American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

“Miracle material” graphene is thinnest known anti-corrosion coating

May 2, 2012 — American Chemical Society

ACS Nano

New research has established the “miracle material” called graphene as the world’s thinnest known coating for protecting metals against corrosion. Their study on this potential new use of graphene appears in ACS Nano.


Unmasking black pepper’s secrets as a fat fighter

May 2, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

A new study provides a long-sought explanation for the beneficial fat-fighting effects of black pepper. The research, published in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, pinpoints piperine — the pungent-tasting substance that gives black pepper its characteristic taste, concluding that piperine also can block the formation of new fat cells.


Writing a landmark sequel to “The Book of Life”

May 2, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Journal of Proteome Research

Scientists are announcing the roadmap, policies and procedures for an ambitious international project that aims to compile a landmark sequel to “The Book of Life.” The follow-up to the Human Genome Project, which decoded all of the genes that make up humans, involves identifying and profiling all of the proteins produced by the thousands of genes bundled together in all of the human chromosomes. Called the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP), it is the topic of an article in ACS’ Journal of Proteome Research.


First “microsubmarines” designed to help clean up oil spills

May 2, 2012 — American Chemical Society

ACS Nano

Scientists are reporting development and successful testing of the first self-propelled “microsubmarines” designed to pick up droplets of oil from contaminated waters and transport them to collection facilities. The report concludes that these tiny machines could play an important role in cleaning up oil spills, like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon incident in the Gulf of Mexico. It appears in the journal ACS Nano.


Chronicling pink slime’s fall from grace

Apr 25, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Chemical & Engineering News

The process for producing what has become known as “pink slime” actually seemed like a triumph of technology in an industry haunted by the specter of food poisoning and, at one point, even got rave reviews in the news media, according to an article in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News. C&EN is the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.


Shift to green energy sources could mean crunch in supply of scarce metals

Apr 25, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Environmental Science & Technology

A large-scale shift from coal-fired electric power plants and gasoline-fueled cars to wind turbines and electric vehicles could increase demand for two already-scarce metals — available almost exclusively in China — by 600-2,600 percent over the next 25 years, a new study has concluded.


Beyond stain-resistant: New fabric coating actively shrugs off gunk

Apr 25, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Langmuir

Scientists are reporting development and successful testing of a fabric coating that would give new meaning to the phrase “stain-resistant” — a coating that would take an active role in sloughing off grease, dirt, strong acids and other gunk. The report, which shows that the coating is even more water-repellent than car wax or Teflon, appears in ACS’ journal Langmuir.


A new “Achilles’ heel” in fungus that causes dandruff

Apr 25, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

Research on the fungus that ranks as one cause of dandruff — the embarrassing nuisance that, by some accounts, afflicts half of humanity — is pointing scientists toward a much-needed new treatment for the condition’s flaking and itching. The advance is the topic of a report in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.


Pig stomach mucins are effective as anti-viral agents for consumer products

Apr 25, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Scientists are reporting that the mucus lining the stomachs of pigs could be a long-sought, abundant source of “mucins” being considered for use as broad-spectrum anti-viral agents to supplement baby formula and for use in personal hygiene and other consumer products to protect against a range of viral infections. Their study appears in ACS’ journal Biomacromolecules.


Beyond the blue bins: New American Chemical Society video on recycling

Apr 19, 2012 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, April 19, 2012 — Just in time for Sunday’s celebration of Earth Day, the American Chemical Society (ACS) today released a video revealing the journey that recyclable materials take beyond those blue curbside bins. In the latest episode of ACS’ award-winning Bytesize Science series, viewers take a tour of a typical recycling center to see how these facilities sort the mountains of recyclables they receive every day. The video is available at www.BytesizeScience.com.


A sea of challenges for the Mediterranean Sea

Apr 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Chemical & Engineering News

Cradle of great ancient civilizations, superhighway for trade and transport, treasure-trove of biodiversity, the Mediterranean — the world’s best known sea — faces a sea of challenges in the 21st century, including climate change, pollution, tourism and overfishing. That’s the topic of the cover story in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.


Handheld device for doing blood tests moves closer to medical use

Apr 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Analytical Chemistry

Scientists are reporting a key advance in efforts to develop a handheld device that could revolutionize the complete blood cell count (CBC), one of the most frequently performed blood tests used to diagnose and treat disease. In a report in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry, they describe adding a key feature to their “blood lab-on-a-chip” that allows it to count white blood cells more accurately.


New insights into when beach sand may become unsafe for digging and other contact

Apr 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Environmental Science & Technology

With summer days at the beach on the minds of millions of winter-weary people, a new study provides health departments with information needed to determine when levels of disease-causing bacteria in beach sand could pose a risk to children and others who dig or play in the sand. The report appears in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology.


Real-life scientific tail of the first “electrified snail”

Apr 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

The world’s first “electrified snail” has joined the menagerie of cockroaches, rats, rabbits and other animals previously implanted with biofuel cells that generate electricity — perhaps for future spy cameras, eavesdropping microphones and other electronics — from natural sugar in their bodies. Scientists are describing how their new biofuel cell worked for months in a free-living snail in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.


Could “advanced” dinosaurs rule other planets?

Apr 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

In the report, noted scientist Ronald Breslow, Ph.D., discusses the century-old mystery of why the building blocks of terrestrial amino acids (which make up proteins), sugars, and the genetic materials DNA and RNA exist mainly in one orientation or shape. There are two possible orientations, left and right, which mirror each other in the same way as hands. This is known as “chirality.” In order for life to arise, proteins, for instance, must contain only one chiral form of amino acids, left or right. With the exception of a few bacteria, amino acids in all life on Earth have the left-handed orientation. Most sugars have a right-handed orientation. How did that so-called homochirality, the predominance of one chiral form, happen?


Greening up the blue dye in jeans, police uniforms and the red, white & blue

Apr 4, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Chemical & Engineering News

Efforts are underway to develop a more environmentally friendly process for dyeing denim with indigo, the storied “king of dyes,” used to the tune of 50,000 tons annually to color cotton blue jeans and hundreds of other products. That effort is the topic of an article in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN). C&EN is the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.


Advance toward an imaging agent for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease

Apr 4, 2012 — American Chemical Society

ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters

Scientists are reporting development and initial laboratory tests of an imaging agent that shows promise for detecting the tell-tale signs of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in the brain — signs that now can’t confirm a diagnosis until after patients have died. Their report appears in the journal ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters.


Carbon nanotubes can double growth of cell cultures important in industry

Apr 4, 2012 — American Chemical Society

ACS Nano

A dose of carbon nanotubes more than doubles the growth rate of plant cell cultures — workhorses in the production of everything from lifesaving medications to sweeteners to dyes and perfumes — researchers are reporting. Their study, the first to show that carbon nanotubes boost plant cell division and growth, appears in the journal ACS Nano.


Some “improved cookstoves” may emit more pollution than traditional mud cookstoves

Apr 4, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Environmental Science & Technology

The first real-world, head-to-head comparison of “improved cookstoves” (ICs) and traditional mud stoves has found that some ICs may at times emit more of the worrisome “black carbon,” or soot, particles that are linked to serious health and environmental concerns than traditional mud stoves or open-cook fires. The report, which raises concerns about the leading hope as a clean cooking technology in the developing world, appears in ACS’ journal Environmental Science &Technology.


Defying conventional wisdom, water can float on oil

Apr 4, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Langmuir

Defying thousands of years of conventional wisdom, scientists are reporting that it is possible for water to float on oil, a discovery they say has important potential applications in cleaning up oil spills that threaten seashores and fisheries. Their report appears in ACS’ journal Langmuir.