Canadian News

Canadian News and Opinion

The Invasion of Canada

Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle. 1,477 people live in this little corner of Quebec with its apple orchards, elderberry fields and small wineries. But now 400 migrants can cross the border in a single day

On the other side of the border is New York. There the language is English. In Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, the language of choice is French. But these days you’re a more likely to hear Arabic, Urdu or Haitian French being spoken here as Roxham Road fills with clots of migrants scampering out of America.

By Daniel Greenfield - Saturday, August 19, 2017 - Full Story

Hillier & Reid: Parks Canada Needs to Take Responsibility for Flooding

(PERTH) Randy Hillier (Lanark-Frontenac-Lennox & Addington) along with his federal counterpart MP Scott Reid (Lanark-Frontenac-Kingston) have called on Parks Canada to help contribute to the relief efforts for those individuals and business affected by the recent flooding in Tay Valley Township.

“Last June at the height of the flooding, Scott and I sent a letter to Daniel Watson, the C.E.O of Parks Canada, outlining how policies at Parks Canada allowed the water level behind the dam at Bob’s Lake to remain higher than usual, which when hit with the unexpectedly high rainfall, resulted in an overflow at the dam and rapid flooding downstream,” Hillier explained. “We still have not received a reply to that letter.”

By Randy Hillier - Thursday, August 17, 2017 - Full Story

Can You Buy A Canadian Citizenship? Almost

There was a myth circulating in the deeper reaches of the internet that one could buy a Canadian citizenship from the Province of Quebec, assuming you were rich enough.  Or so I thought it was a myth.

As it turns out, it’s just about true.  It is entirely possible to essentially purchase Canadian Permanent Residency status, that is the level just beneath Canadian Citizenship, through something called the Quebec Immigrant Investor Program.

I’ll explain how this dubious bureaucratic quid pro quo transaction works in a moment, but first, what is the difference between Canadian Permanent Residency and Canadian Citizenship?

By Spencer Morrison - Thursday, August 17, 2017 - Full Story

Lower interest rates and rising incomes more than doubled amount Canadians can borrow for a home

VANCOUVER—Canadians have been able to qualify for much larger mortgages over the past two decades because of declining interest rates and rising incomes, and that has more than likely translated into higher home prices, finds a new study by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Increased borrowing power, brought about by falling interest rates and rising incomes, is potentially the most overlooked and least understood factor influencing home prices across Canada,” said Niels Veldhuis, president of the Fraser Institute.

By Fraser Institute - Thursday, August 17, 2017 - Full Story

Ottawa faces stark choice in NAFTA talks; scrap high-profile protectionist policies or risk the deal

VANCOUVER—To successfully renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canada may have to eliminate protectionist policies aimed at key Canadian industries—and that could be good news for the Canadian economy in the longer-run, according to a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Talks to renegotiate NAFTA, initiated by President Donald Trump, kick-off this week in Washington, D.C.

By Fraser Institute - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - Full Story

Trudeau helps Trump ‘Make American Great Again!’

President Donald Trump has said a lot of complimentary things about Canada’s prime minister. Gushing over Justin Trudeau at the recent G20 meeting, Trump said, “We have a great neighbour in Canada and Justin is doing a spectacular job in Canada. Everybody loves him and they love him for a reason so congratulations on the job you’re doing.” (National Post, July 8, 2017)

Trump’s statement, and other similar utterances surprised a lot of people. Trudeau, like President Obama, is engaged in a fundamental transformation of Canada. One of the differences is Trudeau is proceeding at a pace much faster than Obama did during his eight years in office. Trudeau even specifically said Canada is the world’s “first post-national state” with no core identity and no mainstream. Not only is he destroying the country but he brags about it. The U.S. president is the polar opposite. He won the election by rejecting the globalization trend and making it clear his main concern was for the United States.

By Arthur Weinreb - Monday, August 14, 2017 - Full Story

Pikangikum Rez: Exemplar of Canada’s Environmentalist Gulag

The fur trade transformed the Canadian aboriginal’s way of life. The trade, mainly in beaver pelts, began in the 1500s, peaked in the 1800s, and then declined until today when it supplements the incomes of a few thousand people. Trapping and trading consumed aboriginal communities. They traded pelts for tools, cookware, firearms and blankets – technologies that re-made their culture.

The fur trade changed where natives lived; and where they could live. It facilitated the adoption of European language and religion. Trade-induced contact with Europeans spawned peoples of mixed ancestory. By 1830 aboriginal culture bore little resemblance to any pre-contact way of life.

By William Kay - Sunday, August 13, 2017 - Full Story

Huron Perth Healthcare Alliance in Stratford faces soaring electricity bills

TORONTO, ON: Documents obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) reveal a dramatic increase to the cost of electricity to Huron Perth Healthcare Alliance since 2012.

The documents, obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, show that in the last five years, bills for the Stratford, Seaforth, St. Marys and Clinton sites rose from $1.36 million to $1.94 million. That’s a 43 per cent increase.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation Christine Van Geyn, CTF Ontario Director- Friday, August 11, 2017 - Full Story

The Tories seem totally unconcerned about securing Canada’s border

Last week, the Canadian government released statistics on the number of illegal immigrants crossing into Canada from the United States at points other than official ports of entry. These numbers include only those who were intercepted by the RCMP while illegally entering the country. It has been estimated hundreds of illegals are walking into Canada every day.

In June, the last month these statistics are available, 884 illegal border crossers were arrested coming into Canada. A whopping 781 of these “asylum seekers” crossed into Quebec. The resources available to house, feed and process these “refugees” are strained with some of them having to be housed in Montreal’s Olympic Stadium.

By Arthur Weinreb - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - Full Story

Woodstock Hospital electricity prices soar

TORONTO, ON: Documents obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) reveal a dramatic increase to the cost of electricity to the Woodstock Hospital since 2012.

The documents, obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, show that in the last five years, bills for the hospital rose from $1.03 million to $1.65 million. That’s a 60 per cent increase.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation - Thursday, August 10, 2017 - Full Story

London Health Sciences electricity bills surge by $2.1 million

TORONTO, ON:  Documents obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) reveal a dramatic increase to the cost of electricity at the University Hospital and Victoria Hospital campuses of London Health Sciences.

The documents, obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, show that in the last five years, bills for the two hospitals rose from $6.87 million to $9.24 million. That’s a 35 per cent increase.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Christine Van Geyn, CTF Ontario Director- Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - Full Story

St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital electricity bills skyrocketing

TORONTO, ON: Documents obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) reveal a dramatic increase to the cost of electricity to the St. Thomas Elgin General Hospital since 2012.

The documents, obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, show that in the last five years, bills for the health centre’s main campus rose from $779,835 million to $1.36 million. That’s a 75 per cent increase.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Christine Van Geyn, CTF Ontario Director- Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - Full Story

THE COVER-UP OF HIGH RIVER FORCED ENTRIES CONTINUES

On June 25, 2013, Alberta Justice Minister Jonathan Denis asked his Deputy Minister, Tim Grant this question: ‘What legal authority do the police rely upon to forcibly enter private property in the flood stricken area?’  Deputy Minister Grant forwarded Minister Denis’ question to newly appointed Assistant Deputy Minister and Director of Law Enforcement, Bill Sweeney (retired RCMP Commanding Officer for ‘E’ Division, the Province of Alberta).

ADM Sweeney then sent an e-mail to RCMP Assistant Commissioner Marianne Ryan asking her to answer Minister Denis’ question adding: ‘This was in relation to High River and breaking into homes to look for casualties.  The Minister was aware that firearms that have not been properly stored were seized during the (sic) these searches and also anticipates that some residents will ask this question later.’ Note: This was three days before the media and the public were made aware that firearms were being seized in High River.

By Dennis R. Young - Monday, August 7, 2017 - Full Story

Canada’s Passchendaele Heroes Offer Lessons for Today

One hundred years ago, Canadians were slugging it out with the Germans on a muddy battlefield near Passchendaele in northwestern Belgium. The Canadians fought with great distinction, gaining Canada new international respect, and the conflict still holds lessons for today.

As the National Post noted, for their bravery in that battle nine Canadians won the Victoria Cross, including private Tommy Holmes from Montreal. He took out took two German machine gun positions and forced the surrender of 19 enemy troops.

By Lloyd Billingsley - Saturday, August 5, 2017 - Full Story

Ontario government’s timeline to reduce debt lacks specifics and relies on questionable assump

TORONTO—Queen’s Park’s timeline for reducing the province’s historically high debt burden relies on optimistic and questionable assumptions and lacks a detailed, credible plan to achieve it, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

The Ontario government has acknowledged the province’s current debt-to-GDP ratio—a measure used to evaluate a jurisdiction’s debt burden—is too high at 37 per cent of the economy and has pledged to lower it back to the pre-recession level of 27 per cent by 2029/30.

But the government has offered no specifics on how it will achieve that goal.

By Fraser Institute - Thursday, August 3, 2017 - Full Story

Save the planet through innovation not taxation

This column first ran in the Winnipeg Free Press and is now free to reprint.

Nazim Cicek might save the planet. He’s researching cellulosic biofuel production that could turn corn stalks and cattails into clean energy. A breakthrough could have a global impact.

We all want to protect the environment—the question is how? Technologies such as cellulosic biofuels show promise. Meanwhile carbon taxes are expensive and ineffective.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation Todd MacKay, Prairie Director, Canadian Taxpayers Federation- Wednesday, August 2, 2017 - Full Story

Health-care costs for typical Canadian family will eclipse $12,000 this year; up nearly 70% since 19

VANCOUVER—A typical Canadian family of four will pay $12,057 for health care in 2017—an increase of nearly 70 per cent over the last 20 years, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Health care in Canada isn’t free—Canadians actually pay a substantial amount for health care through their taxes, even if they don’t pay directly for medical services,” said Bacchus Barua, senior economist with the Fraser Institute’s Centre for Health Policy Studies and co-author of The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2017.

By Fraser Institute - Tuesday, August 1, 2017 - Full Story

Taxpayers can’t afford the bill for Diversity Gardens

PRINCE ALBERT, SK: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) is calling on federal, provincial and municipal governments to reverse their decision to spend $60 million on the Diversity Gardens project while running massive deficits.

“These governments are plunging Manitobans deeper into debt by billions; they continue to impose heavy tax burdens; and, they’re struggling to fund basic services such as healthcare and road repair; but, they have tens of millions for a new garden?” asked Todd MacKay, the CTF’s Prairie Director. “This country has a rich heritage of diversity that we nourish in our neighbourhoods and it’s wonderful to enjoy plant life in nature, but we have to say no to these luxury projects at a time when we’re borrowing money to run hospitals and fix roads.”

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Todd MacKay – CTF Prairie Director- Saturday, July 29, 2017 - Full Story