Justin Trudeau does not get this. In fact, he doesn’t get much—except for a personal tunnel-vision resulting from a sheltered upbringing within a cocoon of political privilege

Like Father, Like Son : Globalist Visions Of Justin & Pierre Trudeau


By —— Bio and Archives January 12, 2016

Comments | Print Friendly | Subscribe | Email Us

Generally, the concept of respect is a two-way street. From a political standpoint, governments must maintain a degree of respect for their citizens in order to receive respect in return. Unfortunately, a reciprocal relationship of this nature is very much lacking within contemporary Canadian politics.  In fact, a lack of respect is presently emanating from a rather questionable source— the Prime Minister of Canada.

Barely three months into a four year term, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has already revealed the level of respect he has for Canadian citizens— none whatsoever. Breaking campaign promises like a drunk breaks glasses at a tea party, Trudeau has revised or reneged on one campaign promise after another. Withdrawing jet fighters from the Middle East, fulfilling Syrian refugee quotas (are any of the refugees actually Syrian?), and legalizing weed are three which quickly come to mind.

Nor does our poster-boy Prime Minister show respect for those who voted him into office. Like father Pierre Trudeau— a former three-term leader of our nation— the value of public opinion is taking a back seat to personal egotism, irreverence and arrogance.

Have an opinion on voter reform? Please—don’t overwork you brain cells—Justin Trudeau doesn’t want to know about it. What he wants to know, and indeed does know, is that his proposal for federal voting reform will be an exclusive benefit to the Liberal party.

Truth be told, Trudeau Jr.’s leadership style has more in common with Mao Tse Tung or Fidel Castro than it does with John Diefenbaker, Mackenzie King, or any other former Prime Minister—save his famous father.

Speaking of Mao, many Canadians— our youth in particular— are likely unaware of the Trudeau tag-team admiration for the Peoples Republic of China. In fact, Pierre Trudeau was the first leader from a western nation to meet with Chairman Mao, founder of China’s communist “Cultural Revolution.” Apparently, Pierre picked up a few of Mao’s habits, as less than one year after visiting China in 1970 he informed Canadians that bi-culturalism— English and French Canadian culture specifically— was thereby dissolved, to be replaced with what he termed “multiculturalism within a bi-lingual framework.”

No public debate. No public input—save a handful of carefully selected special interest organizations. No referendum— regarding what has become the most transformative piece of government legislation in Canadian history.

Anti-military, anti-American, infatuated with socialism and communism, Pierre Trudeau was Canada’s first “globalist” state leader

In retrospect,  Pierre Trudeau’s unilateral decision-making exhibited an incredible lack of vision for the future of our nation. Yet, if his legacy is properly understood, this should come as no surprise.

Fiercely anti-nationalist—much of it in reaction to a growing separatist movement in Quebec—  Trudeau Sr. believed in a Canada united not by national identity, heritage or historical tradition, but rather by a singular concept—a belief in individual rights and freedoms for those living upon Canadian soil. Political associates and pundits who questioned his post-modern visions would soon find themselves on the receiving end of his personal wrath.

Similar dynamics applied to his approach to legislation. The Charter of Rights and Freedoms(1982)—not to mention the Multiculturalism Act itself(1988), were pushed through parliament with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer.

Anti-military, anti-American, infatuated with socialism and communism, Pierre Trudeau was Canada’s first “globalist” state leader—that is, until October 16th, 2015, when oldest son Justin was elected Prime Minister of Canada.

Justin Trudeau is not an original thinker. He does not possess the intelligence of his father, nor the economic acumen of his political predecessor, Stephen Harper. His political ideology is, in fact, hopelessly retrograde— an ill-conceived plan to return Canada to the nation it was under his man-about-the -world father. As if he, or any other current leader, could return our country to the “I’d like to teach the world to sing” ethos of the 1960s and 1970s.

It will never happen. The world has changed too much. The idealism of an era previous to terrorist bombings and voluntary suicides is not in the cards for Canada, nor any other western nation. People are afraid—afraid of being blown up while scanning their grocery list at a local deli. Afraid of attending a New Years Eve event which may only result in celebrating their last night on earth.

Justin Trudeau does not get this. In fact, he doesn’t get much—except for a personal tunnel-vision resulting from a sheltered upbringing within a cocoon of political privilege

Justin Trudeau does not get this. In fact, he doesn’t get much—except for a personal tunnel-vision resulting from a sheltered upbringing within a cocoon of political privilege.

As with father Pierre, Justin stands for very little, and what he does stand for is nebulous and theoretical at best. On the topic of institutionalized diversity, even idealist Pierre admitted defeat, when upon a return visit to Parliament in the mid-nineties he stated that multiculturalism had not worked out “the way he intended it to.”

Justin is no Pierre. In fact, apart from superficialities, Justin is no Prime Minister— except, of course, on paper.  In truth, he is an amateur politician with a professional public relations team. Will the veneer of polish on Justin’s Vogue magazine profile prevent the public from gaining insight into the true nature of the man? After all, four years is a fair stretch to maintain the wicked-grin image he has thus far cultivated.

Naturally, only time will tell, however after a mere three months in office and a growing list of broken campaign promises, the legacy of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau may turn out to be the very opposite of the one his keepers are presently manufacturing for him.



Brad Salzberg -- Bio and Archives | Comments

Brad Salzberg is the founder of the Cultural Action Party of Canada.

Commenting Policy

Please adhere to our commenting policy to avoid being banned. As a privately owned website, we reserve the right to remove any comment and ban any user at any time.

Comments that contain spam, advertising, vulgarity, threats of violence, racism, anti-Semitism, or personal or abusive attacks on other users may be removed and result in a ban.
-- Follow these instructions on registering: