Health and Medicine

Health and Medicine, Cancer, Weight loss, Vitamins, Healthy Living, Surgery, Alternative Medicine, Health News

A Recipe for Alzheimer’s Disease

A Recipe for Alzheimer’s Disease
What causes Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)? I recently read an article written by Stephanie Seneff, a Senior Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. I know from my years at Harvard that MIT does not employ dummies. So it’s worthwhile reading her “Recipe for Developing AD.”

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, November 20, 2017 - Full Story

The Right Man for Healing and a Rare Find

The Right Man for Healing and a Rare Find
I was not sure my ENT specialist was a good fit for me even though I read the glowing praises framed on his office walls, praises coming from his patients, colleagues, and other doctors. The young man seemed to know what he was doing but his bedside manner was brief and rather cold.
I attributed his demeanor to his introverted personality, his professionalism, and to his respect for his patients’ time. Very punctual, he very seldom made anybody wait to see him, he was always on time.

One day I realized that he was much more caring on the inside than he let people see. A young woman with her mom and a three-year old in tow had an appointment to see the doctor. The receptionist, Lupe, asked her if she was prepared to pay for that day’s visit. The young woman had a grief-stricken look on her face and wondered how much the visit was going to be. The receptionist told her that she did not know because each patient was different, depending on the problem. The young woman replied in a sad and disappointed voice that she will reschedule until such a time that she would have enough cash on hand to pay for the visit.

By Dr. Ileana Johnson Paugh - Thursday, November 16, 2017 - Full Story

The only detox you’ll ever need (video)

WASHINGTON—People talk all the time about how they need to “detox.” And there’s a line of companies a mile long waiting to sell you juices and smoothies that claim to cleanse your body of harmful toxins. But the good news is your body is working hard to clear out toxins before you spend a dime on expensive products. Toxicology expert Raychelle Burks explains how in this kale-free episode of Reactions:

By American Chemical Society - Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - Full Story

Erectile Dysfunction; But What about Female Dysfunction?

Erectile Dysfunction; But What about Female Dysfunction?
How many males would like to see their genitals shrink so it’s impossible to have sex? I bet not many. So today, the term erectile dysfunction (ED) has lost its stigma and become familiar words. Tens of thousands of males now find solace in   ED drugs. But what about women in their 40s and later years who suffer from more than a headache when sex is mentioned? This is where equality of the sexes is sadly lacking.

Maurice Chevalier used the say, “Vive la difference” about sex. But this difference presents problems at menopause for both sexes. For males menopause is less abrupt, but they can suffer from fatigue, insomnia, grumpiness, problems at work and ED.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Tuesday, November 14, 2017 - Full Story

New needle-free vaccines could mean the end of the flu shot

New needle-free vaccines could mean the end of the flu shot
Autumn has arrived, leaves are changing colors, and pumpkin spice aromas are sweeping stores. It’s also the season for flu shots. The good news is that the annual jab in the arm designed to protect us from the flu might one day be a thing of the past. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, describes advances in injection-free vaccination methods that are showing promise.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, November 10, 2017 - Full Story

New “sugar-glass” film uses viruses to kill harmful bacteria in food

New sugar-glass film uses viruses to kill harmful bacteria in food
With antibiotic resistance on the rise, bacterial contamination of food is becoming more problematic. Now in a study appearing in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, scientists report that they have developed an antibacterial “sugar-glass” coating in which viruses that destroy bacteria are embedded and are kept stable for up to three months. The coating could someday be used in the food packaging and processing industries to help prevent food-borne illnesses and deaths.

By American Chemical Society - Friday, November 10, 2017 - Full Story

What These 3 Doctors Think Should Be Done for Children Who Think They Are Transgender

Doctors, feeling, facts, Transgenders
Cross-sex hormones used to replace the normal pubertal process can cause cardiovascular disease, strokes, diabetes, and cancers, says Dr. Michelle Cretella. (Photo: Vast Photography/Newscom)

Three doctors, specializing in pediatrics, biology, and psychiatry, are criticizing what they say is the reliance on feelings over facts when it comes to studying and treating children who think they’re transgender.

By Heritage Foundation - Friday, November 10, 2017 - Full Story

Smartphone app listens to your voice for lung disease

Smartphone app listens to your voice for lung disease
Should you be worried that your mobile phone is invading your privacy by listening in to your conversations without your knowledge? Not if the goal is to save your life.

Israeli startup Healthymize has developed an app that records all your calls but, rather than send that data to Facebook or Google to sell you products you didn’t even know you wanted, Healthymize listens for signals of COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

By ISRAEL21c - Thursday, November 9, 2017 - Full Story

Compound in cannabis could ease asthma

Compound in cannabis could ease asthma
Hebrew University Prof. Raphael Mechoulam, known as the “father” of the medical cannabis industry, will lead a team investigating the benefits of non-psychoactive cannabis components for treating asthma and other respiratory conditions.

In 1964, Mechoulam, was the first scientist to successfully isolate the THC component in cannabis. He was then a young researcher at Israel’s Weizmann Institute of Science.

