Science-Technology

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Cielo Close to Commercialization with its First Continuous-flow Waste to Renewable Diesel Refinery

Cielo Waste Solutions (CSE:CMC) is delivering on its promise to build its first commercial-grade renewable diesel refinery. Construction is well underway at its High River facility – proving that its proprietary technology will be able to convert multiple different waste feed-stocks,  including landfill waste, into high-grade, renewable diesel has moved the company from demonstration to commercial stage.

Vancouver-based Cielo has extended its private placement offering of units, to accommodate additional subscribers. The private placement has so far raised $2,283,236 for moving its development forward.  A private lender has also signed a Term Sheet with Cielo extending the Company a $3.5 million line of credit. Currently, Cielo and the company are working thru the paperwork to get the credit facility finalized. The 356-litre-an hour continuous flow refinery that Cielo is currently building is a retrofit of a 50-litre-an-hour batch process demonstration plant, which the company and its license provider have been using as a test facility.

By Rick Mills - Monday, October 16, 2017 - Full Story

Soundlink Micro makes big sound for a tiny package; and The House falls down

First came the Soundlink, then a while later came the Soundlink Mini. So it was probably inevitable that Bose would follow up eventually with this new, micro-sized Bluetooth speaker.

It only makes sense, what with technology’s continuous process of miniaturization and optimization. A computer that used to fill a room is now outclassed by a smart phone and room-filling speakers can now fill rooms from enclosures a fraction of the size of other types of loudspeaker.

With audio, however, the fly in the ointment is bass. Bass frequencies have longer wavelengths than the higher tones and that has traditionally meant you needed those honking big cabinets to reproduce those low frequencies faithfully, while you could get away with smaller speakers for the higher stuff. Hence the proliferation of subwoofers and satellite speakers.

By Jim Bray - Saturday, October 14, 2017 - Full Story

“Cook” an Egg with No Heat— — and other weird egg science

WASHINGTON, Oct. 10, 2017 — You can learn a lot from eggs. The versatile, delicious, humble chicken egg. You can unlock the secrets of the universe with eggs, or at least a couple of them through these fun (if slightly weird) DIY chemistry experiments in our latest episode of Reactions. Find out how you can “cook” an egg without heat, make them bounce like a basketball and whip up a batch of green eggs for the Dr. Seuss fans in your life: https://youtu.be/1aMzpbqSw9o.

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - Full Story

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Cryo-electron microscopy explained (video)

WASHINGTON— Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have claimed this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The trio earned the prize for their work on cryo-electron microscopy, which is an imaging technique that lets researchers see proteins and other large biomolecules with atomic precision. Learn more about this discovery and its impact in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:

 

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, October 5, 2017 - Full Story

Notes On Tricky Use Of Math

A bat and ball cost $1.10 in total. The bat costs $1 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost?

Almost everyone who reads this question will have an immediate impulse to answer ‘10 cents.’ I surely did. As Dan Gardner says, “It just looks and feels right. And yet it’s wrong. It’s clearly wrong—if you give it some careful thought—and yet it is perfectly normal to stumble on this test. Almost everyone we ask reports an initial tendency to answer ‘ten cents,’ write psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Shane Frederick. Many people yield to this immediate impulse. People are often content to trust a plausible judgment that quickly comes to mind.” 1

By Jack Dini - Friday, September 29, 2017 - Full Story

Better pancakes through chemistry

WASHINGTON — Everyone seems to swear by a different pancake recipe. How can you griddle up the perfect pancakes for your Saturday morning breakfast? With chemistry, of course. Just in time for National Pancake Day, this video from Reactions will show you how to use chemistry to improve your flapjacks:

 

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 25, 2017 - Full Story

Cell phone data coupled with sewage testing show drug use patterns

The drugs people inhale, inject or ingest ultimately end up in some form down the toilet. So scientists have started monitoring drug use through sewage-based epidemiology. But this approach hasn’t taken into account the variation in number of people who add to wastewater in a given area at a given time. Now one team reports in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology a way to account for commutes and vacations: by tracking cell phone signals.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 25, 2017 - Full Story

Sushi’s sublime secrets (video)

WASHINGTON — Sushi is sublime. Just fresh fish and seasoned rice in its simplest form served one on top of the other, or rolled up with some veggies in a seaweed wrapper. What creates the subtle interplay of flavors in your tuna nigiri? Take a deep dive into the chemistry of rice, fish and seaweed in this video from Reactions

 

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, September 20, 2017 - Full Story

Toward unbreakable encrypted messages

Chinese researchers recently announced a landmark advancement: They used a satellite orbiting Earth to beam pairs of quantum-entangled photons to two Tibetan mountaintops more than 700 miles apart. This distance blew the previous record out of the water. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, this is only the beginning for quantum communication.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, September 15, 2017 - Full Story

Self-folding electronics could enable advanced robotics (video)

As demand grows for more versatile, advanced robotics and other technologies, the need for components that can enable these applications also increases. Producing such components en masse has been a major challenge. But now, in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, researchers report that they have developed a way to help meet this need by printing electronics that can fold themselves into a desired shape. Watch a video showing the resulting prototypes here.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, September 15, 2017 - Full Story

Cassini’s legacy and the atmospheric chemistry of Titan (video)

WASHINGTON—The Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, a collaboration between NASA and the European Space Agency, is set to end on Sept. 15. The mission has told us a great deal about the unique and unexpected chemistry of Saturn’s moon Titan, and it has changed the way we think about our own planet and the entire solar system. Learn how in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 14, 2017 - Full Story

How one little sensor will make your life better

Vayyar sensors provide a 3D map of people in a room without revealing identities

How did an Israeli startup evolve from using radio frequency (RF) technology intended to detect breast cancer to creating palm-sized devices that can monitor passengers in self-driving cars? That’s the remarkable story of Vayyar Imaging,  which is building a multi-purpose sensor with real-life uses that sound straight out of science fiction.

Vayyar’s three cofounders – Raviv Melamed, Miri Ratner and Naftali Chayat – discovered in 2011 that each had a family member suffering from cancer. They set out to make a difference. The product they built was a thumb-sized sensor with 24 built-in RF antennas.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, September 13, 2017 - Full Story

Making 3-D printing safer

Within the past decade, 3-D printers have gone from bulky, expensive curiosities to compact, more affordable consumer products. At the same time, concerns have emerged that nanoparticles released from the machines during use could affect consumers’ health. Now researchers report in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology a way to eliminate almost all nanoparticle emissions from some of these printers.

By American Chemical Society - Monday, September 11, 2017 - Full Story

TP-Link Router offers plentiful features and good range

If your home is plagued by Wi-Fi dropouts and other router issues, you may want to think about an upgrade, perhaps to one that offers multiple bands to up your choices and, with luck, performance.

Hence TP-Link’s AC5400 Wireless Tri-Band MU-MIMO, also known as the Archer C5400 Gigabit Router. This sucker offers a total of six distinct networks, kind of: 1 x 2.4 GHz, and 2 x 5 GHz, with all three options available for both regular use or as specially noted “Guest” networks, so you won’t get in trouble for some overnight interloper’s porn downloads. Or whatever your issue may be.

By Jim Bray - Saturday, September 9, 2017 - Full Story

The chemicals we leave behind (video)

WASHINGTON, Everything we use is made out of chemicals. So it’s not surprising that we pick up a lot of foreign molecules from what we bump into all the time, from our multivitamins to the gas we put in our cars. Scientists are now starting to track these everyday chemicals in ways that could be helpful in health and forensic sciences. Learn how in this video from Speaking of Chemistry:

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, September 7, 2017 - Full Story

How rubber makes sports possible (video)

WASHINGTON — Sports balls of all varieties owe their resilience and reliability to an unusual polymer — one whose derivatives and spinoffs are everywhere you look, from cars to shoes to rocket fuel. Learn about rubber, the all-star’s best friend, in this new video from Reactions just in time for kickoff.

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, September 5, 2017 - Full Story

Oppo’s new flagship 4K player continues the brand’s record of excellence

Relatively hot on the heels of its outstanding UDP-203 universal player comes Oppo Digital’s UDP-205, a sequel that not only equals the previous player’s great video quality but which also ups the audio ante substantially.

And how often can one say that a sequel is better than the original?

The UDP-205 is also the successor up to the company’s BDP-105, which was a heckuva tour de force in its own right. But like its little brother, the UDP-205 adds 4K disc playback capability to the mix. That could be enough to justify it for folks who’ve embraced - or are planning to - the 4K disc format (and if you’re a "home theatrephile" you really should). But 4K is only one thing that’s great about this high end disc player that’s also perfectly happy to function as a media hub and more.

By Jim Bray - Sunday, September 3, 2017 - Full Story

Going ‘green’ with plant-based resins

Airplanes, electronics and solar cells are all in demand, but the materials holding these items together — epoxy thermosets — are not environmentally friendly. Now, a group reports in ACS’ journal Macromolecules that they have created a plant-based thermoset that could make devices “greener.”

By American Chemical Society - Monday, August 28, 2017 - Full Story

Tablo makes a DVR for cord cutters - while Kensington offers dual USB in its power adapter for trave

Dumping cable and/or satellite appears to be quite the trend these days but what happens, once you’ve gotten rid of the service, if you want to record your favourite programs for watching later? Equally important: how are you going to watch the shows in the first place?

Well, that’s the idea behind Nuvyyo’s Tablo DUAL, which the company claims is the first network-connected over-the-air (OTA) DVR to also include 40 hours’ worth of onboard high definition recording storage. In other words, it has a hard drive built in by which you can record your favourite TV broadcasts that spew into the air from your local TV stations.

By Jim Bray - Sunday, August 20, 2017 - Full Story

How ambient energy could power the internet of things

In the modern world, we are increasingly surrounded by digital sensors, cameras and communications devices sending data cloud-based analysis services. Those devices need power, and designers are finding new ways to draw it from ambient sources rather than rely on batteries or hard-wired grid connections. This week Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, examines energy harvesters and their role in the growing internet of things.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - Full Story