The real McCoy


By —— Bio and Archives November 4, 2008

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If there is one word in the English language that can drive a liberal to do crazy things right at this time, you can be sure it is “PALIN.”  She pronounces it ‘PAYLYN’.

Liberals are so steamed over that word that they have placed all emphasis on finding ways to destroy anything so labeled.  The Internet is currently rife with doctored photos that are less than wholesome, and really, are almost as disgusting as the sleazy scumbags that have authored, or to be truthful, doctored, the pornographic images to make someone think that the result is a “PALIN.” 
 
But no matter what they do, the real McCoy, meaning the real Palin, as in Sarah Palin, Republican appointee as candidate for Vice President, comes shining through all the trash as perhaps the real Messiah in this campaign and delivers the goods. 
 
Each time the delightfully lovely, exceedingly eloquent, bountifully brilliant Governor of the great state of Alaska, Mrs. Sarah Palin takes to the microphones to address the citizens of the United States, she hits a humongous home run, clearing the bases and running up the score in her party’s favor.
 
She was relatively unknown and unheard of before September 2008, save for her home area in Alaska, a fairly sizeable number of miles distant to the Northwest of the continental United States.
 
Sarah (I hope she doesn’t mind my familiarity, but I already feel as though I know her well, without ever having met her in person, such is the power and charm of her persona) made her debut on the American political stage in the waning days of August when Senator John McCain introduced her as his choice for a running mate for the offices of President and Vice President.
 
In just a brief few minutes Governor Palin had millions of residents cupped in the palm of her tidy hands begging for more, so strong and poignant was her message.  And only moments later as she completed her introductory salutations to America hundreds of thousands of disgruntled conservative members of her political party were clamoring to return with offers of not only financial assistance but actual physical help as well.
 
During that week when Sarah made herself known the nation had also watched as the opposition party held its convention and made great strides at bringing harmonious tones to a widely philosophically separated body after a particularly strenuous and combative political primary season.  And now her party was being swept back into a unified group, with all eyes and ears finely tuned to Sarah Palin’s every word and body language communication.
 
To say that she was an overnight sensation would not be accurate; she was an immediate sensation.  From young, somewhat disinterested men and women, to older, more stately and reserved as well as intransigent and unmoving veteran conservatives lifted their heads and said, “Wow! We have a winner here.” 
 
The next several days saw a metamorphosis of the national political party from a slumbering, disaffected giant to an energized and totally motivated behemoth full of zip and zing and ready for action.   Then about one week later, Governor Palin once again took microphone in hand and addressed the assembled group of her party’s national convention for her formal acceptance speech.
 
The results of that skyrocket address are still being measured and counted, but suffice to say they are gigantic and still piling up.  The total numbers of individuals tallied by the various networks and broadcast entities took some time to tabulate, but it has already been classified as the greatest number of listeners to a political message in the history of our country, spilling over the 40 million mark.  If that isn’t messianic proportions I don’t know what is, stealing the thunder of the opposition party’s standard bearer in a totally unexpected fashion.
 
This soft-spoken, except when otherwise required, lady delivered her verbal epistle in a straightforward and forthright manner that allowed everyone to clearly understand just exactly where she was coming from and going to.  And it all bodes well for our country.  It has already shone its bright light on the party treasury piling on over 7 million dollars in the first 24 hours following the talk.
 
Some people have already described Palin as being of ‘rock-star’ caliber.  I prefer to call her our female Ronnie Reagan; that’s even better than the rock-star designation.
 
But as you might suspect, success doesn’t come cheaply, there is always a price to pay.  Right now just after her initial successes the evil side of the opposition is dredging their intelligence banks for any muck and mire they can find to douse on her parade.  And with people like Daily Kos, MoveOn.org, the George Soros scum-suckers and many more of the unenlightened and unwashed there will be plenty more to come.



Jerry McConnell -- Bio and Archives | Comments

Gerald A. “Jerry” McConnell, 92, of Hampton, died Sunday, February 19, 2017, at the Merrimack Valley Hospice House in Haverhill, Mass., surrounded by his loved ones. He was born May 27, 1924 in Altoona, Pa., the fifth son of the late John E. and Grace (Fletcher) McConnell.

Jerry served ten years with the US Marine Corps and participated in the landing against Japanese Army on Guadalcanal and another ten years with the US Air Force. After moving to Hampton in 1957 he started his community activities serving in many capacities.

 

He shared 72 years of marriage with his wife Betty P. (Hamilton) McConnell. In addition to his wife, family members include nieces and nephews.

 

McConnell’s e-book about Guadalcanal, “Our Survival was Open to the Gravest Doubts

 

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