Science-Technology

WhatFinger

Brilliant’s Brilliant Plan for Humanitarian Aid

I am a huge supporter of the Web2.0 project Twitter; it is fun, it is simple, and most of all it has implications ranging far wider than simple ego-blogging.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Saturday, January 19, 2008

Fingers pointing at old Crown Jewel thief

I have a soft spot in my heart for thieves, at least those that lead a Robin Hood type existence. So when historian Sean J. Murphy pointed the finger at Francis Shackleton, the brother of polar explorer Ernest, in the Irish Crown Jewels theft, I was a little bit happy.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Saturday, January 19, 2008

Yellowstone at risk of Hydrothermal explosion, not Volcanic

One of the USA’s greatest tourist destinations, Yellowstone National Park is more than just the home of Old Faithful. Yellowstone lies atop one of the world’s few dozen hotspots, just like Hawaii, and is home to the Yellowstone Caldera (a volcanic feature formed by the collapse of land following a volcanic eruption) which measures in at 55 kilometers by 72 kilometers.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Black Holes spinning near the Speed of Light

We’ve dedicated a lot of attention to black holes of late, with rogue holes roaming the universe and other holes shooting energy at harmless nearby galaxies. So it is not a surprise that the research keeps coming.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Wednesday, January 16, 2008

France Used to be a Jungle

The reason I started writing professionally for sites such as Daily Galaxy was, first and foremost, so that I could write my own fiction. It is a great tradeoff, don’t get me wrong; I get to write about that which interests me, dig into news, history and science like I would never have had the opportunity to prior. But I consider myself an ‘aspiring author’ first and foremost.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Another Inconvenient Truth

But this time, this inconvenient truth has nothing to do with our planet or how we’re treating it. According to results that were presented to the American Astronomical Society meeting in Austin, Texas last Tuesday, a spiral galaxy has been confirmed to have a pair of arms that are winding in the opposite direction from most galaxies.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, January 15, 2008

Gizmorons, or, How to give Bloggers a Bad Name in One Easy Step

The face of journalism has been undergoing a massive shift over the past several years. From the days where news could only be written by lay men and women with writing skills, things have changed. Now blogs and websites exist that allow the experts in all fields to speak for their own field. But the internet has also allowed the layman the chance to do the same, participating in a way that is reminiscent of the journalistic cadetships of yesteryear.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Tuesday, January 15, 2008



Bill Gates on the Second Age of Technology

You may have something against Microsoft – let’s be honest, who doesn’t? – but you have got to admire and love their soon to be ex-boss, Mr. Bill Gates.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 10, 2008

Solar Cycle 24 Heats Up

Looking to our skies is the job of your local weatherman, and for the most part, we thank them for it (despite the fact it still seems they don’t know what they’re doing). But our planet is affected by more than just terrestrial weather. Space weather also affects us here on planet Earth, and the driving force behind that, is the solar cycle.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 10, 2008

And The Winner Is… BLU-RAY!

Much to my disappointment, a winner has all but been chosen in the HD war, and Microsoft isn’t one of the winners (so, maybe it isn’t all bad?). And while there will still be some holdouts, and many sitting on the fence, we can officially call Blu-Ray the winner of the High Definition war.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 10, 2008

Plate Tectonics May Take the odd Millennia off!

Plate tectonics, geology, etc, is one of my passions. Being a journalist, my only real chance to indulge in it though is when it comes up in a story, such as this one.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Monday, January 7, 2008

The Dust that Formed us Has a Home

Dust is all the rage at the moment, thanks to Phillip Pullman’s widely popular His Dark Materials trilogy. But what of the dust that formed what we know and love today; the dust that, for all intents and purposes, we are all made from.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 3, 2008

Ancient Civilization Found

Reported at the end of last year, but missed pretty much everywhere, Russian archaeologists working in Kyrgyzstan have discovered the remains of, what must have been at its time, a thriving metropolis. Estimated to be from 2,500 years ago, they were found at the bottom of Lake Issyk Kul, in the Kyrgyz mountains.

By Guest Column Joshua Hill- Thursday, January 3, 2008