Iran dangles the bait of “cooperation” as a means of gaining valuable time for pressing its program forward. Russia and China, joined this time also by Germany, are unwilling to punish Iran with a third round of sanctions until it is clear how this process is evolving.

By INSS - Wednesday, October 24, 2007

DEMOCRACY, NOT “TWINS-CRACY”

imageWarsaw, Tuesday, October 23: Poles went to the polls on Sunday and the turnout was a record high since 1991:

53.8 percent (out of 30 million citizens registered, over 16 million cast valid votes). The October 21 snap elections in Poland could be the most important since the regime change in 1989. A majority of the voters, including most of the young ones, cast their ballots for the Civic Platform (PO), a pro-business center-right party (41.51 %), expressing their disillusionment with the two years of the rule of the Kaczynski Twins’ conservative Law and Justice (PiS) party and their bizarre coalition with the populist Self-Defense (Samoobrona) and the nationalist-right League of Polish Families (LPR). Yet, Law and Justice remains a strong opposition (32.11%).

By David M. Dastych - Tuesday, October 23, 2007

Can We Please Define “Racism”

James Watson, the geneticist who helped unravel the structure of DNA, came under fire for saying that Africans are not as intelligent as Westerners.  Aside from his remarks being deemed baseless and unscientific, he has quite predictably been labeled “racist.”  Why, some thought police even want him charged under Britain’s Orwellian “racial hatred laws” (Watson is conducting a speaking tour in Britain presently).

By Selwyn Duke - Monday, October 22, 2007

Blowing the Whistle on U.N. Corruption

On the eve of a Senate vote on the U.N.‘s Law of the Sea Treaty, a former senior staffer in one of the key institutions created by the treaty says that U.S. senators should have the complete and honest truth about mismanagement and financial corruption there. The International Seabed Authority, which is one of the main organizations created by the treaty, stands to receive millions of U.S. taxpayer dollars if the Senate ratifies the pact.

By Cliff Kincaid - Monday, October 22, 2007

Musharraf’s respect for press freedom

Although many are skeptical about Pakistani President General Pervez Musharraf’s commitment to democracy, even they agree the press has had more freedom under him than probably ever before. Even so, the press there walks a careful line through a minefield of military, political and religious influences.

By Guest Column Salah Uddin Shoaib Choudhury- Saturday, October 20, 2007

Benazir Bhutto and tales of Corruption

During her two terms in the office of Prime Minister in Pakistan, Benazir Bhutto, daughter of Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto acquired wealth and cash worth a few hundred million dollars, most of which is located in Europe and Middle East.

By Guest Column Salah Uddin Shoaib Choudhury- Friday, October 19, 2007

Scandal rocks UN Sea Treaty Organization

The dramatic case, Sam-Thambiah against the Secretary-General of the International Seabed Authority, involves allegations of sexual harassment and pornography. One side charges “distortions and fabrications.” The other side alleges “mismanagement and irregularities.” What makes this case unique is that it involves the shadowy world of a U.N.-affiliated agency that the U.S. Senate is poised to provide with millions of dollars through ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS).

By Cliff Kincaid - Thursday, October 18, 2007

Should Israel Swap Land For War or Peace

Israel and the Palestinian Authority (PA) are reportedly looking at swapping land in the West Bank for land in Israel as a means of overcoming the PA’s long standing demand that all 6,205 square kms of the West Bank be handed over to the PA by Israel as a necessary precondition for peace.

By David Singer - Wednesday, October 17, 2007

Another Pakistani political surprise

The recent U-turn of Pakistan’s military ruler Pervez Musharraf from punishing political big fish turns out to have been bogged down in the ocean. Political critics and analysts are seeing this as the great victory of democracy over a military regime, while many feel that the Pakistani president finally had to abandon the idea of eliminating corruption, just for the sake of ensuring a few more years in power.

By Guest Column Salah Uddin Shoaib Choudhury- Tuesday, October 16, 2007

Are the U.S. and Turkey on a Collision Course

By Gallia Lindenstrauss

Turkish-American relations currently face two significant challenges.  One has to do with the Turkish inclination to enter northern Iraq in order to deal with Kurdish Workers’ Party (PKK) fighters operating there.

By INSS - Monday, October 15, 2007

The Rise and Fall of Vicente Fox: A Five-Hour Thriller

Former Mexican president Vicente Fox spent most of last week sticking his intrusive nose into matters that are the exclusive domain of the American people and elected representatives, and which are absolutely none of the business of Mexico, it’s current president, or any former Mexican president.

By John Lillpop - Monday, October 15, 2007


Sudan on the Brink of Another Disaster

The Washington-DC based human rights group, International Christian Concern (ICC) http://www.persecution.org has learned that, in a dramatic development, the Sudanese Peoples Liberation Movement (SPLM), the party that represents the interest of Southern Sudan, made an announcement to withdraw from the National Unity Government of Sudan. This decision, which was made yesterday, could lead to another war between the Southern Sudanese and the Government of Sudan.

By Guest Column - Saturday, October 13, 2007

Eurocrats Target Poland

Last Thursday, Viscount Etienne Davignon, a Belgian who is the chairman of the secretive Bilderberg Group, celebrated his 75th birthday. Mr. Davignon is a former vice president of the European Commission and the author of the 1970 “Davignon Report” that laid the foundations for a common European foreign policy.

By Guest Column Paul Belien- Thursday, October 11, 2007

Bald-Faced Lies About the U.N.

Do you think our “adversary press” is on the lookout for government lies? Consider the false testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee by Deputy Secretary of State John Negroponte on behalf of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). This is a treaty that our media want passed by the Senate. So they are letting his lies go completely unchallenged.

By Cliff Kincaid - Thursday, October 11, 2007

White farmers in court for growing crops

By Peta Thornycroft, in Johannesburg, The Telegraph

Ten white farmers appeared in court in Zimbabwe yesterday accused of growing crops on their land—in a country where millions of people will need food aid within the next few months.

By Guest Column - Wednesday, October 10, 2007

German Jews: Drop Iranian-born soccer player who won’t play in Israel

By Assaf Uni (Berlin) and Anshel Pfeffer, Haaretz Correspondents and Reuters
Germany’s leading Jewish organization has called for an Iranian-born player to be dropped from Germany’s under-21 national soccer team for withdrawing from an upcoming match against Israel.

By Guest Column - Wednesday, October 10, 2007

Bush Ambushed by Arab Perfidy

President Bush, supposedly the world’s most powerful man, is being humiliated and hung out to dry by the Palestinian Authority and the Arab League as they use their collective muscle to try and change the focus and possibly cause the cancellation of next month’s international meeting called by the President.

By David Singer - Wednesday, October 10, 2007

Negotiations with the Palestinians: An Inevitable Failure or a Chance for Change

By Amir Kulick
Over the last few weeks Israeli prime minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen) have conducted political discussions meant to culminate in a joint declaration according to the Israeli approach, or in an agreement on principles according to the Palestinian approach.

By INSS - Monday, October 8, 2007


Jesus to Judas

For 15 years, Michel Aoun and the Free Patriotic Movement were the symbol, the inspiration, and the dream of Free Lebanon. The flame was kept alive through the few pure souls who believed in something greater than themselves; Free Lebanon. During those dark years, Michel Aoun was revered as our Nelson Mandela, or Che Guevara, our George Washington.

By Guest Column Charles Jalkh/Freedom Fighter- Monday, October 8, 2007

Barroso and Bilderberg to the Rescue of Belgium. Will the UK Be Ousted from the EU

Today, day 119 since the general elections of June 10th, Belgium still has no government. Belgium’s politicians, however, expect the country to have a new government soon. Yves Leterme, the leader of the Flemish Christian-Democrats, who last week was reappointed as “formateur” (Prime Minister Designate) by Belgium’s King Albert II, knows that he has no choice but to succeed in forming a government. If he does not, his political career is over. Mr Leterme, who won last June’s elections on a pro-Flemish platform, will have to withdraw all the Flemish demands because the Walloon politicians have vetoed them all.

By Guest Column Paul Belien- Sunday, October 7, 2007

How Benazir played into Musharraf’s hands

imageISLAMABAD: Even before the Supreme Court ruled that the presidential election should go ahead as planned, President Pervez Musharraf had emerged a political winner.

Musharraf had successfully taken revenge on Zulfikar Ali Bhutto by destroying the traditional political role of the Pakistan People’s Party, founded in 1967 against a military dictator, General Ayub Khan.

By Hamid Mir - Sunday, October 7, 2007

Yves Leterme Is Too Soft. Will Flanders Join EFTA?

113 days after the general elections of June 10th, Belgium still has no government. On Saturday evening, King Albert II reappointed Yves Leterme, the leader of the Flemish Christian-Democrat Party and the winner of last June’s elections, as “formateur” (Prime Minister Designate).

By Guest Column Paul Belien- Sunday, October 7, 2007

U.N. should keep tyrants off the stage

In Burma, an ominous silence has fallen. The ruling military junta has been answering the peaceful protests of dissident monks with beatings, arrests and untold killings. Even United Nations Human Rights Commissioner Louise Arbour, too often reticent about criticizing tyrannies, issued a statement Monday deploring the repression and asserting that in the current crackdown, Burma’s protesters “have become invisible.”

By Claudia Rosett - Sunday, October 7, 2007

An Oil for Food Expose

Having stood trial for almost a month in a Manhattan federal courtroom, 83-year-old Texas tycoon Oscar S. Wyatt Jr. struck a deal Monday. He pleaded guilty to conspiracy to defraud the United Nations’ former Oil for Food program for Iraq.

By Claudia Rosett - Wednesday, October 3, 2007

The Saffron Bloggers Strike Back

For the past two months or so we’ve watched with a sort of horrified fascination as the country of Myanmar (Burma) has deteriorated into a mess of bloody and fatal riots, and an oppression of its people akin to the horror stories from countries like North Korea and Cambodia.

The catalyst was the dramatic increase in the prices of everyday goods and fuel, with fuel jumping sometimes a massive 100%.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, October 3, 2007

Myanmar and Israel—Fighting the Semantic Wars

Is it “Myanmar” or “Burma”? “Yangon” or “Rangoon”?

Burma and its major city Rangoon were renamed Myanmar and Yangon in 1989 by the military junta that had seized power there at that time.

By David Singer - Wednesday, October 3, 2007

The LOST Colony

In promoting their latest cause, liberals have managed to enlist a member of a small group getting smaller by the year—conservatives in academia. “Academics did not get anywhere near this,” John Norton Moore of the University of Virginia told an audience at the Heritage Foundation on June 22 of the the United Nations’ Law of the Sea Treaty (LOST) that would give the UN control over seven-tenths of the earth’s surface.

By Malcolm Kline - Tuesday, October 2, 2007

The British anomaly: The attempt to abolish England

Ever heard of the West Lothian Question? West Lothian is the Scottish region immediately to the west of Edinburgh. The question is so called because it was first posed by Tam Dalyell, a Labor member of the British Parliament for West Lothian. Mr. Dalyell wondered how long the English would tolerate the situation in which Scottish members of the British Parliament, such as himself, have a (sometimes decisive) say about issues affecting only England, while English parliamentarians have no say about the same matters in Scotland.

By Guest Column Paul Belien- Monday, October 1, 2007

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