Science-Technology

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Sushi’s sublime secrets (video)

WASHINGTON — Sushi is sublime. Just fresh fish and seasoned rice in its simplest form served one on top of the other, or rolled up with some veggies in a seaweed wrapper. What creates the subtle interplay of flavors in your tuna nigiri? Take a deep dive into the chemistry of rice, fish and seaweed in this video from Reactions

 

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - Full Story

Toward unbreakable encrypted messages

Chinese researchers recently announced a landmark advancement: They used a satellite orbiting Earth to beam pairs of quantum-entangled photons to two Tibetan mountaintops more than 700 miles apart. This distance blew the previous record out of the water. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, this is only the beginning for quantum communication.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, September 15, 2017 - Full Story

Self-folding electronics could enable advanced robotics (video)

As demand grows for more versatile, advanced robotics and other technologies, the need for components that can enable these applications also increases. Producing such components en masse has been a major challenge. But now, in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, researchers report that they have developed a way to help meet this need by printing electronics that can fold themselves into a desired shape. Watch a video showing the resulting prototypes here.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, September 15, 2017 - Full Story

Cassini’s legacy and the atmospheric chemistry of Titan (video)

WASHINGTON—The Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency, is set to end on Sept. 15. The mission has told us a great deal about the unique and unexpected chemistry of Saturn’s moon Titan, and it has changed the way we think about our own planet and the entire solar system. Learn how in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 14, 2017 - Full Story

How one little sensor will make your life better

Vayyar sensors provide a 3D map of people in a room without revealing identities

How did an Israeli startup evolve from using radio frequency (RF) technology intended to detect breast cancer to creating palm-sized devices that can monitor passengers in self-driving cars? That’s the remarkable story of Vayyar Imaging,  which is building a multi-purpose sensor with real-life uses that sound straight out of science fiction.

Vayyar’s three cofounders – Raviv Melamed, Miri Ratner and Naftali Chayat – discovered in 2011 that each had a family member suffering from cancer. They set out to make a difference. The product they built was a thumb-sized sensor with 24 built-in RF antennas.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - Full Story

Making 3-D printing safer

Within the past decade, 3-D printers have gone from bulky, expensive curiosities to compact, more affordable consumer products. At the same time, concerns have emerged that nanoparticles released from the machines during use could affect consumers’ health. Now researchers report in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology a way to eliminate almost all nanoparticle emissions from some of these printers.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 11, 2017 - Full Story

TP-Link Router offers plentiful features and good range

If your home is plagued by Wi-Fi dropouts and other router issues, you may want to think about an upgrade, perhaps to one that offers multiple bands to up your choices and, with luck, performance.

Hence TP-Link’s AC5400 Wireless Tri-Band MU-MIMO, also known as the Archer C5400 Gigabit Router. This sucker offers a total of six distinct networks, kind of: 1 x 2.4 GHz, and 2 x 5 GHz, with all three options available for both regular use or as specially noted “Guest” networks, so you won’t get in trouble for some overnight interloper’s porn downloads. Or whatever your issue may be.

By Jim Bray - Saturday, September 9, 2017 - Full Story

The chemicals we leave behind (video)

WASHINGTON, Everything we use is made out of chemicals. So it’s not surprising that we pick up a lot of foreign molecules from what we bump into all the time, from our multivitamins to the gas we put in our cars. Scientists are now starting to track these everyday chemicals in ways that could be helpful in health and forensic sciences. Learn how in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 7, 2017 - Full Story

How rubber makes sports possible (video)

WASHINGTON — Sports balls of all varieties owe their resilience and reliability to an unusual polymer — one whose derivatives and spinoffs are everywhere you look, from cars to shoes to rocket fuel. Learn about rubber, the all-star’s best friend, in this new video from Reactions just in time for kickoff.

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - Full Story

Oppo’s new flagship 4K player continues the brand’s record of excellence

Relatively hot on the heels of its outstanding UDP-203 universal player comes Oppo Digital’s UDP-205, a sequel that not only equals the previous player’s great video quality but which also ups the audio ante substantially.

And how often can one say that a sequel is better than the original?

The UDP-205 is also the successor up to the company’s BDP-105, which was a heckuva tour de force in its own right. But like its little brother, the UDP-205 adds 4K disc playback capability to the mix. That could be enough to justify it for folks who’ve embraced - or are planning to - the 4K disc format (and if you’re a "home theatrephile" you really should). But 4K is only one thing that’s great about this high end disc player that’s also perfectly happy to function as a media hub and more.

By Jim Bray - Sunday, September 3, 2017 - Full Story

Going ‘green’ with plant-based resins

Airplanes, electronics and solar cells are all in demand, but the materials holding these items together — epoxy thermosets — are not environmentally friendly. Now, a group reports in ACS’ journal Macromolecules that they have created a plant-based thermoset that could make devices “greener.”

By American Chemical Society - Monday, August 28, 2017 - Full Story

Tablo makes a DVR for cord cutters - while Kensington offers dual USB in its power adapter for trave

Dumping cable and/or satellite appears to be quite the trend these days but what happens, once you’ve gotten rid of the service, if you want to record your favourite programs for watching later? Equally important: how are you going to watch the shows in the first place?

Well, that’s the idea behind Nuvyyo’s Tablo DUAL, which the company claims is the first network-connected over-the-air (OTA) DVR to also include 40 hours’ worth of onboard high definition recording storage. In other words, it has a hard drive built in by which you can record your favourite TV broadcasts that spew into the air from your local TV stations.

By Jim Bray - Sunday, August 20, 2017 - Full Story

How ambient energy could power the internet of things

In the modern world, we are increasingly surrounded by digital sensors, cameras and communications devices sending data cloud-based analysis services. Those devices need power, and designers are finding new ways to draw it from ambient sources rather than rely on batteries or hard-wired grid connections. This week Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, examines energy harvesters and their role in the growing internet of things.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - Full Story

Memory foam advances give firm support to growing mattress industry

The way we sleep started to change in 1992 with the commercial release of memory foam — a product originally developed at NASA. A decade later, the product became more accessible when the first compressed mattress sold in a box debuted. Today, the polyurethane mattress industry continues to innovate and grow thanks to new chemistry, as reported in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - Full Story

How to cryopreserve fish embryos and bring them back to life (video)

Scientists report for the first time the ability to both deep freeze and reanimate zebrafish embryos. The method, appearing in the journal ACS Nano, could potentially be used to bank larger aquatic and other vertebrate oocytes and embryos, too, for a life in the future. See how the researchers did it in this Headline Science video:

Watch a zebrafish embryo revive after being frozen in this Headline Science video

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - Full Story

Smart toys without the batteries

The greatest challenge in entertaining young children is keeping their toys powered up. Now, one group reports in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they are one step closer to battery-free interactive games.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, 97 percent of children in the U.S. under the age of 4 have had some type of exposure to a mobile device. These devices are limited by the batteries’ ability to hold a charge.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - Full Story

How animals glow (video)

WASHINGTON, Fireflies, frogs, jellyfish, mushrooms and even parrots have the ability to emit light from their bodies. These creatures use either bioluminescence or fluorescence to put on their light shows. Speaking of Chemistry explains the chemistry behind these natural light sources in this week’s video:

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By American Chemical Society - Monday, August 14, 2017 - Full Story

Rotel’s new nearly-all-in-one audio component sounds very sweet

Perhaps you could call it an "unreceiver." Or maybe a "deceiver."

However you refer to it, Rotel’s RAP-1580 is a one box solution to most current audio needs. The only mainstream feature it doesn’t have on it is a radio tuner, which would make it a "receiver." And as popular as receivers are, I can’t see why many folks would care about that in 2017, since the RAP has Bluetooth capability by which you can stream your favourite radio stations from around the world via a smart device and the Internet.

By Jim Bray - Friday, August 11, 2017 - Full Story

The nitty-gritty behind how onions make you cry

Adding onions to a recipe can make a meal taste rich and savory, but cutting up the onion can be brutal.  Onions release a compound called lachrymatory factor (LF), which makes the eyes sting and water. Scientists know that a certain enzyme causes this irritating compound to form but precisely how it helps LF form in the onion remained an open question. Now, one group reports in ACS Chemical Biology that they have the answer.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - Full Story

How superhydrophobic materials stay totally dry (video)

WASHINGTON,  — Raincoats, car windshields, waterproof phones: They all use a little chemistry to stay dry. Inspired by nature, chemists use extremely water-fearing, or superhydrophobic, coatings to repel water from surfaces to keep them dry. Watch as the Reactions team uses a high-speed camera and some brave volunteers to bring the science of staying dry to life:

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - Full Story