Fraser Institute


The Fraser Institute is an independent Canadian public policy research and educational organization with offices in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, and Montreal and ties to a global network of 86 think-tanks. Its mission is to measure, study, and communicate the impact of competitive markets and government intervention on the welfare of individuals. To protect the Institute’s independence, it does not accept grants from governments or contracts for research. Visit fraserinstitute.org.Follow the Fraser Institute on Twitter | Like us on Facebook

Most Recent Articles by Fraser Institute:

China ranks 135th out of 162 in new Human Freedom Index; Canada ranks 5th

Dec 10, 2018 — Fraser Institute

China ranks 135th out of 162 in new Human Freedom Index; Canada ranks 5th
TORONTO—China continues to languish near the bottom of the annual Human Freedom Index released today by the Fraser Institute and a network of international public policy think-tanks.

New Zealand is the freest country in the world, followed by Switzerland (2nd).

China ranks 135th in this year’s index, which uses 79 indicators of personal, civil and economic freedoms to rank 162 countries and jurisdictions worldwide. Hong Kong, once the world’s freest jurisdiction several years running, continues its downward slide and this year ranks 3rd. Australia (4th) and Canada round out the top five.


Canadian taxpayers subsidize government pensions to the tune of $22 billion a year

Dec 6, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canadian taxpayers subsidize government pensions to the tune of $22 billion a year
VANCOUVER—Government employees don’t pay the full cost of their defined-benefit pensions. Taxpayers provide a $22 billion annual subsidy by assuming undisclosed investment risks for which they are not compensated, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.


Ontario’s health-care wait times no longer shortest in Canada

Dec 4, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Ontario’s health-care wait times no longer shortest in Canada
TORONTO—Ontario can no longer claim the shortest median wait time for medically necessary treatment in Canada, with patients in the province waiting an estimated 15.7 weeks (on average) in 2018, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Saskatchewan’s wait time of 15.4 weeks is the shortest in Canada this year, while the median wait time across Canada was 19.8 weeks.


Canadian provinces shut out of top 10 most-attractive jurisdictions for oil and gas investment in an

Nov 29, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canadian provinces shut out of top 10 most-attractive jurisdictions for oil and gas investment in annual survey
CALGARY—For the first time in more than five years, no Canadian province ranked in the top 10 most-attractive jurisdictions for oil and gas investment, according to an annual global survey of petroleum-sector executives released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan, Canadian public policy think-tank.


82% of freshwater monitoring stations in Canada report fair to excellent quality

Nov 27, 2018 — Fraser Institute

82% of freshwater monitoring stations in Canada report fair to excellent quality
VANCOUVER—Canada’s freshwater supply and water quality across the country is generally very good, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Canadians are rightly sensitive about the country’s water supply, and the good news is that, overall, the quantity and quality of Canada’s freshwater is quite good,” said Ross McKitrick, professor of economics at the University of Guelph, Fraser Institute senior fellow and co-author of Evaluating the State of Fresh Water in Canada.


Economic update must address Canada’s lack of business investment

Nov 19, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Economic update must address Canada’s lack of business investment
VANCOUVER—A host of economic measures indicate that Canada continues to underperform when it comes to business investment, which is crucial for improving living standards and generating prosperity, according to recent research published by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Finance Minister Bill Morneau is scheduled to release the federal government’s fall economic update on Wednesday, which could include changes to fiscal policy and send important signals to potential investors and entrepreneurs.


Canada among highest health-care spenders yet ranks near bottom on number of doctors, hospital beds

Nov 8, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canada among highest health-care spenders yet ranks near bottom on number of doctors, hospital beds and wait times
VANCOUVER—Despite spending more on health care than the majority of developed countries with universal coverage, Canada has a relatively short supply of doctors and hospital beds—and the longest wait times, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“There is a clear imbalance between the high cost of Canada’s health-care system and the value Canadians receive,” said Bacchus Barua, associate director of health policy studies at the Fraser Institute and co-author of Comparing Performance of Universal Health Care Countries, 2018.


Settling First Nation grievances could cost Ottawa almost $6 billion over next five years

Nov 6, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Settling First Nation grievances could cost Ottawa almost $6 billion over next five years
CALGARY—The cost to compensate Indigenous people for perceived past injustices could hit $5.7 billion over the next five years, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Ottawa’s plans to reconcile with Indigenous people include major financial costs, and Canadians should be aware of those costs,” said Tom Flanagan, Fraser Institute senior fellow, professor emeritus of political science at the University of Calgary and co-author of The Costs of the Canadian Government’s Reconciliation Framework for First Nations.


USMCA lost opportunity to actually implement freer trade between Canada and U.S.

Nov 1, 2018 — Fraser Institute

USMCA lost opportunity to actually implement freer trade between Canada and U.S.
VANCOUVER—The new United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA)—NAFTA’s recently-negotiated replacement—represents a missed opportunity to create freer trade across North America, according to a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“We had a chance with these negotiations to truly liberalize trade between Canada and the U.S., but that opportunity was squandered because both sides came to the table with a list of protected industries that were off-limits from the start,” said Gary Hufbauer, a senior fellow with the Peterson Institute for International Economics and co-author of The U.S.-Mexico-Canada-Agreement: Overview and Outlook.


Government employees in Ontario paid 10.6 per cent higher wages than comparable private-sector worke

Oct 24, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Government employees in Ontario paid 10.6 per cent higher wages than comparable private-sector workers
TORONTO—Government employees in Ontario received 10.6 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and enjoyed much more generous non-wage benefits, too, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Bringing government-sector compensation in line with the private sector would not only help governments in Ontario control spending without reducing services, it would also maintain fairness for taxpayers,” said Ben Eisen, Fraser Institute Senior Fellow and co-author of Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario.


Fed.government risks ignoring existing provincial drug insurance plans in push for national program

Oct 16, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Provincial Drug Coverage for Vulnerable Canadians
VANCOUVER—Despite widespread misperceptions, every province already provides prescription drug coverage to help Canadians—particularly seniors and lower-income Canadians—pay for pharmaceuticals, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Much of the discussion about a possible national pharmacare plan seemingly assumes there’s no existing government help for Canadians to pay for medicines they need—but that’s just not true,” said Bacchus Barua, associate director of health policy studies at the Fraser Institute and co-author of Provincial Drug Coverage for Vulnerable Canadians.


Recent growth rate of capital investment in the U.S. more than double Canada’s

Oct 11, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Capital Investment in Canada: An International Comparison
VANCOUVER—Canada’s anemic growth rate of capital investment—which has slowed to a 40-year low—has lagged behind growth rates in the United States and other developed countries in recent years, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Slowing rates of capital investment by business are particularly notable for Canada, which risks impeding economic growth and living standards,” said Steven Globerman, professor emeritus of economics at Western Washington University and co-author of Capital Investment in Canada: An International Comparison.


Cancelling contracts with wind, solar power providers would cut Ontario electricity bills by 24%

Oct 4, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Cancelling contracts with wind, solar power providers would cut Ontario electricity bills by 24%
TORONTO—If the Ontario government cancelled existing contracts with renewable energy generators such as wind and solar power, it could reduce electricity bills for Ontarians by 24 per cent, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Electricity costs in Ontario skyrocketed in recent years due to poor government policies, so it’s time for meaningful reforms to reduce the burden on Ontarians,” said Ross McKitrick, economics professor at the University of Guelph, senior fellow at the Fraser Institute and co-author of Electricity Reform in Ontario: Getting Power Prices Down.


Canada trails U.S. in annual economic freedom ranking

Sep 25, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Canada trails U.S. in annual economic freedom ranking
TORONTO—Canadians are less economically free than Americans—and the gap is widening, according to the Fraser Institute’s annual Economic Freedom of the World report released today.

The United States ranks 6th in this year’s index, while Canada is tied for 10th with Australia.


Major tax, labour and energy reforms needed to make Ontario competitive and open for business

Sep 19, 2018 — Fraser Institute

TORONTO—Ontario’s new provincial government has pledged to make Ontario “open for business,” but doing so will require significant reforms on taxes, electricity pricing and labour regulation, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“There’s no silver bullet for the wide range of problems facing Ontario, and making the province competitive again will require big changes on many different policy fronts,” said Ben Eisen, Fraser Institute senior fellow for Ontario prosperity studies and editor of Creating policy calling cards to attract business to Ontario.




Growth rate of capital investment in Canada hits 40-year low

Sep 13, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Growth rate of capital investment in Canada hits 40-year low
VANCOUVER—The growth rate of capital investment in Canada—particularly in the important areas of equipment, machinery and intellectual property—has slowed to a 40-year low, negatively affecting living standards for workers and overall economic growth, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.


Ontario’s labour market among worst in North America

Aug 30, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Ontario’s labour market among worst in North America
TORONTO—Ontario’s labour market performance—which includes the province’s job-creation record and unemployment rate—ranks among the worst in North America when compared to other Canadian provinces and U.S. states, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“With Labour Day around the corner, now is an opportune time to assess how well Ontario’s labour market stacks up against other Canadian and American jurisdictions,” said Ben Eisen, Fraser Institute senior fellow.


Ottawa’s drug-pricing changes threaten Canadians who suffer from rare diseases

Aug 28, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Ottawa’s drug-pricing changes threaten Canadians who suffer from rare diseases
TORONTO—The federal government’s plan to increasingly regulate the costs of pharmaceuticals could mean Canadians with cystic fibrosis and other rare diseases may soon lose access to new innovative drug treatments, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Starting next year, the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board (PMPRB)—a federal body that regulates the prices of all patented medicines in Canada—is planning to use new rules for establishing drug prices with the goal of lowering costs.


Ontario can balance budget while also cutting taxes

Aug 21, 2018 — Fraser Institute

Ontario can balance budget while also cutting taxes
TORONTO—Ontario’s new provincial government can balance the budget and even cut taxes, but it will require a focus on spending discipline, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“While Ontario’s deficit will likely be much larger than originally projected, the province needs to reduce and reform its tax system to make the province more competitive,” said Ben Eisen, Fraser Institute senior fellow and co-author of Restoring Ontario’s Public Finances.


The average Canadian family paid $37,058 in taxes last year—more than housing, food and clothi

Aug 14, 2018 — Fraser Institute

VANCOUVER—The average Canadian family spent 43 per cent of its income on taxes in 2017, more than housing, food and clothing costs combined, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Many Canadians will be surprised to learn that taxes—and not life’s basic necessities, including housing—is the biggest household expense,” said Charles Lammam, director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute and co-author of the Canadian Consumer Tax Index, which tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian family from 1961 to 2017.