Fraser Institute


The Fraser Institute is an independent Canadian public policy research and educational organization with offices in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, and Montreal and ties to a global network of 86 think-tanks. Its mission is to measure, study, and communicate the impact of competitive markets and government intervention on the welfare of individuals. To protect the Institute’s independence, it does not accept grants from governments or contracts for research. Visit fraserinstitute.org.Follow the Fraser Institute on Twitter | Like us on Facebook

Most Recent Articles by Fraser Institute:

Rate of small business startups in Canada down nearly 50 per cent in 30 years

May 17, 2018 — Fraser Institute

VANCOUVER—The growth rate of small business startups in Canada—a key measure of entrepreneurial activity—is on the decline due, in part, to the country’s aging population, finds a new book released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Entrepreneurs drive innovation and technological advancement, but as Canada’s population ages, there are proportionately fewer entrepreneurial risk-takers, which can have negative effects on the economy,” said Steve Globerman, Fraser Institute senior fellow and contributing editor of Demographics and Entrepreneurship: Mitigating the Effects of an Aging Population.




Lack of pipelines will cost Canada $15.8 billion this year

May 8, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Lack of pipelines will cost Canada $15.8 billion this year
CALGARY—A shortage of pipeline capacity is driving down the price of Canadian oil and will cost the country’s energy sector CAD$15.8 billion in lost revenues this year, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Without adequate pipelines to tidewater ports, Canadian oil producers are forced to sell their product in the U.S. at dramatically discounted prices, which results in substantial losses for the energy sector and the economy more broadly,” said Kenneth Green, senior director of natural resource studies at the Fraser Institute.


Expanded Canada Pension Plan could decrease investment in Canada by up to $114 billion over next dec

May 3, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Expanded Canada Pension Plan could decrease investment in Canada by up to $114 billion over next decade
VANCOUVER—By forcing Canadian workers to contribute more to the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), Ottawa and the provinces will inadvertently shrink the pool of money available for investments in Canada—potentially up to $114 billion by 2030, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“A shrinking pool of domestic investment means there will potentially be less money available in Canada to finance start-up businesses, the maintenance and expansion of existing operations, and investments in new machines and technology—all of which are critical for improving the economy and the living standards of workers,” said Charles Lammam, director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute and co-author of Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment.


Canada Health Act a barrier to reform and better universal health care

May 2, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canada Health Act a barrier to reform and better universal health care
VANCOUVER—The Canada Health Act (CHA) prevents provinces from implementing proven health-care reforms that would improve the system and shorten wait times, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The CHA is a federal law that sets the rules around cash transfers from Ottawa to the provinces for health care. It also allows the federal government to withhold funds from any province deemed in violation of the Canada Health Act.


Reducing Ontario’s personal, corporate income tax rates to 8% would attract investment, top ta

Apr 24, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Time for Tax Reform in Ontario
TORONTO—An eight per cent single-rate tax on personal and corporate income would make Ontario one of the most competitive pro-growth tax jurisdictions in North America, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Ontario’s economy has struggled for many years, partly because uncompetitive tax rates discourage businesses and entrepreneurs from moving here and investing in the province,” said Ben Eisen, director of the Fraser Institute’s Ontario Prosperity Initiative and co-author of Time for Tax Reform in Ontario.


Poor policies largely to blame for Ontario’s skyrocketing electricity prices

Apr 12, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Poor policies largely to blame for Ontario’s skyrocketing electricity prices
TORONTO—Poor energy policy choices—including Ontario’s Green Energy Act—have increased electricity prices for residents, cost tens of thousands of manufacturing workers their jobs and produced only minimal health and environmental benefits, finds a new collection of essays released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Ontario is a prime example of how not to manage energy policy—extreme government interference in the electricity market has made life more unaffordable for Ontarians and damaged the province’s economy,” said Kenneth Green, senior director of natural resource studies at the Fraser Institute and a contributing author of Understanding Changes in Ontario’s Electricity Markets and Their Effects.


Canada’s health-care system stands in stark contrast to more successful universal systems worl

Mar 20, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canada’s health-care system stands in stark contrast to more successful universal systems worldwide
VANCOUVER—Canada’s approach to health policy is much more restrictive than in other developed countries with more successful universal health-care systems, notably on the use of the private sector and patient cost-sharing, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Previous research has shown Canada ranks among the top spenders on health care internationally but ranks poorly on a number of key performance indicators.


Ontario needs more than one year of improved economic growth to make-up for stagnant decade

Mar 15, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Ontario needs more than one year of improved economic growth to make-up for stagnant decade
TORONTO—Despite upbeat government rhetoric, Ontario’s economic growth in 2017 was not enough to repair the damage done during the preceding decade when the province’s economic performance was among the worst in Canada, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Over the course of a decade, Ontario was near the bottom of the heap for private sector job-creation, economic growth and increases in household income. The recent uptick in growth is good news, but given the length of Ontario’s slump, it’s far too early to celebrate,” said Ben Eisen, director of the Fraser Institute’s Ontario Prosperity Initiative and co-author of Ontario’s Lost Decade: 2007-2016.


Embracing commerce, economic opportunities raises living standards, incomes—Fort McKay First Nation

Mar 1, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Embracing commerce and economic opportunities raises living standards and incomes for Fort McKay First Nation members
CALGARY—By seizing business opportunities, Fort McKay First Nation in northern Alberta has markedly improved the living standards of its members and raised its average after-tax income to more than $73,000—much higher than the national average, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think tank.

“Fort McKay is a success story, not just among First Nations, but all communities across Canada, and proof that sound political and economic leadership can dramatically improve living standards in big cities or rural settings,” said Tom Flanagan, Fraser Institute senior fellow, professor emeritus of political science at the University of Calgary and author of The Community Capitalism of the Fort McKay First Nation: A Case Study.


Ottawa’s plan is not working; budget ignores major economic challenges

Feb 27, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Ottawa’s plan is not working; budget ignores major economic challenges
VANCOUVER—Despite the rhetoric coming from Ottawa, the federal government’s plan of deficit spending and higher taxes is not working and today’s budget ignores the serious economic challenges facing Canada, according to Charles Lammam, director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Instead of responding swiftly and decisively to the headwinds facing the Canadian economy, the federal government has ignored them,” Lammam said.


Ottawa could balance budget in 2019 (as promised) with modest spending reduction

Feb 24, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Ottawa could balance budget in 2019 (as promised) with modest spending reduction
VANCOUVER—The Liberal government could still balance the federal budget by 2019/20—a promise Prime Minister Justin Trudeau made during the 2015 election campaign—by reducing program spending by just one per cent over the next two years, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The federal government is expected to table the 2018/19 budget next week.


More than 80 Ontario high schools show improvement in math, despite worrying trend province-wide

Feb 18, 2018 — Fraser Institute

More than 80 Ontario high schools show improvement in math, despite worrying trend province-wide
TORONTO—Despite recent headlines about disappointing math scores in province-wide testing across Ontario, some secondary schools are bucking the trend, according to the Fraser Institute’s annual Report Card on Ontario’s Secondary Schools, 2018 released today.


How are Canadians at risk from counterfeit pharmaceuticals?

Feb 8, 2018 — Fraser Institute

How are Canadians at risk from counterfeit pharmaceuticals?
VANCOUVER—Counterfeit pharmaceutical drugs pose a real risk to Canadians because they are showing up in brick-and-mortar pharmacies, not just on the street and online, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Pharmaceutical counterfeiting is a growing problem around the world, including Canada—no medicine is immune, and the consequences can be deadly,” said Kristina Acri, Fraser Institute senior fellow, associate professor of economics at Colorado College and author of Pharmaceutical Counterfeiting: Endangering Public Health, Society, and the Economy.


Pre-election spending increase at Queen’s Park tops $7 billion, highest since 2009 recession

Feb 6, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Pre-election spending increase at Queen’s Park tops $7 billion, highest since 2009 recession
TORONTO—The Ontario government is ramping up program spending by more than $7 billion this year, or nearly six per cent—more than three times higher than the average increase in the years following the 2009 recession, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Ontario remains heavily indebted, so there are big risks associated with ramping up program spending again, but that’s exactly what the Wynne government is doing,” said Ben Eisen, director of the Fraser Institute’s Ontario Prosperity Initiative and co-author of Repeating Past Mistakes? Spending Restraint Critical for Ontario’s Fiscal Health.


Recession could push federal deficit to between $46 and $120 billion by 2020/21

Feb 1, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Recession could push federal deficit to between $46 and $120 billion by 2020/21
VANCOUVER—With the federal government running deficits during times of positive economic growth, Ottawa’s annual deficit could reach $120 billion in the next few years if Canada enters a recession, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“By running deficits in good times, if and when Canada’s economy slows down—or worse, hits a recession—there’s a very real risk Canada’s existing deficits could grow substantially,” said Jason Clemens, executive vice-president of the Fraser Institute and co-author of Federal Deficits and Recession: What Could Happen.


Canada falls out of top 10 freest countries, U.S. up seven spots to 17th

Jan 25, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canada falls out of top 10 freest countries, U.S. up seven spots to 17th
TORONTO—Canada is no longer one of the 10 freest countries in the world, having dropped from fourth to 11th in the new Human Freedom Index, released today by the Fraser Institute and a network of international public policy think-tanks.

The United States, which ranked 24th last year, climbed to 17th in the most recent report, which uses 79 indicators of personal, civil and economic freedoms to rank 159 countries and territories around the world.


Canada has almost 20 per cent fewer doctors per capita than OECD average

Jan 18, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canada has almost 20 per cent fewer doctors per capita than OECD average
VANCOUVER—The number of doctors in Canada (per person) lags far behind other developed countries, and if current trends continue, Canada likely won’t close the gap in the coming years, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Physicians play a crucial role in Canada’s health-care system, but compared to other developed countries, Canada has a low ratio of physicians to people,” said Steven Globerman, international business professor at Western Washington University, Fraser Institute senior fellow and co-author of The Supply of Physicians in Canada: Projections and Assessment.


Unemployment rate now less reflective of overall labour market performance due to demographics

Jan 16, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Unemployment rate now less reflective of overall labour market performance due to demographics

VANCOUVER—A falling unemployment rate will not necessarily indicate a healthy growing labour market in the future, in part because Canada’s population is getting older and more Canadians are retiring from the workforce, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Historically, the unemployment rate and the employment rate worked in tandem—when one went up, the other went down—but that’s not always true anymore,” said Jason Clemens, executive vice-president of the Fraser Institute and co-author of Why the Unemployment Rate is No Longer a Reliable Gauge of Labour Market Performance.


CPP tax increase and Ottawa’s income tax changes mean higher taxes for virtually every Canadia

Jan 11, 2018 — Fraser Institute

 CPP tax increase and Ottawa’s income tax changes mean higher taxes for virtually every Canadian family  class=
VANCOUVER—More than 90 per cent of Canadian families with children will pay higher taxes once the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) tax increases are fully implemented, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The first of seven increases to the CPP tax, which all workers must pay, will start this time next year.


Canada’s biggest cities much less dense than other major U.S., international urban centres

Jan 9, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canada’s biggest cities much less dense than other major U.S., international urban centres
TORONTO—Canadian cities—including Toronto and Vancouver, which are experiencing an affordability crunch—can accommodate much more housing supply as they have much lower population densities than other major urban centres around the world, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Compared to their international peers, Canadian cities have much lower levels of density, and thus an ability to expand the supply of housing,” said Josef Filipowicz, senior policy analyst with the Fraser Institute’s Centre for Municipal Studies and author of Room To Grow: Comparing Urban Density in Canada and Abroad.