By ISRAEL21c - Thursday, November 9, 2017 - Full Story

Israel sends emergency aid package to plague-stricken Madagascar

Israel sends emergency aid package to plague-stricken Madagascar, Black Death
The Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the South African branch of Israel’s national emergency service, Magen David Adom, have put together an aid package for Madagascar following a deadly outbreak of the plague there.

By ISRAEL21c - Thursday, November 9, 2017 - Full Story

Hazards of Travel

Hazards of Travel
I’m sure many readers love to travel. I do too! After all, travel is associated with fun, education and happy times. No one intentionally leaves home to have a bad time. But travel can sometimes result in a “pukefest”, be outright dangerous and occasionally fatal. So how can the hazards be avoided?

Flying to your Destination

Some people have a fear of flying, especially to a destination when newspaper headlines have described a catastrophic airplane accident. But according to the U.S. National Safety Council, there’s a greater chance of dying in a car crash on your way to the airport. For instance, the death rate from cars is 0.47 per 100 million passenger miles. For domestic flights, it’s 0.001 or 500 times safer. Every year 35,000 U.S citizens die in car accidents. Worldwide, only 898 people die in plane crashes! You don’t need to be a mathematician to decide to fly if you have the choice.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, November 6, 2017 - Full Story

The Ugly Truth About Sex Reassignment the Transgender Lobby Doesn’t Want You to Know

The Ugly Truth, Sex Reassignment, tTransgender Lobby, suicide
Sex reassignment is as natural as being born, some in the media tell us. And many Americans are buying it.

But a growing chorus of dissenters made up of physicians, researchers, and even transgender individuals is beginning to paint a far different picture of the truth.

By Heritage Foundation - Monday, November 6, 2017 - Full Story

‘Unbelievable’: Heart Stents Fail to Ease Chest Pain

A procedure used to relieve chest pain in hundreds of thousands of heart patients each year is useless for many of them, researchers reported on Wednesday.

Their study focused on the insertion of stents, tiny wire cages, to open blocked arteries. The devices are lifesaving when used to open arteries in patients in the throes of a heart attack.—More…

By News on the Net - Saturday, November 4, 2017 - Full Story

Saliva proteins could explain why some people overuse salt

Saliva proteins could explain why some people overuse salt
Many Americans consume too much salt. Now in a study appearing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that people who can easily taste salt have differing amounts of certain proteins in their saliva than those who are less sensitive. The finding could help explain why some of us have a hard time shaking the salt habit and could potentially lead to the development of more desirable low-sodium foods.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

Nicotine’s hold: What the gut and gender have to do with it

Nicotine's hold: What the gut and gender have to do with it, Nicotine affects the gut microbiome differently in male and female mice
Many people who smoke or chew tobacco can’t seem to escape nicotine’s addictive properties. Studies show that women in particular seem to have a harder time quitting, even with assistance, when compared to men. Now, scientists report in a mouse study published in ACS’ journal Chemical Research in Toxicology that the difference in gender smoking patterns and smoking’s effects could be due to how nicotine impacts the brain-gut relationship.

By American Chemical Society - Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

An aspirin a day keeps many cancers away, study suggests

Long-term aspirin use reduces the risk of developing many cancers, a major study has shown.

Chinese researchers followed the progress of more than 600,000 people in the largest study to date looking at the link between cancer and aspirin.—More…

By News on the Net -- Telegraph- Thursday, November 2, 2017 - Full Story

It’s Time to Winterize Skin. It Doesn’t Tear Nylons!

 It’s Time to Winterize Skin
My editor, namely my wife of 62 years, recently said to me, “I’m getting tired of reading about Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular problems, cancer and other dreadful ailments. Why don’t you, for one week, give us a break from depressing disease? I’m sure readers would like to learn how to protect   skin during the coming winter season.”

One thing I’ve learned over the years is you never say no to an editor, particularly one who is your wife! So I interviewed experts about winterizing skin so it doesn’t look like dried prune. And are natural remedies available?

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 30, 2017 - Full Story

10 Facts You Should Know About Coenzyme Q10

10 Facts You Should Know About Coenzyme Q10

Mark Twain once remarked, “Get your facts first, then distort them as you please!” Facts are easy to distort in medicine, particularly when talking about coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). So here are 10 vital things to know about this important enzyme. And what unintended consequences occur when humans start playing God.

One- What is CoQ10? It’s often referred to as the “sparkplug of our motors.” Cars run on gas. Our 37 trillion cells get their energy from ATP (adenosine triphosphate), but we cannot make ATP without CoQ10.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Monday, October 23, 2017 - Full Story

A new class of drugs aims to exploit cancer cells’ weaknesses

In recent years, new cancer treatments have brought hope to people who once had limited options. But for others, the wait for an effective drug continues. Now on the horizon is a new generation of drugs based on a concept called synthetic lethality. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes stock of what’s in the pipeline.

By American Chemical Society - Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - Full Story

How your eyelids move is a clue to diagnosing disease

What do your eyes say? An eyelid motion monitor (EMM) under advanced development at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa can diagnose certain diseases.

By ISRAEL21c - Wednesday, October 18, 2017 - Full Story