American Chemical Society


American Chemical Society, ACS is a congressionally chartered independent membership organization which represents professionals at all degree levels and in all fields of chemistry and sciences that involve chemistry.

Most Recent Articles by American Chemical Society:

Adapting personal glucose monitors to detect DNA

Feb 29, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Analytical Chemistry

An inexpensive device used by millions of people with diabetes could be adapted into a home DNA detector that enables individuals to perform home tests for viruses and bacteria in human body fluids, in food and in other substances, scientists are reporting in a new study. The report on this adaptation of the ubiquitous personal glucose monitor, typically used to test blood sugar levels, appears in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry.


New hybrid “NOSH aspirin” as possible anti-cancer drug

Feb 29, 2012 — American Chemical Society

ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters

Scientists have combined two new “designer” forms of aspirin into a hybrid substance that appears more effective than either of its forebears in controlling the growth of several forms of cancer in laboratory tests. Their report on the new NOSH-aspirin, so named because it releases nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S), appears in the journal ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters.


Lessons from an $800-million drug flop may lead to a new genre of anti-cholesterol medicines

Feb 22, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Chemical & Engineering News

Mindful of lessons from a failed heart drug that cost $800 million to develop, drug companies are taking another shot at new medications that boost levels of so-called “good cholesterol,” which removes cholesterol from the body. A report on how three new versions of medications in the same family as the failed torcetrapib appears in the current edition of Chemical & Engineering News, the news magazine of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.


Dried licorice root fights the bacteria that cause tooth decay and gum disease

Feb 22, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Scientists are reporting identification of two substances in licorice — used extensively in Chinese traditional medicine — that kill the major bacteria responsible for tooth decay and gum disease, the leading causes of tooth loss in children and adults. In a study in ACS’ Journal of Natural Products, they say that these substances could have a role in treating and preventing tooth decay and gum disease.


“Miracle material” graphene is thinnest known anti-corrosion coating

Feb 22, 2012 — American Chemical Society

New research has established the “miracle material” called graphene as the world’s thinnest known coating for protecting metals against corrosion. Their study on this potential new use of graphene appears in ACS Nano.


MOFs special review issue

Feb 22, 2012 — American Chemical Society

New analyses of more than 4,000 scientific studies have concluded that a family of “miracle materials” called MOFs have a bright future in products and technologies — ranging from the fuel tanks in hydrogen-powered cars to muting the effects of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide — that are critical for solving some of the greatest global challenges of the 21st century. The 18 articles examining 4,283 pieces of research on MOFs published in the past appear in a special edition of the ACS’ journal Chemical Reviews.


New way to tap largest remaining treasure trove of potential new antibiotics

Feb 22, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Scientists are reporting use of a new technology for sifting through the world’s largest remaining pool of potential antibiotics to discover two new antibiotics that work against deadly resistant microbes, including the “super bugs” known as MRSA. Their report appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.


New crime-fighting tools aim to deter and nab terrorists

Feb 8, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Chemical & Engineering News

Fingerprints, ballistics, DNA analysis and other mainstays of the forensic science toolkit may get a powerful new crime-solving companion as scientists strive to develop technology for “fingerprinting” and tracing the origins of chemical substances that could be used in terrorist attacks and other criminal acts. That’s the topic of the cover story in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.? ?


New process could advance use of healthy cells or stem cells to treat disease

Feb 8, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Langmuir

In a discovery that may help speed use of “cell therapy” — with normal cells or stem cells infused into the body to treat disease — scientists are reporting development of a way to deliver therapeutic human cells to diseased areas within the body using a simple magnetic effect. Their report appears in ACS’ journal Langmuir.


Arsenic criticality poses concern for modern technology

Feb 8, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Environmental Science & Technology

Risks related to the critical nature of arsenic — used to make high-speed computer chips that contain gallium arsenide — outstrip those of other substances in a group of critical materials needed to sustain modern technology, a new study has found. Scientists evaluated the relative criticality of arsenic and five related metals in a report in the ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology.


“Shish kebab” structure provides improved form of “buckypaper”

Feb 8, 2012 — American Chemical Society

ACS Nano

Scientists are reporting development of a new form of buckypaper, which eliminates a major drawback of these sheets of carbon nanotubes — 50,000 times thinner than a human hair, 10 times lighter than steel, but up to 250 times stronger — with potential uses ranging from body armor to next-generation batteries. Their report appears in the journal ACS Nano.


Will bubble-powered microrockets zoom through the human stomach?

Feb 8, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Journal of the American Chemical Society

Scientists have developed a new kind of tiny motor — which they term a “microrocket” — that can propel itself through acidic environments, such as the human stomach, without any external energy source, opening the way to a variety of medical and industrial applications. Their report in the Journal of the American Chemical Society describes the microrockets traveling at virtual warp speed for such devices. A human moving at the same speed would have to run at a clip of 400 miles per hour.


ACS Nano Letters co-editors A. Paul Alivisatos and Charles M. Lieber win prestigious Wolf Foundation

Jan 19, 2012 — American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON,  — A. Paul Alivisatos, Ph.D., and Charles M. Lieber, Ph.D., co-editors of the American Chemical Society (ACS) peer-reviewed journal, Nano Letters, are among eight winners of the prestigious Wolf Prize for 2012.


Outlook for an industry that touches 96 percent of all manufactured goods

Jan 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

The chemical industry, which touches 96 percent of all manufactured goods, is seeing some positive signs for 2012, although the overall outlook is not very rosy. Growing demand for chemicals used in agriculture, electronics, cars and airplanes will boost an industry that generates $674 billion in sales in the U.S. alone, but expiring patents and global economic woes will take a toll. These forecasts and others are in the cover story in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.


Tear drops may rival blood drops in testing blood sugar in diabetes

Jan 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Scientists are reporting development and successful laboratory testing of an electrochemical sensor device that has the potential to measure blood sugar levels from tears instead of blood — an advance that could save the world’s 350 million diabetes patients the discomfort of pricking their fingers for droplets of blood used in traditional blood sugar tests. Their report appears in ACS’ journal Analytical Chemistry.


Advance toward an imaging agent for diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease

Jan 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Scientists are reporting development and initial laboratory tests of an imaging agent that shows promise for detecting the tell-tale signs of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in the brain — signs that now can’t confirm a diagnosis until after patients have died. Their report appears in the journal ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters.


Why do dew drops do what they do on leaves?

Jan 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Nobel laureate poet Rabindranath Tagore once wrote, “Let your life lightly dance on the edges of time like dew on the tip of a leaf.” Now, a new study is finally offering an explanation for why small dew drops do as Tagore advised and form on the tips, rather than the flat surfaces, of leaves. It appears in ACS’ journal Langmuir.


Why coffee drinking reduces the risk of Type 2 diabetes

Jan 11, 2012 — American Chemical Society

Why do heavy coffee drinkers have a lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, a disease on the increase around the world that can lead to serious health problems? Scientists are offering a new solution to that long-standing mystery in a report in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry.